Elements of the History of Philosophy and Science: From the Earliest Authentic Records to the Commencement of the Eighteenth Century

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B.J. Holdsworth, 1827 - 560 páginas
 

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Página 516 - Were it fit to trouble thee with the history of this Essay, I should tell thee, that five or six friends meeting at my chamber, and' discoursing on a subject very remote from this, found themselves quickly at a stand, by the difficulties that rose on every side.
Página 19 - And he spake three thousand proverbs: and his songs were a thousand and five. And he spake of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall: he spake also of beasts, and of fowl, and of creeping things, and of fishes.
Página 441 - ... he who ruleth his own spirit is greater than he who taketh a city...
Página 516 - I should tell thee, that five or six friends meeting at my chamber, and discoursing on a subject very remote from this, found themselves quickly at a stand, by the difficulties that rose on every side. After we had awhile puzzled ourselves, without coming any nearer a resolution of those doubts which perplexed us, it came into my thoughts that we took a wrong course; and that before we set ourselves upon inquiries of that nature, it was necessary to examine our own abilities, and see what objects...
Página 517 - Some hasty and undigested thoughts, on a subject I had never before considered, which I set down against our next meeting, gave the first entrance into this discourse, which, having been thus begun by chance, was continued by entreaty ; written by incoherent parcels ; and, after long intervals of neglect, resumed again, as my humour or occasions permitted ; and at last, in a retirement, where an attendance on my health gave me leisure, it was brought into that order thou now seest it.
Página 56 - But if courtesy and urbanity ^ a love of poetry and eloquence, and the practice of exalted virtues, be a juster measure of perfect society, we.
Página 39 - The fundamental tenet of the Vedanta school consisted not in denying the existence of matter, that is, of solidity, impenetrability and extended figure (to deny which would be lunacy), but in correcting the popular notion of it, and in contending that it has no essence independent of mental perception, that existence and perceptibility are convertible terms, that external appearances and sensations are illusory, and would vanish into nothing, if the divine energy, which alone sustains them, were...
Página 184 - In some new figure, and a varied vest ; Thus all things are but altered, nothing dies, And here and there the unbodied spirit flies, By time, or force, or sickness dispossest, And lodges, where it lights, in man or beast...
Página 46 - A firm belief that One Supreme God made the world by his power, and continually governed it by his providence; a pious fear, love, and adoration of him; a due reverence for parents and aged persons ; a fraternal affection for the whole human species, and a compassionate tenderness even for the brute creation.
Página 47 - Persia : their fundamental tenets are, that nothing exists absolutely but God ; that the human soul is an emanation fi-om his essence, and though divided for a time from its heavenly source, will be finally reunited with it ; that the highest possible happiness...

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