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Riogleaders have done the same thing to deceive Adventurers, both in and out of Mexico, and even Citizens of The United States, seducing tbem by false assurances, that their Government was decided to support them, and that it would proceed immediately 10 recognize, as an Independent Power, that band of Highway Robbers and Insurgents.

From the Extract of a Letter from a Person of the greatest veracity and the best character, now forwarded to you, you will observe, that Toledo had deferred his Expedition against the Provinces of the King my Master, as I stated to you in my Note of the 2nd January, as the 1,000 men he expected from Kentucky, and the 300 from Tennessee, could not form a junction with him in less than 24 days; and you will see this information confirmed under a posterior date, advising me, that a number of Americans came down from the States adjacent to Louisiana, to join the Expedition which Toledo had concerted; and that he (Toledo) would carry with him the Engineer Laford, Savary, and one Soubenet.

You will also learn, that provisions and a Carthagenian Flag were sent to the American Brig, the Tom Bowlin, from New York, at the moment of her arrival at the Balize, hy a Gun-boat of The United States, with the object, it would seem, of convoying with her the Vessels which should sail from New Orleans, with munitions of War for the Establishment at the new Port of Tampico; that they had purchased in New Orleans itself 5 other Schooners, which they are actually arming to cruize against the Spanish Couimerce; and that it appears that Mr. John K. West, Merchant of that place, is the Agent for these Vessels; and, finally, that in that City there has been a Revolutionary Junta, at the head of which is Toledo and Herrera, from which has issued the wicked Decree mentioned in these Letters, that 4 bonorable Spaniards should be put to death, for every Revolutionist punished by the established Laws of the Monarchy of the King

my Master.

As respects Doctor Robinson, it is notorious that he has been one of the most infuriate Enemies of Spain, and the one who has, with the greatest eagerness, promoted the rebellion of the Provinces of His Majesty. It was he who introduced himself into the internal Provinces to seduce their Inhabitants-it was he who sowed the seeds of Insurrection-it was he who procured intelligence in St. Antonio de Bexar for Bernardo Gutierrez, that he might possess himself of the Place, and afterwards murder 14 Spanish Chiefs—and it was he who published, in these United States, Proclamations, signed with his hand, ioviting Adventurers from all parts to form an Army, pointing out the places of enlisting men, and the pay of those enlisted; and, in one word, declaring War himself, in a certain mode, against the Spanish Nation, from the very bosom of this Republic; as you will find

more in detail, in the authenticated Copy which accompanies this, the Original of which is in my possession.

I include in the 2nd class, those Individuals who, seduced by the imposture of the principal Authors of these hostile Expeditions, have assisted, from the bosom of this Republic, the Revolutionists of Mexico, some by furnishing them with Arms and munitions of War, others by enlisting themselves, in this Country, in the Army of the Insurgents, which passed over to subvert all order in the Provinces of the King my Master. In this number, are those other Persons whom I have mentioned to you in this and my former Notes. The information which I gave you, respecting some Persons who were preparing hostile Expeditions froin Georgia, against the Possessions of the King my Master, you will find established, officially, by the Governor of East Florida, in his Letter which accompanies this; in which he advises me, that John M'Intoshi and William Criach, who supported the last Insurrection in that Province, in the year 1812, are now recruiting is Georgia a considerable number of Vagabonds, again to invade the Territory under his command.

I fatter myself that this series of acts, so circumstantial, the information of which has been acquired through channels so respectable, will be sufficient to call the attention of the President to the necessity of cutting up by the roots these melancholy abuses, and to shut the door against the continual violent movements of these turbulent People, who, from the bosom of this Republic, make War on a friendly and neighbouring Power. It has never been the intention of the King, my Master, to request that the punishment of the Laws should be inflicted on these Disturbers of social order, when their guilt is not fully proven. On the contrary, I have informed you that the object of His Majesty is not to take vengeance on these Highway Robbers, but to shelter his Subjects from their barbarity. His Majesty has only thought proper to solicit, from the rectitude and circumspection of this Government, what might prevent the crimes which are meditated from taking effect, as otherwise it might be too late to prevent them, as the Offenders will be beyond the territory of a Friend, and at a distance from the arm of the Law. Good order requires, not only that the offences already committed should be punished, but that those which are contemplated should be prevented; and this is the case of the Individuals I have comprehended in the 2nd class. The personal knowledge I have of the rectitude of the President inspires me with a confidence, that he will view the acts I have just stated as I do; and proceeding, in this particular case, with that integrity and humanity which is the most glorious distinction of the American character, he will be pleased 10 adopt those measures which he may believe most analogous to the system which you tell me this Government has adopted, not to mix in these dissensions, and not to permit the Citizens of this Republic to

