The Gold Regions of South Eastern Africa

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E. Stanford, 1877 - 240 páginas
 

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Página iii - So geographers, in Afric maps, With savage pictures fill their gaps, And o'er unhabitable downs Place elephants for want of towns.
Página iv - Mombaza, and Quiloa, and Melind, And Sofala (thought Ophir), to the realm Of Congo, and Angola farthest south...
Página 13 - There," to use his own words, " the extent and beauty of the gold fields are such that I stood as it were transfixed, and for a few minutes was unable to use the hammer. . . . Thousands of persons might work on this extensive gold field without interfering with one another.
Página 122 - Hocks about the size of our bricks, and put together without mortar. The most remarkable of these walls is situated on the very edge of a precipitous cliff, and is in perfect preservation to a height of thirty feet ; the walls are about ten feet thick at the base and seven or eight at the top. In many places there remain beams of stone eight or ten feet in length projecting from the walls, in which they must be inserted to a depth of several feet, for they can scarcely be stirred.
Página xxi - Baines' geographical services by presenting him with a testimonial gold watch. He undertook, subsequently, other journeys into the adjoining Caffre countries, always mapping most carefully his routes and sketching scenery and people. After a visit to Port Elizabeth he planned a new journey, almost alone, to the gold district north of Tati, taking with him a small quartz-crushing machine, and had prepared all his outfit and waggons for the journey when he was struck down...
Página 50 - In making this grant I do not alienate from my Kingdom this or any other portion of it: but reserve intact the sovereignty of my Dominion, and Mr. Baines engaged on behalf of said Company not to make any claim contrary or injurious to my right as sovereign of the country, but to recognise my authority as King and to apply to me for such protection as he might require, and I engaged to grant such protection to Mr. Baines as should enable him to enjoy all lawful and proper use of the privileges granted...
Página 151 - The abdomen is marked with transverse stripes of yellow and dark chesnut fading toward the centre of the back, so as to give the idea of a yellow stripe along- it ; the belly livid white, the eyes are purplish brown, and the wings, of dusky glassy brown colour, slip one over the other, just as do the blades of a pair of scissors when closed — so that the Tsetse at rest on man or animal may infallibly be known by this one token.
Página 122 - ... In many places there remain beams of stone eight or ten feet in length projecting from the walls, in which they must be inserted to a depth of several feet, for they can scarcely be stirred. At the most they are eight inches broad by three inches in thickness, and consist of a very compact stone t with a metallic ring and greenish black colour.
Página 122 - They are extensive, and one collection covers a considerable portion of a gentle rise, while another, apparently a fort, stands upon a bold granite hill. The walls are still thirty feet in height, and are built of granite hewn into small blocks about the size of our bricks, and put together without mortar. The most remarkable of these walls is situated on the very edge of a precipitous cliff, and is in perfect preservation to the height of thirty feet.
Página 234 - Our Eastern Sisters, and their Missionary Helpers. By HARRIET WARNER ELLIS. Crown 8vo. 2s. 6d. cloth boards. Life in the Southern Isles ; or, Scenes and Incidents in the South Pacific and New Guinea. By the Rev. W. WYATT GILL, BA With Illustrations. Imperial 16mo.

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