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The kitten spits and lifts her back, | “Alas!” she said, “I have no food,

Her eyes glare on the stranger; For boiling or for baking ;"
The old cat's tail ruffs big and black, “I've food," quoth he, "for you and
Loud barks the old dog Ranger! I me;"

And gavo his sack a shaking.
Blue burns at last the tardy match,

And dim the candle glimmers; Out rattled knives and forks and Along the floor, beside the door,

spoons, The cold white moonlight shim | Twelve eggs, potatoes plenty; mers.

One large soup dish, two plates of

fish, "Sit down,”-the widow gives her

And bread enough for twenty, chair ; "Get out!” she says to Ranger ; And Rachel, calming her surprise "Alas ! I do not know your name;". As well as she was able,

“No matter," quoth the stranger. Saw, following these, two roasted His limbs are strong, his beard is

geese,

A tea-urn, and a table.
long,
His hair is dark and wavy;
Jpon his back he bears a sack;

Strange, was it not ? Each dish was

hot, His staff is stout and heavy.

Not e'en a plate was broken; My way is lost, and with the frost The cloth was laid, and all arrayed, I feel my fingers tingle;"

Before a word was spoken! Then from his back he slips the sack

“Sit up! sit up! and we will sup, Ho! did you hear it jingle ?

Dear madam, while we're able"

Said she, “The room is poor and Nay, keep your chair; while you

small sit there,

For such a famous table.” I'll take the other corner;" I'm sorry, sir, I have no fire;" Again the stranger shakes the sack; T"No matter, Mrs. Warner.”

The walls begin to rumble; He shakes his sack-the magic sack;

Another shake,—the rafters quake!

You'd think the roof would tumAmazed the widow gazes ! Ho, ho! the chimney's full of wood; Ha, ha! the wood it blazes.

Shake! shake! The room grows high Ho, ho! ha, ha! the merry fire,

and large, It sputters and it crackles;

The walls are painted over; Snap, snap! flash, flash! old oak | Shake, shake! out fall four chairs, and ash

in all, Send out a million sparkles.

A bureau, and a sofa.
The stranger sits upon his sack
Beside the chimney-corner,

The stranger stops to wipe the And rubs his hands before the

sweat

That down his face is streaming; brands,

“ Sit up! sit up! and we will sup," And smiles on Mrs. Warner.

Quoth he," while all is steaming." She feels her heart beat fast with

The widow hobbled on her crutch, But what can be the danger ?

He kindly sprang to aid her, "Can I do naught for you, kind " All this,” said she, “is too much sir?"

for me;" “I'm hungry," quoth the stranger. | Quoth he, “We'll have a waiter."

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Farewell to many who walked the year with us !—to the companion that was to us as an angel of God, and is now an angel with God! Farewell to the babe that was ours, and is God's, and therefore more than ever ours, though beyond the reach of our arms! But the heart tends it yet, and cradles it more vigilantly than ever. Farewell to our Christian brethren, who have heard the trumpet before us, and gone forward! Year, thy march is ending! Thy work is done! Pass! Disappear! We shall see thee no more, until, reascending, we shall behold thy record in the All-judging Day!

THE WONDERFUL SACK. THE apple-boughs half hid the house | One evening she had closed he Where lived the lonely widow;

book, Behind it stood the chestnut wood, But still she sat there knitting;..

Before it spread the meadow. “ Meow-meow !" complained the old She had no money in her till,

black cat; She was too poor to borrow;

“Mew-mew!” the spotted kitten With her lame leg she could not beg, And on the hearth, with sobei

And no one cheered her sorrow. mirth, She had no wood to cook her food, | “ Chirp, chirp!” replied th And but one chair to sit in:

cricket, Last spring she lost her cow, that 'Twas dark-but hark !” “Bow cost

ow!” the bark A whole year's steady knitting. Of Ranger at the wicket. She had worn her fingers to the

Is Ranger barking at the moon? bone,

Or what can be the matter?
Her back was growing double;
One day the pig tore up her wig-

| What trouble now ? “Bow-ow! bowi

ow!”But that's not half her trouble.