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take part in them, nor to permit its Territory to be a shelter to Foreigners, who try to make War on a friendly Power.

To the 3rd point in my Notes, intended to solicit from your Government, that Vessels from the insurgent or revolted Provinces of Spanish America should not be admitted into the Ports of the Republic,

,—as well because none of those Provinces are recognized by any Power in the World, as because the obligations of friendship and good neighbourhood demand that we should not in any way contribute to protect Provinces or Subjects who have revolted, you have been pleased to make known to me that the President, observing the change of Government which had taken place among the Revolutionists in Spanish America, had adopted the measure of ordering the Collectors of the Customs to admit every description of Vessel, without regard to her character or Flag, provided she paid the Duties and observed the Laws of the Couutry during the time she was in Port.

With due respect for the measures adopted by the Chief of this Confederation, I cannot do less than state to you, that the changes of Government which have taken place among the Revolutionists of Spanish America, do not appear to me to afford a sufficient motive for altering the friendly conduct towards a Power with whom one is in peace and harmony. You cannot but know, that this measure places these Factionists not only on a footing of equality with the Spanish Nation, but gives them advantages over all Judependent Powers, since, according to the Laws of Neutrality, The United States would not permit any Independent Nation to arm its Vessels in their Ports, nor to sell Prizes in them, as is permitted to these Revolutionists.

By the 2 Acts of Congress, one of the 28th of February, 1806.*

* An Act to suspend the Commercial Intercourse between The United States and

certain parts of the Island of St. Domingo.28th February, 1806. Sec. I. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of The United States of America, in Congress assembled, That all commercial intercourse, between any Person or Persons resident within The United States, and any Person or Persons resident within any part of the Island of St. Domingo, not in possession and under the acknowledged Government of France, shall be, and is hereby prohibited ; and any Ship or Vessel owned, hired, or employed, wholly or in part, by any Person or Persons resident within The United States, and sailing from any Port of The United States, after due notice of this Act at the Custom-houses respectively, which, contrary to the intent hereof, shall be voluntarily carried, or shall be destined to proceed, whether directly or from any intermediate Port or Place, to any Port or Place within the Island of St. Domingo, and not in possession, and under the acknowledged Government of France ; and also any Cargo which shall be found on board of such Ship or Vessel, when detected and interrupted in such unlawful purpose, or at her return from such Voyage to the United States, shall be wholly forfeited, and may be seized and condemned in any Court of The United States having competent jurisdiction.

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That, after due notice of this Act at the soand the other of the 24th of the same month in 1807,+ all commerce with the Rebels of St. Domingo was prohibited, at the request of France. As the Treaties subsisting between Spain and The United States place Spain on the footing of the most favoured Nations, His

Feral Custom-houses, no Ship or Vessel whatever shall receive a clearance for any Port or Place within the Island of St. Domingo, and not in the actual possession of France ; nor shall any clearance be granted for a foreign voyage to any Ship or Vessel owned, hired, or employed, wholly or in part, by any Person or Persons resident within The United States, until the Owner or the Employer for the voyage, or his Factor or Agent, with the Master, shall give bond to The United States, in a sum equal to the value of the Vessel and of her Cargo, with condition that the Ship or Vessel, for which a clearance shall be required, is destined to some Port or Place without the limits of such part of the Island of St. Domingo as shall not be in the actual possession, and under the acknowledged Government of France, and during the intended voyage shall not be voluntarily carried, or permitted to proceed, whether directly or from any intermediate Port or Place, to any Port or Place within such part of the Island of St. Domingo, as shall not be in the actual possession, and under the acknowledged Government of France; and in case of being forced by any casualty into any Port or Place hereby interdicted, shall not, at any such Port or Place, voluntarily sell, deliver, or unlade any part of such Cargo, except so much as may be absolutely necessary to defray the expenses requisite to enable such Vessel to proceed on her intended voyage ; and, generally, that such Ship or Vessel, whilst on such voyage, shall not be employed in any traffic or commerce, with or for any person resident within any part of the Island of St. Domingo not in the actual possession, and under the acknowledged Government of France.

