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Dundee has always had one excellent Newspaper. It has now two; both Radical or Independent Reformers. The new Paper, The Dundee Chronicle, like its elder brother, The Advertiser, is conducted with great vigour and talent.

It gives us pleasure to announce another new Independent Paper, in a place, where, not many years ago, nothing but Toryism prevailed. It has been found, that Dumfriesshire cannot support its original Tory Journal; and has become even a little impatient of its excellent Whig Paper. We are immediately to have a thorough-going associate in The Dumfries Times, a new Paper, to be conducted by Mr Douglas of the London Spectator ; a man of ability, experience, and sound principles. This new Paper is to advocate the Ballot, short Parliaments, and an Extension of the Suffrage; in short, Radical Reform, in the best sense of the term. The Dumfries Times, under the care of so excellent an Editor, cannot fail to be one of the ablest and most honest Papers in Scotland. From what we know of the sentiments of the people of Dumfries-shire, this new Paper is certain of that extensive support which it will deserve.

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS.

Those provincial Editors whose copies of the Magazine are not received in proper time, are requested to take some opportunity of informing Messrs. Simpkin and Marshall of the channel through which they wish their copies forwarded. The Magazine is always in London before the last day of the month, and should be forwarded, in every instance, by the Magazine parcels which are dispatched on that day.

Communications for this Magazine may be addressed (post paid) to the Publisher, at Edinburgh; or to the care of Messrs. Simpkin and Marshall, Stationers' Hall Court, London, who send the Publisher a parcel, by mail, every Saturday afternoon.

Copies of New Books, and New Music, for review, should be forwarded early, to be sent by Messrs. Simpkin and Marshall's weekly parcel. Every work of merit sent, will be noticed in the Literary Register, or reviewed at length, if found of sufficient interest. In future, particular attention shall be paid to all Medical Books sent for review, and to Works relating to the Fine Arts.

Advertisements and Bills for the Magazine, require to be sent to Messrs. Simpkin and Marshall by the 15th of the month al latest; if possible, they should be sent by the 10th.

No better vehicle can be found than Tait's Magazine for any advertisement intended to be extensively made known in Scotland and the north of England. The Magazine goes to almost every Circulating Library, Reading-Room, and Book-Club throughout that part of Britain,--besides having a large private circulation in England and Ireland.

INTENTIONS OF MINISTERS_With feelings of exultation, we congratulate our readers on the rapid progress of the principle of Reform. By the elections, by the press, by the speeches at meetings of Reformers, and by every other indication, it has been made manifest that the spirit of Reform pervades the land. Of late, too, there are gratifying symptoms of the Administration having chosen the better course, and determined to proceed with the people, instead of stopping short in the good work, and coalescing with the people's enemies. These symptoms had not appeared when our leading article on “ Final Measures" went to press. If Ministers go with the People, they may calculate upon a support which will enable them to laugh to scoru all their opponents, in however high places they may sit.

POLITICAL TactICS.— To the proceedings of the New Parliament we look for. ward with intense interest. We hope the Reformed House will work well for the people. If not, after a fair trial, we must have an extension of the suffrage; in ad. dition to Short Parliaments and the Ballot.

Altered circumstances call for altered political tactics. Supposing, as we do, that the Ministry are to be on the side of the people, we think they should not be deterred from bringing forward, or supporting a popular measure, from fear of its not being carried at the first endeavour. Progress is made in the good cause, by every assault on corruption. As a consequence of this new mode of ministerial procedure, ministers should never think of resigning when left in a minority on a popular measure.

Our friends of the Political Unions we recommed to be watchful of the proceedings of Parliament; without interfering, excepting upon very important occasions, otherwise than by respectful petitions to the Legislature. Should the House of Commons be found not to represent the people, the Unions will have something to do. Or should the House of Commons and the Ministry be thwarted by the House of Hereditary Legislators, a piece of duty will fall to the lot of the Unions as plain as it is im. portant.

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS.

Communications for this Magazine may be addressed (post paid) to the Publisher, at Edinburgh ; or to the care of Messrs. Simpkin and Marshall, Stationers' Hall Court, London, who send the Publisher a parcel, by coach, every Saturday afternoon.

Copies of New Books, and New Music, for review, should be forwarded early, to be sent by Messrs. Simpkin and Marshall's weekly parcel. Every work of merit sent, will be noticed in the Literary Register, or reviewed at length, if found of sufficient interest. In future, particular attention shall be paid to all Medical Books sent for review, and to Works relating to the l'ine Arts.

Advertisements and Bills for the Magazine, require to be sent to Jessrs. Simpkin and Marshall by the 15th of the inonth at latest ; if possible, they should be sent by the 10th.

No better vehicle can be found than Tait's Magazine for any advertisement intended to be extensively made known in Scotland and the north of England. sides a large private circulation, the Magazine goes to almost every circulating library, reading room, and book club throughout that part of Britain. In total sale, Tait's Edinburgh Magazine ranks next to Blackwood and the New Monthly. But the Scottish sale of Tait's Magazine, the publisher bas reason to believe, is equal to that of either Blackwood or the Edinburgh Review.

Be.

The Letter of our esteemed Correspondent, JUNIUS REDIVIVUS, came too late for insertion in this Number. Several other articles, advertisements, and books for review, also were received too late ; the only steam vessel by which the Magazine could be conveyed to London having sailed so early as the 19th inst.

Communications which have been found not to suit us, or for which we had not space, have been returned, through Messrs. Simpkin and Marshall, London, and Mr. Cumming, Dublin.

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