She hears the old gate clatter. Her best black gown was faded brown,

“It is the wind that bangs the gate, Her shoes were all in tatters,

And I must knit my stocking!” With not a pair for Sunday wear;

But hush !-what's that ? Rat-tat! Said she, “It little matters!

rat-tat! “Nobody asks me now to ride,

Alas! there's some one knocking My garments are not fitting;

“Dear me! dear me! who can it bei And with my crutch I care not much

Where, where is my crutch To hobble off to meeting.

handle?" “I still preserve my Testament, She rubs a match with hast)

And though the Acts are missing, scratch, And Irike is torn, and Hebrews She cannot light the candle:

worn, On Sunday 'tis a blessing.

Rat-tat! scratch, scratch ! the worth

less match! “And other days I open it

The cat growls in the corner : Before me on the table,

Rat-tat! scratch, scratch! Up flies And there I sit and read and knit,

the latchAs long as I am able.”

“Good evening, Mrs. Warner.”

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long,

The kitten spits and lifts her back, | “Alas!" she said, "I have no food,

Her eyes glare on the stranger; For boiling or for baking;” The old cat's tail ruffs big and black, | “I've food,” quoth he, "for you and Loud barks the old dog Ranger!

And gave his sack a shaking. Blue burns at last the tardy match,

And dim the candle glimmers; Out rattled knives and forks and Along the floor, beside the door,

spoons, The cold white moonlight shim Twelve eggs, potatoes plenty; mers.

One large soup dish, two plates of

fish, "Sit down,"—the widow gives her

And bread enough for twenty, chair; "Get out!” she says to Ranger; And Rachel, calming her surprise "Alas ! I do not know your name;" As well as she was able,

“No matter," quoth the stranger. | Saw, following these, two roasted His limbs are strong, his beard is geese,

A tea-urn, and a table.
His hair is dark and wavy;
Upon his back he bears a sack;

Strange, was it not ? Each dish was

hot, His staff is stout and heavy.

Not e'en a plate was broken; "My way is lost, and with the frost The cloth was laid, and all arrayed, I feel my fingers tingle;"

Before a word was spoken! Then from his back The slips the sack

“ Sit up! sit up! and we will sup, Ho! did you hear it jingle ?

Dear madam, while we're able;"

Said she, “The room is poor and "Nay, keep your chair; while you

small

For such a famous table.” I'll take the other corner;" "I'm sorry, sir, I have no fire;"

Again the stranger shakes the sack; "No matter, Mrs. Warner."

The walls begin to rumble; He shakes his sack-the magic sack;

Another shake, the rafters quake! Amazed the widow gazes !

You'd think the roof would tumHo, ho! the chimney's full of wood;

ble. Ha, ha! the wood it blazes.

Shake! shake! The room grows high Ho, ho ! ha, ha! the merry fire,

and large, It sputters and it crackles;

The walls are painted over; Snap, snap! flash, flash! old oak Shake, shake! out fall four chairs, and ash

in all, Send out a million sparkles.

A bureau, and a sofa.
The stranger sits upon his sack
Beside the chimney-corner,

The stranger stops to wipe the And rubs his hands before the

sweat brands,

That down his face is streaming; And smiles on Mrs. Warner.

“ Sit up! sit up! and we will sup,"

Quoth he, “while all is steaming." She feels her heart beat fast with

The widow hobbled on her crutch, But what can be the danger ?

He kindly sprang to aid her, "Can I do naught for you, kind “ All this,” said she, “is too much sir?"

for me;" "I'm hungry," quoth the stranger. | Quoth he, “We'll have a waiter."

sit there,

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Shake, shake, once more ! and from That out of peace and pure content the sack

| Springs every earthly blessing." Out popped a little fellow,' With eībows bare, bright eyes, sleek

Said she, “I'll make the sack my hair,

own; And trowsers striped with yellow.

I'll shake away all sorrow;".

She shook the sack for me to-day; His legs were short, his body She'll shake for you to-morrow.

plump,
His cheek was like a cherry;

She shakes out hope and joy and He turned three times; he gave a '

peace,

And happiness comes after ; jump;

| She shakes out smiles for all the His laugh rang loud and merry.

world; He placed his hand upon his heart, | She shakes out love and laughter.

And scraped and bowed so handy; 1 For poor and rich no matter “ Your humble servant, sir,” he

which said, Like any little dandy.

