Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

other Senator, the chair shall submit the question in this form, "Shall the main question now be put?” This shall be order only by a majority of the Senators present and voting. The effect of ordering the previous question shall be to instantly close debate and bring the Senate to an immedate vote on the pending question or questions in their regular order. The motion for the previous question may be limited by the mover to one or more of the questions preceding the main question itself, in which case the form shall be, "Shall the question, as limited, be now put?” The yeas and nays may be demanded on any vote under this rule, and a motion for a call of the Senate shall be in order at any time prior to the ordering of the previous question. Any question of order of appeal from the decision of the chair, pending the previous question, shall be decided without debate. When the question is on a motion to reconsider, under the operatiun of the previous question, and it is decided in the affirmative, the previous question shall have no operation upon the question to be reconsidered. If the Senate refuses to order the previous question, the consideration of the subject shall be resumed, as if no motion therefor had been made.

Appeals.

Rule 66. Any Senator may appeal from any decision of the chair. On all appeals the question shall be: "Shall the decision of the chair stand as the judgment of the Senate?Appeals shall be debatable except when the Senate is under the operation of the previous question or the decision appealed from relates to priority of business.

Laying Appeal on Table.

Rule 67. An appeal may be laid on the table, but shall not carry with it the subject matter before the Senate at the time such appeal is taken. Executive Session.

Rule 68. On motion made and carried to shut the doors of the Senate on the discussion of any business which may, in the opinion of any Senator, require secrecy, or on motion made and carried, that the Senate go into executive session, the President shall direct all persons, except the Senators, Secretaries and the Sergeant-at-Arms, to withdraw; and during the executive session and the discussion of said motion, the doors shall remain shut and every Senator and officer shall keep secret all such matters, proceedings and things whereof the secrecy shall be enjoined by order of the Senate.

Journal of Executive Sessions.

Rule 69. Whenever the Senate shall go into consideration of executive business the proceedings of the Senate in such business shall be kept in a separate Journal, which shall not be inspected by any others than members of the Senate, unless otherwise ordered. Such Journal shall be published after the close of the session, at the end of the regular Journal of the proceedings of the Senate, unless otherwise ordered.

Contested Elections

Rule 70. In cases of contested elections, notice setting forth the grounds of such contest shall be given by the contestant to the Senate within three days of actual session after the Senate first convenes; and in such case the contest shall be determined as speedily as reasonably possible and neither the contestee nor contestant shall have the right to draw any per diem, mileage or other allowance, until such contest shall be determined, and then only the person decided to be entitled to the seat shall be paid per diem, mileage or other allowance.

Endorsement on Petitions Presented.

Rule 71. Before any petition or memorial addressed to the Senate shall be received and read, a brief statement of the contents thereof shall be endorsed on the same, with the name of the Senator presenting it.

Certain Questions Not Debatable.

Rule 72. All questions relating to the priority of business shall be decided without debate.

Proceedings When Senator Is Called to Order.

Rule 73. When a Senator shall be called to order he shall take his seat until the President shall have determined whether he is in order, and every question of order shall be decided by the President, subject to an appeal to the Senate by any Senator; and if a Senator be called to order for words spoken, the exceptional words shall be immediately taken down in writing. Persons Entitled to Privilege of the Floor,

Rule 74. No person shall be admitted within the bar of the Senate-unless by invitation of the President or a Senator-except the Governor, State Officers, Senators and Representatives in Congress, members of the House, ex-Senators, or any former incumbent of said offices respectively.

Amendment or Repeal of Senate Rules.

Rule 75. At least one day's notice shall be given of a motion to amend or repeal any of the Senate rules, which notice shall set forth in full the amendment proposed, and shall be entered in the Journal. Cushing's Law and Practice.

Rule 76. The rules of parliamentary practice comprised in "Cushing's Law and Practice of Legislative Assemblies," shall govern in all cases in which they are not inconsistent with the standing rules and orders of the Senate.

The resolution was adopted.

Message From The House.

A message was received from the House of Representatives informing the Senate that the House has elected Fred B. Wells, Speaker; Robert B. MacDonald, Speaker pro tempore; Charles S. Pierce, Clerk, and Frank B. Clemmens, Sergeantat-Arms.

A message was received from the House of Representatives transmitting
House concurrent resolution No. 1.
A resolution providing for a joint convention of the House and the Senate.

Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That the Senate and House of Representatives meet in joint convention in the Hall of the House or Representatives, January 8, 1925, at 1 o'clock p. m., to receive the message of the Governor.

The message informed the Senate that the House had adopted the concurrent resolution, action in which the concurrence of the Senate is respectfully asked.

Pending the order that, under rule 59, the concurrent resolution lie over one day,

Mr. Wood moved that rule 59 be suspended.
The motion prevailed.
The concurrent resolution was then considered and adopted.
A message was received from the House of Representatives transmitting .
House Concurrent Resolution No. 2.
A resolution providing for the mailing of the daily Journals.

