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DEALERS IN NURSERY STOCK IN OHIO. The following list gives the names and addresses of dealers in nursery stock who have filed sworn statements as required by law, also the names of the nurseries from which the stock was obtained. William Bebb, Rockdale Ave., Cincinnati, O. Stock from M. W. Allen, Cincinnati, O. (nursery formerly

owned by S. W. Mooney, Madeira, O.)
D. W. Beckley, Richwood O.
Stock from George Hemm, Sidney, O.

John Siebenthaler, Dayton, O.
Reliance Nursery Co., Geneva, N. Y.

George S. Josselyn, Fredonia, N. Y.
The Zack Davis Co., Delaware, O.

Stock from The Storrs and Harrison Co., Painesville, O.
John Esselbach, Put-in-Bay, O.

Stock from T. S. Hubbard & Co., Fredonia, N. Y.
Gabriel Izer, R. R. 2, Farmersville, O.

Stočk from John Siebenthaler, Dayton, O.
Charles F. Hanna, 1333 Woodland Ave., Cleveland, O.

Stock from the Storrs and Harrison Co., Painesville, 0.
M. 0. Harmon, Prospect, 0.
Stock from McNary and Gaines, Xenia, O.

The Storrs and Harrison Co., Painesville, O.
Joseph Litzenberg, Findlay, O.

Stock from W. B. Cole, Painesville, O.
John Mickelsen, 42 Euclid View Ave., Glenville, 0.
Stock from W. B. Cole, Painesville, O.

Henry Kohankie, Painesville, O.
Joseph Ratterman, Sidney, O.
Stock from Augustine and Co., Normal, Ill.

George Hemm, Sidney, O.
Philip U. Rice, Wooster, O.
Stock from G. N. Mayer, Laketon, Ind.

The Storrs and Harrison Co., Painesville, 0.
David F. Shimp, Lyndon, O.
Stock from J. G. Ilarrison and Sons, Berlin, Md.

Leo Weltz's Sons, Wilmington, O.
T. B. Stone, Lorain, O.
Stock from The L. Green and Son Co., Perry, O.

T. S. IIubbard Co., Fredonia, N. Y.
The Storrs and Harrison Co., Painesville, O.

Eugene Willett, North Collins, N. Y.
George Oscar Wellman, Defiance, O.
Stock from Kalamazoo Nurseries, Kalamazoo, Mich.

First National Nurseries, Rochester, N. Y.

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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF LIVE STOCK

COMMISSIONERS OF OHIO.

To His Excellency, Myron T. Herrick, Governor of Ohio:

Sir:—The State Board of Live Stock Commissioners has the honor to submit herewith its third annual report, containing a general statement of its transactions from November 2, 1903 to and including November 7, 1904 together with an appendix containing the laws relating to live stock and to the board of live stock commissioners, rules and regulations adopted by the present board, and other matters of interest relating to the work of the Board.

Two changes in the membership of the Board occurred during the year, Messrs. L. P. Bailey and E. L. Lybarger succeeding Messrs. Jonas S. Stuckey and Benjamin P. Baldwin, whose terms expired in January, 1904.

The first regular meeting of the Board was held March 2, 1904. All members except Messrs. Cromley and Miller, whose absence was occasioned by sickness, were present.

The principal business transacted at this meeting was the consideration of a special report of the Veterinarian on the discovery of glanders in Brown and Adams counties.

After a thorough discussion of the report, the following was adopted:

It appearing to the Board that there is existing in Brown and Adams counties, state of Ohio, among the live stock of the state, a dangerous, contagious and infectious disease known as glanders; and it further appearing to said Board of Live Stock Commissioners that many horses in said counties are affected by such disease, at least fifteen in number, and whereas said animals so affected liave been examined by a competent veterinarian in the employ of this Board, to wit: Dr. Paul Fischer, the State Veterinarian, and his assistant, Dr. M. B. Lamb, who report said disease to be a dangerous and con

tagious malady, and it being the opinion of this State Board of Live Stock Commissioners that in order to prevent the further spread of such dangerous, contagious and infectious disease among the live stock of the state, it is necessary that such animals be killed.

It is, therefore, hereby ordered that such animals, after being duly appraised, as provided in section 4211-16 of the Revised Statutes of Ohio, be killed; and it is further ordered that Dr. Paul Fischer, the State Veterinarian, without unnecessary delay, kill, or cause to be killed, the following animals so found to be affected with glanders, and to cause their carcasses to be buried or burned:

One gray mare, owned by J. W. Trout, Feesburg, Brown county, Ohio.

One bay gelding, owned by J. C. Trout, Feesburg, Brown county, Ohio.

One bay mare, owned by Herman Seidel, Georgetown, Brown county, Ohio.

One sorrel mare, owned by Herman Seidel, Georgetown, Brown county, Ohio.

One gray colt, owned by Thomas Andrews, Georgetown, Brown county, Ohio.

One bay gelding, owned by Thomas Andrews, Georgetown, Brown county, Ohio.

One bay gelding owned by Al. Masterson, Georgetown, Brown county, Ohio.

One bay mare, owned by Andrew Fite, Blue, Creek, Adams county, Ohio.

One sorrel gelding owned by Andrew Fite, Blue Creek, Adams county, Ohio.

