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PAGR
On the Disadvantages of not being a Dwarf .

326
Original Good Woman, the . . . . . . . .

330

Our Village as it Ought to Be

346

Our Village as it Is. . . .

Outward and the Inner Life, the

506

Plea for our Climate, a . . .

241

Plea for the World Below Stairs .

216

Poor Man's Coat, the . . ,

397

Present and the Future, the

543

Press and the People, the . .

253

Railway and Royalty . .

236

Religion and Industry

366

Rights of the Pocket, the .

537

Romeward Bound, the

134

Researches in Belgravia, or the Works and Wonders of the West . 433, 515

Reviews of New Books :-

America ; its Realities and Resources. By Francis Wyse, Esq. . 563

Antonio Perez and Philip the Second , . i

i

377

Ballad Romances. By R. H. Horne . . . . . . 181

Baron's Yule Feast, the ,

. i . .

189

Bells and Pomegranates.--No. VIII, and Last : Luria, and a Sonl's

Tragedy. By Robert Browning, Author of Paracelsus" . . 573
Black Gown Papers, the. By L. Mariotte :

574
Citizen of Prague, the . . . . . . .

186
Complete Concordance to Shakspeare . .. .
Confessions of a Pretty Woman .

477
Confessions of an Homeopathist .

185
Discoveries in Australia. By T. Lort Stokes, Commander, R.N. 569
Dunster Castle . . . . . .

93

. . .
Earl of Gowrie, the, a Tragedy. .

119
Embassy, the, or the Key of a Mystery.

498
Emilia Wyndham. By the Author of "Two Old Men's Tales,"

“ Mount Sorel," &c. . . . . . .

Enchanted Rock, the . . . . . . . . . 191

Essays on Subjects connected with Literature . . . . . 472

Essay on the Character of Macbeth .

474

Eventful Epoch, the, or the Fortunes of Archer Clive . . . 188
Mystery, the . .
. . .

184
Female's Friend, the . . . . .

. 184
Forest and Game Law Tales . .

. . 93, 192, 285
Harding's Fables for Young Folks . .
Hints on the Study of the Law. For practical Guidance of Articles
and Unarticled Clerks. By Francis Edward Slack ..

575

History of Civilisation. By William Alex. Mackinnon, F.R.S., M.P. 567

Life of Carl Theodore Körner . . . . . . : 85
Life and Correspondence of David Hume . . .

383

Life of the Right Honourable George Canning. By Robert Bell,

Author of “ The History of Russia," “ Lives of English Poets," &c. 571

Lives of the Kings of England, from the Norman Conquest. By
Thomas Roscoe, Esq. : : : :

: : 564

Livonian Tales. By the Author of “ Letters from the Baltie" :

from the Baltic". . 572

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192

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Reviews of New Books (continued) :-
Lord of Burghley, the, a Play in Five Acts .

191
La Soubretto
Legends of the Isles. .
Margaret ; or, the Golden Mine .
Narrative of a Four Months' Residence amongst the Natives of' a Valley
of the Marquesas Islands . . .

380
Nuns of Minsk, the . . . .

383
Oliver Cromwell's Letters and Speeches.

182
Over Population and its Remedy .

378
Paula Monti; or, the Hotel Lambert

93
Peers and Parvenus, a Novel. (By Mrs. Gore).

374
Poems. By Thomas Hood - . . .
Poems. By Thomas Powell . . .

95
Pomfret; or, Public Opinion and Private Judgment . .
Prying of a Postman, the . . . . .
Purgatory of Suicides
. 30501s . . .

95
Report of an Educational Tour in Germany . .

376
Roscoe's Life and Pontificate of Leo the Tenth'. . .
Schlegel's Lectures on the Philosophy of History . .

379
Self-Teaching French Grammar, the. By J. Tourrier, French Master
at Westminster School, &c.,

.

575
Sir Roger de Coverley, a Tale of the Court of Charles the Second . 287
Sketches from Flemish Life

185
Superstition and History of the Middle Ages . . . . . 472
Spirit of German Poctry .

84
. . . . . . . .
Tales from the German . .

285
Tales from Boccaccio .

286
. .
Western Clearings .

285
. . .
Wigwam and the Cabin

285
Queen's Lieges, a Romance.
Queen of Denmark, the . .

186
Short Story of the Allotment System.

164
Standard of Progress .

111
“Song of the Shirt, the"

555
Spirit Voice, the

67
. . .
Star in the Dark, a

. . . . . . . . . . 543
Theodore Hook's Grave .

109
Things of Importance .

349
Time versus Malthus, the Last Verdict.

441
To-day .

223
. . . . .
Under the Greenwood Tree.