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That all penalties and forfeitures incurred by force of this Act, and which may be recovered, shall be distributed and accounted for in the manner prescribed by the Act, entitled “ An Act to regulate the collection of Jülles on imports and Tonnage,” passed the 2nd day of March, 1799, and may be mitigated or remitted in the manner prescribed by the Act, entitled “ An Act to provide for mitigating or remitting the forfeitures, penalties, and disabilities, accruing in certain cases therein mentioned," passed the 3rd of March, 1797, and made perpetual by an Act passed the 11th of February, 1800.

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That this Act shall continue and be in force for 1 year, and no longer.

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That, at any time after the passing of this Act, it shall be lawful for the President of The United States, if he shall deem it expedient, and consistent with the interest of The United States, by his order to remit and discontinue the restraints and prohibitions on the commerce aforesaid.

(Approved, 28th February, 1806.]

An Act to continue in force for a further time an Act, entitled, An Act to sus. pend the Commercial Intercourse between The United States and certain parts of the Island of St. Domingo.--24th February, 1807.

Sec. 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of The United States of America, in Congress assembled, That the Act, entitled “ An Act to suspend the commercial intercourse between The United States and certain parts of the Island of St. Domingo," passed on the 28th day of February, 1806, be, and the same hereby is, continued in force until the end of the next Session of Congress, and no longer.

Majesty considers himself entitled to expect that this Republic will now adopt in his favour a like measure, during the disturbances in Spanislı America, or for such other period as it may be considered proper to designate. Such is the spirit in which I have made the 3 requests to your Government, stated in my former Noles. I hope that the present observations will merit a favourable reception from the rectitude and wisdom of the President and of yourself. I have given an account to my Government of all these particulars, sending it a Copy of my Notes, and of the Answer I had the honour to receive from you. And, in the inean time, I ought to reiterate to you the most positive assurauces of the disposition of the King my Master to maintain, and to strengthen the ties of friendship and good understanding with these States.

At the conclusion of your Note, which I am now answering, you are pleased to make known to me that this Government is anxious to terminate, by means of a frieudly Negotiation with the King my Master all pending differences, and that it will be very satisfactory to the President to know that I am vested with Powers to that effect. I have not lost any time in communicating to my Sovereign this desire of the President, and I will have the satisfaction of announcing to you what His Majesty may determine on this point; nevertheless, I ought to state to you, (although it would be highly flattering to me to treat with you, as your penetration and rectitude would facilitate the arrangement of these affairs,) yet it appears to me, that as Mr. Erving has not yet sailed from The United States, that the business would be expedited, if the President would give him Power and Instructions to terminate the Negotiations at Madrid. This arrangement cannot pre. sent great difficulties; the respective rights of each Power being once settled by common agreement, a friendly understanding being had on each point in discussion, and it being determined what are the reci. procal obligations of Spain and the United States, they would be still further obviated, if you would have the goodness to inform me, frankly and plainly, as I requested in a former Letter, what are the pretensions of right which The United States have against Spain, and what are those for their own convenience, which they desire to realize for an equivalent which may be advantageous to the 2 Nations, to the end that, with the knowledge I have acquired of the mutual interests of both, I may recommend to the attention of His Majesty these particular points.

I renew to you iny respects, &c. The Hon, James Monroe.

LUIS DE ONIS.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the prohibitions and provisions of the aforesaid Act shall be construed, and are hereby declared, to extend to Gonoaive and Tortuga, and to any other Dependency of the said Island of St. Domingo, not in pos. session of, or under the acknowledged Government of France.

[Approved, 24th February, 1807.]

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