Obtenga el sí: el arte de negociar sin ceder

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Grupo Planeta (GBS), Feb 25, 2008 - 214 pages
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Getting to Yes is a straightorward, universally applicable method for negotiating personal and professional disputes without getting taken -- and without getting angry. It offers a concise, step-by-step, proven strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict -- whether it involves parents and children, neighbors, bosses and employees, customers or corporations, tenants or diplomats. Based on the work of Harvard Negotiation Project, a group that deal continually with all levels of negotiations and conflict resolutions from domestic to business to international, Getting to Yes tells you how to: ?????? Separate the people from the problem ?????? Focus on interests, not positions ?????? Work together to create opinions that will satisfy both parties ?????? negotiate successfully with people who are more powerful, refuse to play by the rules, or resort to "dirty tricks" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
 

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hola.. imprimelo, leelo y guardalo

Contents

I
15
II
19
III
33
IV
113
V
161
VI
165
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About the author (2008)

Roger Fisher is Samuel Williston Professor of Law, Emeritus, Harvard Law School and founder of the Harvard Negotiation Project. He is also a founder of Conflict Management, Inc., and the Conflict Management Group, two consulting organizations devoted to strategic advice and negotiation training.

William L. Ury, a consultant, writer, and lecturer on negotiation, is associate director of the Harvard Negotiation Project.

Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen teach at the Harvard Law School and the Harvard Negotiation Project, the group that produced the international bestseller "Getting to YES!" They have consulted to businesspeople, governments, organizations, communities, and individuals around the world, from the various parties to the negotiations on constitutional transition in South Africa to schoolteachers in Medellin, Colombia, to community leaders and the police department in Springfield, Massachusetts. They have written on negotiation and communications in publications ranging from "The New York Times" to "Parents" magazine. Bruce Patton is also coauthor of "Getting to YES!

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