354
C'se of Fools, the . . .

193

. .
Victory, a . . .

422
Vision, a . . .

58
Winter Scene . .

452
Winter Robin . . . . . . . .

29
Wives of Great Men.

335
Worth of Statesmanship, the . . . . . .

147
Y* Three Voyces i . . . . . . . . . 365

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List of Ellustrations.

BY JOHN LEECH.

PAGE

PLATE XIII. “ The door yielding to the instruments, opens with a

dull sudden sound?"

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XV. " All right," cried Blast, from his sonorous chest, and

he stiffened the cords of his visage . . . . 292

he sti

XVI. “ Mr. Crossbone,” cried St. James, you are a man of the

world " . . . . . . . . . 393

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DOUGLAS JERROLD'S
SHILLING MAGAZINE.

THE HISTORY OF ST. GILES AND ST. JAMES. *

BY THE EDITOR.

CHAPTER XXII. JINGO was born for greatness. He had in his character the great element of a great general-a great statesman , marvellous selfpossession. Meaner boys would have been in a flutter of impatience; not 80. with the pupil of Tom Blast. Hence, he sat under the bed, with critical ear, listening to the hard breathing of the drunken man, who soon began to snore with such discordant vehemence that Jingo feared the sleeper might awaken his bottle friend, Mr. Folder. Jingo knew it not ; but his testimony would have been very valuable to Mrs. Tangle ; for the snoring of her husband was one of the disquietudes of that all-suffering woman ; the rather, too, that the man constantly denied his tendency to the habit. He never snored. Of course not; nobody ever does. Now Jingo might have been a valuable witness on the side of Mrs. Tangle, who could never succeed, talk as she would, in impressing her husband with a sense of his infirmity. On the contrary, her accusation was wont to be repelled as a gross slander ; an imputation unworthy of a wife and a woman. It is bad enough to endure an evil, but to have the nuisance treated as a malicious fiction, makes it intolerable. And Mrs. Tangle felt it so. Of this, however, by the way. Return we to Jingo.

With knowing delicate ear, the child continued to listen to the stertorous agent. At length, the boy crept from beneath the bed, and treading lightly as a fairy at a bridal couch, he made his way to the window. Now, had anybody attempted to open it for any

* Continued from p. 500, Vol. II. NO. XIII.--VOL. III.

honest purpose—had Molly, the maid, for instance, sought to raise it merely to give her opinion of the moon and the night to any rustic astronomer below-it is very certain, that the window would have stuck, and jarred, and rattled ; it was too old and crazy to be made a comfortable confidant in any such foolish business. Ten to one, but it had waked the mistress of the Olive Branch, who would inevitably have nudged the master. And now a robbery was to be done-a most tremendous robbery—perhaps, to be further solemnised by homicide-for who should say that the Parcæ who wove the red tape of the life of Tangle, attorney-atlaw, were not about to snip it ?—who shall say that so awful a crisis did not at that moment impend—and yet silently went the window up ; easily, .smoothly, as though greased by some witch ; smeared with fat “ from murderer's gibbet." It is a pity that the devil makes evil so very easy to the meanest understanding.

Two or three minutes passed, not more, and Tom Blast thrust his head and one of his legs into the chamber. There was a grim smile upon his face-a murderous simper at his mouth-a brassy brightness in his eyes, that showed him to be upon a labour of love. No soldier ever scaled a wall, to receive, it may be, a bullet or a bayonet, with the after-leaf of laurel that the Gazette punctually lets fall upon his grave—no hero, we say, his nerves strung with shouts, his heart beating to the beating drums, his blood boiling at slaughter heat, his whole soul breathing fire and gunpowder, and all to gloriously slay and sack, and burn, no such adventurous plumed biped ever looked more grimly beautiful than did that low-thoughted burglar, that leprous-minded thief. Strange and mournful this to think of! For what was there good or noble to make his muscles iron? What holy flame of patriotism raged in his heart, refining its grossness—what laurel could he hope for, wet with a nation's tears, nations always weeping when the private soldier falls ? He had none of these exalting elements to sublimate him, for a time, into an immortal imp of glory. His motive was gold ; brutalising gold! His enemy, if he came to close quarters, a weak, wine-soddened old man. His fate, if he should fail, no laurel wreath, but suffocating rope. And yet, we say, the conceit of poor humanity! We feel humbled for our nature, but we must declare the truth. Well, then, Thomas Blast, prepared for robbery, and it might be, bloodshed, looked as horribly animated-as ferociously happy-as though he had mounted

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