To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism

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PublicAffairs, 2013 - 432 pages
2 Reviews
In the very near future, “smart” technologies and “big data” will allow us to make large-scale and sophisticated interventions in politics, culture, and everyday life. Technology will allow us to solve problems in highly original ways and create new incentives to get more people to do the right thing. But how will such “solutionism” affect our society, once deeply political, moral, and irresolvable dilemmas are recast as uncontroversial and easily manageable matters of technological efficiency? What if some such problems are simply vices in disguise? What if some friction in communication is productive and some hypocrisy in politics necessary? The temptation of the digital age is to fix everything—from crime to corruption to pollution to obesity—by digitally quantifying, tracking, or gamifying behavior. But when we change the motivations for our moral, ethical, and civic behavior we may also change the very nature of that behavior. Technology, Evgeny Morozov proposes, can be a force for improvement—but only if we keep solutionism in check and learn to appreciate the imperfections of liberal democracy. Some of those imperfections are not accidental but by design.

Arguing that we badly need a new, post-Internet way to debate the moral consequences of digital technologies, To Save Everything, Click Here warns against a world of seamless efficiency, where everyone is forced to wear Silicon Valley’s digital straitjacket.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nnschiller - LibraryThing

This is a book people who work in technology or read technology should read. Morozov has a perspective that is both important and timely. That said, he's a bit of an ass and that really complicates ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - BJasmine - LibraryThing

Morozov refers to Silicon Valley as some sort of behemoth entity, with allocated resources and rights to major aspects of individual behaviours. If there is a wider context for this book, such as ... Read full review

Contents

Title Page
CHAPTER ONE Solutionism and Its Discontents
Kooks and Cooks
CHAPTER TWO The flonsense of the Internetand How to Stop
CHAPTER THREE So Open It Hurts
CHAPTER FOUR How to Break Politics by Fixing
CHAPTER FIVE The Perils of Algorithmic Gatekeeping
Surviving Big Data
CHAPTER SEVEN Galtons iPhone
CHAPTER EIGHT The Superhuman Condition
Phantoms and Backpacks
Gami or
CHAPTER NINE Smart Gadgets Dumb Humans
Postscript
Notes
Acknowledgments

CHAPTER SIX Less Crime More Punishment

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About the author (2013)

Evgeny Morozov (@evgenymorozov) is the author of The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom, a New York Times Notable Book of 2011 and winner of Harvard’s Kennedy School’s 2012 Goldsmith Book Prize. He is a senior editor to The New Republic. His articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Financial Times, the Economist, the Wall Street Journal, the London Review of Books, and many other publications. His monthly column comes out in Slate, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (Germany), El Pais (Spain), Corriere della Sera (Italy), and several other newspapers. He was born in Belarus.

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