Notes for a New Mind

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Universal-Publishers, 2005 - 112 páginas
What is known about the split brain is reviewed, in a historical context, as a paradigm for a new mind. The poetry of William Wordsworth is examined as a precursor to this mentality. The possibility of a new mind (and its new myth: the deconstruction) emerging from the split brain in the modern world is set forth. The last issue of consciousness, perhaps, is not the resolution of duality, but is the multiform periphery. The question is: am I more than my brain?

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Contenido

The Split Brain
2
The Fall
11
The Three Ages of Man
28
The New Mind
45
The Next Step
57
The Deconstruction
63
Laterals
71
The Superspatial Channel
77
The Watched Pot Never Boils
89
Endnotes
97
Derechos de autor

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 37 - Thou, whose exterior semblance doth belie Thy Soul's immensity ; Thou best Philosopher, who yet dost keep Thy heritage, thou Eye among the blind, That, deaf and silent, read'st the eternal deep, Haunted for ever by the eternal mind, — Mighty Prophet ! Seer blest ! On whom those truths do rest, Which we are toiling all our lives to find...
Página 35 - On every side In a thousand valleys far and wide, Fresh flowers; while the sun shines warm And the babe leaps up on his mother's arm: — I hear, I hear, with joy I hear! — But there's a tree, of many, one, A single field which I have look'd upon, Both of them speak of something that is gone: The pansy at my feet Doth the same tale repeat: Whither is fled the visionary gleam?
Página 39 - Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower ; We will grieve not, rather find Strength in what remains behind...
Página 35 - Heaven lies about us in our infancy. Shades of the prison-house begin to close Upon the growing boy; But he beholds the light and whence it flows, He sees it in his joy. The youth who daily farther from the East Must travel, still is Nature's priest, And, by the vision splendid, Is on his way attended. At length the man perceives it die away And fade into the light of common day.
Página 43 - Paradise, and groves Elysian, Fortunate Fields— like those of old Sought in the Atlantic Main— why should they be A history only of departed things, Or a mere fiction of what never was? For the discerning intellect of Man, When wedded to this goodly universe In love and holy passion, shall find these A simple produce of the common day.
Página 34 - Ye blessed Creatures, I have heard the call Ye to each other make; I see The heavens laugh with you in your jubilee; My heart is at your festival, My head hath its coronal, The fulness of your bliss, I feel — I feel it all.
Página 37 - Shaped by himself with newly-learned art; A wedding or a festival, A mourning or a funeral; And this hath now his heart, And unto this he frames his song: Then will he fit his tongue To dialogues of business, love, or strife; But it will not be long Ere this be thrown aside, And with new joy and pride The little Actor cons another part; Filling from time to time his "humorous stage...
Página 38 - But for those first affections, Those shadowy recollections, Which, be they what they may, Are yet the fountain light of all our day, Are yet a master light of all our seeing...
Página 38 - O joy ! that in our embers Is something that doth live, That nature yet remembers What was so fugitive...
Página 29 - Is lightened ; that serene and blessed mood In which the affections gently lead us on, Until the breath of this corporeal frame, And even the motion of our human blood Almost suspended, we are laid asleep In body, and become a living soul; While with an eye made quiet by the power Of harmony and the deep power of joy, We see into the life of things.

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