La serpiente emplumada

Front Cover
Editorial Montesinos, 2000 - 457 pages
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

The author DH Lawrence, was fatally shot in the eye during the New Year celebrations of 1930, to look out from a balcony at the Santa Isabela in Mexico City.
Trend to fascism, hated the Mexican
people, but also its nature and mysticism caused him great fascination.
It was considered a follower of the philosophies Nazi persecutor of mystical and spiritual philosophies sought by Hitler and his followers.
 

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
25
Section 3
48
Section 4
72
Section 5
81
Section 6
99
Section 7
113
Section 8
135
Section 15
225
Section 16
234
Section 17
252
Section 18
274
Section 19
294
Section 20
312
Section 21
339
Section 22
361

Section 9
142
Section 10
157
Section 11
172
Section 12
185
Section 13
195
Section 14
211
Section 23
381
Section 24
397
Section 25
406
Section 26
426
Section 27
438
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda , who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.

Bibliographic information