One gray gelding, owned by Jackson Cooper, Blue Creek, Adams county, Ohio.

One brown mare, owned by Frank Ross, Blue Creek, Adams county, Ohio.

One sorrel gelding, owned by Green N. Teachnor, Decatur, Brown county, Ohio.

One dun gelding, owned by Mrs. Sarah Parks, Blue Creek, Adams county, Ohio.

One gray gelding, owned by Louis Ogden, Blue Creek, Adams county, Ohio.

One gray mare, owned by Louis Ogden, Blue Creek, Adams county, Ohio.

Mr. Hinsdale submitted the following, which was adopted:

It being the opinion of the State Board of Live Stock Commissioners that glanders is a dangerous, contagious and infectious disease, and that any animal, or animals, affected by such disease are in

curable, and that when any animal, or animals, are so affected by such disease it is necessary, in order to prevent the spread of such dangerous, contagious or infectious disease among the live stock of the state, to destroy such animal, or animals; it is therefore ordered that whenever the State Veterinarian, in the employ of the Board of Live Stock Commissioners, upon examination shall find and so report that any animal, or animals, are affected by such dangerous and contagious malady, that said veterinarian shall kill, or cause to be killed, such animal, or animals, and their carcasses to be either burned or buried; and in the event that such animal, or animals, are destroyed, such animal, or animals, shall be appraised, as provided by section 4211-25, R. S.

It is further ordered that any animal, or animals, affected with glanders, and found to be so affected, by the State Veterinarian in the employ of this Board, shall be quarantined, and any member of such Board is hereby authorized to order such animals in quarantine and order the premises or farms where such disease exists to be quarantined.

Such quarantine may be under the supervision of the State Veterinarian, or a member of the Board, or other person duly authorized by said Board, or by a member thereof.

Ať subsequent meetings of the Board, brief reports of the Veterinarian were submitted for consideration and such action taken as the reports called for.

The diseases that have been investigated, and to which time has otherwise been devoted, are as follows:

Among Horses: Glanders, mange, coital exanthemà and dourine, rabies (hydrophobia), mould poisoning, strangles (distemper), influenza, malignant tumors, azoturia, etc.

Among Cattle: Tuberculosis, mange, rabies, Southern cattlc fever (Texas fever), actinomycosis (big jaw), infectious keratitis (sore eyes), anthrax, lice, Tinea (ring worm), digestive disorders, etc.

Among Sheep: Nodular disease (Oesophagostoma Columbiana) and scab.

Among Swine: Rabies, hog cholera and swine plague.
Among Dogs: Rabies.
Among Fowls : Cholera, roup and rabies.

Most of the time of the Veterinarian, and funds at the disposal of the Board, have been devoted to the control and eradication of glanders among horses. During the year twenty-eight horses and mules affected with glanders have been destroyed by order of the Board, the total for the past two years being sixty-one. These animals were appraised at five thousand and sixty-two dollars and fifty cents ($5,062.50).

In the state of Massachusetts, with only about one fifth as many horses as there are in Ohio, fifteen hundred and ninety-seven horses affected with glanders were destroyed by the Massachusetts Cattle Bureau, during a similar period (1902 and 1903).* A moderate estimate of the value of these animals is given at one hundred and twenty, to one hundred and thirty thousand dollars! Our actual losses, as far as figures at the disposal of the Board are concerned, are less than seven thousand dollars, for approximately the same period. This is a most gratifying condition and no effort should be spared to maintain it.

Glanders is constantly being imported from other states through the shipment of infected horses. Without proper control of the disease, which means the strict enforcement of wise sanitary measures, it would be only a question of time, and not a long time, when glanders would be just as prevalent in Ohio as in some other states, and even more so, because the states referred to are spending vast sums of money, annually, for its suppression. In Ohio we have every advantage in having comparatively healthy stock to begin with, but the opportunity to preserve this condition should not be neglected.

The appropriations at the disposal of the Board for carrying on the work assigned to it under the law, for the past three years, were, and are, insufficient. It is hoped that the next legislature will provide sufficient funds so that at least such work can be done as seems absolutely necessary to guard against the possible introduction of dangerous infectious diseases from other states. This refers not only to glanders in horses, and to mange, which has been the cause of some expense to the Board during the past year, and to such other diseases as already exist within our borders, but to exotic diseases as well. Every dollar appropriated for live stock sanitary work would be repaid the state a thousandfold in checking the ravages of disease, and in creating that feeling of security which attends a knowledge of protection against certain dreaded plagues. Although the farmer and the live stock owner are more directly affected by the condition of the health of our domestic animals than others, still every citizen of the state is interested in the improved quality of animal food products and their greater freedom from undesirable disease germs, which result from better sanitary conditions.

Fortunately, even under the present cramped financial condition, the general willing co-operation of live stock owners has enabled the Board to accomplish a great deal of good and effective work.

The enforcement, by the Board, of certain necessary regulations such, for example, as the destruction of a horse, or team of horses, which often represent the entire capital of a man, and his only means of providing bread for a family, is not a wholly pleasant duty, nor is it an easy matter to convince him that his horse, with no conspicuous symptom of disease, is a very dangerous animal. He cannot understand that such an animal may continue to live in apparently the same

*Second and Fourth Semi-annual Reports Massachusetts Cattle Bureau, 1903 and 1904.

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