Resolved by the House. (the Senate concurring), That copies of the daily Journals of the Senate and House be mailed as follows:

1. By the Secretary of the Senate, to not more than twenty-five persons designated by each Senator;

2. By the Clerk of the House of Representatives, to not more than fifteen persons designated by each representative.

3. By the Secretary of the Senate and by the Clerk of the House of Representatives, in their discretion, to Granges, Local Arbors of Gleaners, Farmers, Clubs,

public officials, newspapers, State Institutions, public schools, and citizens, on request there or;

Such sums as are necessary for postage to meet the requirements of this resolution shall be certified by the Secretary of the Senate or the Clerk of the House of Representatives and paid by the State Treasurer on the Warrant of the Auditor General. The Secretary of the Senate or the Clerk of the House of Representatives, whenever purchasing postage stamps for the mailing of Journals as herein authorized, shall procure receipts in duplicate, signed by the postmaster of Lansing, for the amount of said purchase, one of which receipts shall be filed with the Auditor General and the other shall be retained in his office.

The message informed the Serate that the House of Representatives had adopted the concurrent resolution; in which action the concurrence of the Senate was requested.

Pending the order that, under rule 59, the concurrent reso!ution lie over one day, Mr Whiteley moved that rule 59 be suspended. The motion prevailed. The concurrent resolution was then considered and adopted.

A message was received from the House of Representatives transmitting
House Concurrent Resolution No. 3.

A resolution providing for the election of a Postmaster and Assistant Postmaster of the Legislature.

Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That Ira G. Ormsbee be and is hereby elected Postmaster, and Leo J. Holmes be and is hereby elected Assistant Postmaster, for the session of 1925.

The message informed the Senate that the House of Representatives had adopted the concurrent resolution, in which action the concurrence of the Senate is respectfully asked.

Pending the order that, under rule 59, the concurrent resolution lie over one day,

Mr. Brower moved that rule 59 be suspended.
The motion prevailed.
The concurrent resolution was then considered and adopted.

Messages From the House.

A message was received from the House of Representatives returning
Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 1.
Providing for assistance in the Legislative Reference Department.

The message informed the Senate that the House had concurred in the adoption of the concurrent resolution.

A message was received from the House of Representatives returning
Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 2.
Prescribing the Joint Convention rules for the Legislature.

The message informed the Senate that the House had concurred in the adoption of the resolution,

The Senate took' up the order of

Introduction of Bills.

Mr. Wood introduced
Senate bill No. 1, entitled
A bill to divide the State of Michigan into thirty-two senatorial districts

The bill was read a first and second time by its title, ordered printed, and referred to the Committee on Apportionment.

Mr. Wood also introduced
Senate bill No. 2, entitled

A bill to amend section 1 of Act No. 73 of the Public Acts of 1923, entitled "An act to protect fish in the trout streams of this State, and to regulate the manner of taking and transportation of fish from said waters, to provide penalties for violation of this act, and to repeal all acts and parts of acts conflicting therewith," approved April 20, 1923.

The bill was read a first and second time by its title, ordered printed, and referred to the Committee on Conservation.

Mr. Wood also introduced
Senate bill No. 3, entitled

A bill to provide for the establishment and maintenance of courts of record in certain counties of this State, and designated as the Superior Courts; and defining the jurisdiction of such courts, powers, and duties thereof; to fix the number, time and manner of election of judges thereof; to provide a presiding judge; to define the privileges of such presiding judge; to modify the procedure in and classify the actions therein; and to provide for abolishing of certain statutory courts not of record having civil jurisdiction in such counties, in which the provisions of this act become operative, and vesting of the jurisdiction thereof in the court hereby created.

The bill was read a first and second time by its title, ordered printed, and referred to the Cimmittee on Judiciary.

Mr. Wood also introduced
Senate bill No. 4, entitled

A bill to provide for the registration of electors, the nomination and election of candidates for public office; to provide for and regulate primary elections; to guard against the abuse of the elective franchise; to define violations of this act; to prescribe the penalties therefor; to repeal certain acts relating thereto and to provide for the filling of vacancies.

The bill was read a first and second time by its title, ordered printed, and referred to the Committee on Elections.

Mr. Condon introduced
Senate bill No. 5, entitled

A bill to amend section 3 of Act No. 128 of the Public Acts of 1887, entitled “An act for the requiring of a civil license in order to marry, and the due registration of the same, and to provide a penalty for the violation of the provisions of the same," being section 11378 of the Compiled Laws of 1915, as amended by Act No. 195 of the Public Acts of 1917.

The bill was read a first and second time by its title, ordered printed, and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

Mr Condon also introduced
Senate bill No. 6, entitled

A bill to amend sections 1, 7 and 8 of Act No. 369 of the Public Acts of 1919, entitled “An act to supplement existing laws providing for the establishment and maintenance of municipal courts of record and defining the jurisdiction of such courts; to fix the number of judges thereof; to provide a presiding judge; to define the privileges of such presiding judge; to modify the procedure in and extend the jurisdiction of said courts in certain respects, and to provide for the abolishing of any police courts or other courts not of record having exclusive criminal jurisdiction existing in any city in which the provisions of this act become operative," as amended by Act No. 364 of the Public Acts of 1921, approved May 13, 1919.