For young folks or for old folks,

For strong and weak, for proud and The widow laughed a long, loud meek, laugh,

For warm folks and for cold folks. And up she started, screaming; When ho! and lo! the room was

For children coming home from dark !

school, She had been asleep and dream

And sometimes for the teacher; ing.

For white and black, she shakes the

sack The stranger and his magic sack, In short, for every creature.

The dishes and the fishes, The geese and things had taken | And everybody who has grief, wings,

The sufferer and the mourner, Like riches, or like witches,

From far and near, come now to

hear All, all was gone. She sat alone;

Kind words from Mrs. Warner. Her hands had dropped their knitting;

They go to her with heavy hearts, “Meow-meow!” the cat upon the They come away with light ones ; mat;

They go to her with cloudy brows, “ Mew-mew ! mew-mew!" the They come away with bright ones. kitten.

All love her well, and I could tell The hearth is bleak—and hark! the Of many a cheering present creak

Of fruits and things their friendship “ Chirp, chirp!” the lonesome

brings, cricket;

To make her fireside pleasant. “Bow-ow !” says Ranger to the

She always keeps a cheery fire; moon;

The house is painted over; The wind is at the wicket.

She has food in store, and chairs for And still she sits, and as she knits

four, She pondered o'er the vision;

A bureau, and a sofa. “I saw it written on the sack,

She says these seem just like her 'A CHEERFUL DISPOSITION.'

dream, “ I know God sent the dream, and | And tells again the vision; meant

“I saw it written on the sack, To teach this useful lesson,

• A. CHEERFUL DISPOSITION !""

WHERE TO LEAVE OUR TROUBLES. 1 As the angel of mercy flew over earth at midnight, he saw so many

forms of sorrow, heard so many groans of pain, listened to so many sighs of distress, that his heart was moved and saddened. He went and laid his sadness at the feet of Jesus on the throne.

“Go back," said the sweet voice, “ go back and visit each one of those sufferers, and see if they need suffer as they do."

Down again to the earth the swift angel flew, and entered a small, humble dwelling. He paused and stood in the chamber door. On the bed lay a dying father. He was pale, and breathed with difficulty. On his breast lay a great bundle. It was evident it was very heavy, and very oppressive. He could not get it off. Presently the angel saw a hand close by the bed, holding a large sack in the shape of the human heart, and on it was written, “ Cast in all thy cares, for He careth for thee.'' The writing was in letters of light, large and plain. The poor man put his trembling hand into the bundle and took out a handful, marked, " Anxieties for my poor wife.” Slowly and tremblingly he cast it in. Then he took another, marked, “ Distress for my orphan children.” He threw that also in, and his load was lighter. Once more he took up another parcel, marked, “O my aged father and mother!” Slowly he dropped it into the sack. Then he seemed to be frightened at what he bad done, and tried to reach down and take these several burdens. But no ! the hand withdrew the sack, and he could not take them back. Then his breathing became soft and easy, his face lit up with smiles, his heart beat with hope, and he died in peace and joy, “casting all his cares on Him who cared for him !”

Next the angel of mercy entered a magnificent dwelling. Softly they were treading upon the rich Turkey carpet; with velvet step and low breathing, they were gathering around the couch of a beautiful, dying child. Near the little sufferer stood the mother, pale, tearless, wringing her hands in agony. Her child she knew must die-was dying. Slowly and gently the hand held up the heart-sack, and she read, “ Cast all your cares upon Him, for He careth for you.” In a moment she threw in her sorrows, her griefs, and her agonies ; but before she could feel relief, she suddenly stooped down and snatched them up again, and laid them on her own heart. A tender voice seemed to say, “ Cast in, cast in, and thou shalt be comforted.” But she would not. She said she had cast in all her cares, and wondered why she was not comforted.” Poor weeper! She forgot that we must leave our cares with Him as well as cast them upon Him.

Again, the angel stood in the study of a minister of Christ. It was Sabbath evening, and the wearied man was thinking over the results of another day's sowing, and was crying to his Master, “Lord, who hath believed our report, and to whom hath the arm of the Lord been revealed ? When will the harvest day come ?" The voice spoke to him, “ Be not weary in well doing," "In due season you will reap if you faint not.

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