The planter's guide: or, a practical essay on the best method of giving immediate effect to wood, by the removal of large trees and underwood ; ... originally intended for the climate of Scotland

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Murray, 1828 - 473 páginas
 

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Página 357 - for God had thrown That mountain as his garden-mound, high rais'd Upon the rapid current; which, through veins Of porous earth, with kindly thirst updrawn, Rose a fresh fountain, and with many a rill Water'd the Garden ; thence united fell Down the
Página 357 - —From that sapphire fount, the crisped brooks. Rolling on orient pearl, and sands of gold, With mazy error, under pendent shades, Ran nectar, visiting each plant, and fed Flow'rs worthy Paradise; which not nice art In beds and curious knots, but nature boon, Pour'd forth profuse on hill, and dale, and plain, Both where the morning sun first warmly smote The open
Página 357 - Paradise; which not nice art In beds and curious knots, but nature boon, Pour'd forth profuse on hill, and dale, and plain, Both where the morning sun first warmly smote The open
Página 357 - which, through veins Of porous earth, with kindly thirst updrawn, Rose a fresh fountain, and with many a rill Water'd the Garden ; thence united fell Down the deep glade, and met the
Página 356 - in this pleasant soil His far more pleasant Garden God ordain'd. Out of the fertile ground he caus'd to grow All trees of noblest kind for sight, smell, taste.
Página 85 - Fourthly, their greater number and variety of Roots are for the double purpose of nourishment and strength; nourishment to support a mass of such magnitude, and strength to contend with the fury of the blast. Such are the obvious purposes, for which these unvarying
Página 125 - its boughs, and thus transfers it to its new situation. Under these circumstances, we may presume, that some props or fastenings, whether of wood or cordage, may be requisite, especially about the equinox, to preserve the Tree in an upright position. Now, will not all the evils, ascribed by Miller to the Mutilating system, independently altogether
Página 318 - will observe a bold Promontory or headland (See Frontispiece, Plate I.), situated on the right-hand side, near the Bridge, which was seen by the Committee of the Highland Society. This prominent spot was wooded in 1817, by an open disposition of Trees, Twenty-two in number, and consisting mostly of Sycamores, with a few Oaks and Elms interspersed.
Página 463 - and even of the Oak, to three and four feet in length, and upwards. This plantation, which has all the natural luxuriance and wild richness of a natural Copse, intermingled with Grove or Standard Trees, had been formed only four' years ; and we are confident, that no less a space than from
Página 107 - to vegetation, it is particularly worthy of notice, as already observed, that the Epidermis and Bark of Trees, drawn up by shelter, are usually thin, the former often smooth and glossy. The descending-vessels, by consequence, as they lie under it, never fail to suffer severely, on being exposed to a cold atmosphere. It is

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