Comfa Religion and Creole Language in a Caribbean Community

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SUNY Press, May 16, 2001 - 244 páginas
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Through a distinctive blend of description and analysis Kean Gibson examines the Guyanese religion known as “Comfa.” Reflecting the socio-cultural history of Guyana, Comfa shows influences of European and Asian cultures and religions in an essentially African framework. Gibson compares the variation exemplified in Comfa with the Guyanese Creole language and challenges the continuum theory of Creole linguistics, which predicts that the Creole language will evolve to become English. Gibson also explores the implications of both forms of social behavior for the notion of identity in a multicultural community.
 

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Contenido

Peoples and Religions of Guyana
1
Faithist Church and Spirit Beliefs
55
Comfa Ceremonies
91
Comfa as an African Derivation
149
Comfa as Social Process
169
The Continuums of Guyanese Creole and Guyanese Comfa
191
References
227
Index
237
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Acerca del autor (2001)

Kean Gibson is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Language, Linguistics and Literature at the University of the West Indies, Barbados.

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