The bill was read a first and second time by its title, ordered printed, and referred to the Cimmittee on Judiciary.

Mr. B. L. Case introduced
Senate bill No. 7, entitled

A bill to amend sections 55, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 61a, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 70, 72, 73, 73a, 74, 75, 78, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 87, 88, 89, 85, 96, 98, 98a, 99, 101, 102, 103, 105, 106, 113, 122, 124, 125, 127, 127a, 128, 129, 130, 131, 135, 140, 141 and 144 of Act No. 206 of the Public Acts of 1893, entitled “An act to provide for the assessmeit of property, and the levy and collection of taxes thereon, and for the collection of taxes heretofore and hereafter levied, making such taxes a lien on the lands taxed, establishing and continuing such lien, providing for the sale and conveyance of lands delinquent for taxes and for the inspection and disposition of lands bid off ffto the State and not redeemed or purchased; and to repeal Act No. 200 of the Public Acts of 1891, and all other acts and parts of acts in anywise contravening any of the provisions of this act," the same being sections 4051, 4053, 4054, 4055, 4056, 4057, 4058, 4059, 4060, 4061, 4062, 4063, 4064, 4067, 4069, 4070, 4071, 4072, 4073, 4076, 4079, 3080, 4081, 4082, 4083, 4085, 4086, 4087, 4093, 4094, 4096, 4097, 4098, 4100, 4101, 4102, 4104, 4105, 4112, 4121, 4123, 4124, 4126, 4127, 4128, 4129, 4130, 4134, 4138, 4139 and 413 of the Compiled Laws of 915, as amended, and to add a new section to said act to be known as section 144a.

The bill was read a first and second time by its title, ordered printed, and referred to the Committee on Taxation.

[ocr errors][merged small]

The President announced the appointment of the Standing Committees of the Senate, as follows:

Agriculture-Senators Leland, Horton, Gettel, Herrick, and Hinkley.

Apportionment-Senators Howarth, Atwood, Wood, W.,L. Case, Bohn, Henry Baxter, Bahorski, and Hinkley.

Banks and Corporations-Senators Truettner, Wood, Brower, Hunter, Karcher, Herald, and Greene.

College of Mines-Senators Herald, Wilcox, and B. L. Case.

Conservation-Senators Pearson, Woodruff, Bohn, Karcher, Truettner, Young, Penney, Gettel. and Hinkley.

Education- Senators Bohn, Condon. Wm. L. Case, Greene, and Herald. Elections-Senators Wood, Gansser, B. L. Case, Baxter, and Greene. Executive Business-Senators Butler, Condon, Pearson, Bohn, and Quinlan.

Finance and Appropriations-Senators Brower, Wood, Truettner, Atwood, Pearson, Baxter, and Whiteley,

Highways-Senators Wilcox, Atwood, Gettel, Leland, Martin, Hinkley, and Cummings.

Industrial Schools-Senators Quinlan, Young, and Condon.
Institutions for Blind and Deaf-Senators Martin, Penney, and Cummings.

Insurance-Senators Bahorski, B. L. Case, Gansser, Horton, Whiteley, Howarth, and Herrick.

Judiciary-Senators Condon, Hunter, Bahorski, Penney, Wood, Herald, and Howarth.

Labor-Senators Gettel, Martin, Whiteley, Quinlan, and Cummings.
Michigan Agricultural College--Senators Horton, Hunter, and Woodruff.
Military Affairs-Senators Gansser, Horton, Gettel, Butler, and Baxter.
Normal Schools–Senators Leland, Butler, and Gansser.
Penal Institutions-Senators Cummings, Butler, and Wm. L. Case.
Printing and Expense--Senators Whiteley, Baxter, and Herald.
Prohibition-Senators Young, Penney, Wm. L. Case, Henry, and Herrick.
Public Health-Senators Wm. L. Case, Young, Gansser, Cummings, and Greene.

Rules and Resolutions-Senators Hunter, Atwood, Brower, Pearson, and Woodruff.

Soldiers' Home-Senators Herrick, Henry, and Bohn.

State Affairs-Senators Woodruff, Hunter, Bohn, Wilcox, Young, Quinlan, and Butler.

State Homes--Senators Greene, B. L. Case, and Bahorski.
State Hospitals-Senators Karcher, Howarth, and Herrick.
State Sanitariums-Senators Hinkley, Bahorski, and Gettel.

Taxation-Senators Henry, Baxter, Brower, Condon, Truettner, Leland, and Martin.

Towns and Counties–Senators B. L. Case, Martin, Woodruff, Wilcox, and Karcher.

Transportation-Senators Atwood, Hunter, Wilcox, Karcher, Woodruff, Quinlan, and Howarth.

University-Senators Penney, Howarth, and Henry.

Appointments by the Secretary.

The Secretary of the Senate, pursuant to the requirements of Senate rule No. 10, announced the following appointments:

Second Assistant Secretary-Alice V. Warner.
Proof Reader-Pauline P. Mosier.

« AnteriorContinuar »