The Fate of Food: What We'll Eat in a Bigger, Hotter, Smarter World

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Harmony/Rodale, 4 jun. 2019 - 368 páginas

WINNER OF THE 2019 NAUTILUS BOOK AWARD 

In the fascinating story of the sustainable food revolution, an environmental journalist and professor asks the question: Is the future of food looking bleak—or better than ever?

 
“In The Fate of Food, Amanda Little takes us on a tour of the future. The journey is scary, exciting, and, ultimately, encouraging.”—Elizabeth Kolbert, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of The Sixth Extinction

Climate models show that global crop production will decline every decade for the rest of this century due to drought, heat, and flooding. Water supplies are in jeopardy. Meanwhile, the world’s population is expected to grow another 30 percent by midcentury. So how, really, will we feed nine billion people sustainably in the coming decades?

Amanda Little, a professor at Vanderbilt University and an award-winning journalist, spent three years traveling through a dozen countries and as many U.S. states in search of answers to this question. Her journey took her from an apple orchard in Wisconsin to a remote control organic farm in Shanghai, from Norwegian fish farms to famine-stricken regions of Ethiopia.
 
The race to reinvent the global food system is on, and the challenge is twofold: We must solve the existing problems of industrial agriculture while also preparing for the pressures ahead. Through her interviews and adventures with farmers, scientists, activists, and engineers, Little tells the fascinating story of human innovation and explores new and old approaches to food production while charting the growth of a movement that could redefine sustainable food on a grand scale. She meets small permaculture farmers and “Big Food” executives, botanists studying ancient superfoods and Kenyan farmers growing the country's first GMO corn. She travels to places that might seem irrelevant to the future of food yet surprisingly play a critical role—a California sewage plant, a U.S. Army research lab, even the inside of a monsoon cloud above Mumbai. Little asks tough questions: Can GMOs actually be good for the environment—and for us? Are we facing the end of animal meat? What will it take to eliminate harmful chemicals from farming? How can a clean, climate-resilient food supply become accessible to all?

Throughout her journey, Little finds and shares a deeper understanding of the threats of climate change and encounters a sense of awe and optimism about the lessons of our past and the scope of human ingenuity.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - AliceaP - LibraryThing

I've read quite a few books that focus on climate change and how we as a global community will have to adjust to live in the new world. The Fate of Food deals exclusively with food science by looking ... Leer reseña completa

LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - 2wonderY - LibraryThing

Though I've read extensively on this topic, the readability lagged (or perhaps the times made it seem so.) Still looking for an answer to a fundamental question about GMO Bt maize and other species ... Leer reseña completa

Índice

INTRODUCTION
1
Ch Apter 1 A Taste of Things to Come
11
Killing Fields 3ſ CHAPTER 3 Seeds of Drought 5 7
57
RoboCrop SS CHAPTER 5 Sensor Sensibility
110
CHA pter 6 Altitude Adjustment
129
Tipping the Scales
149
CHA PTE tº 8 Meat Hooked CHAPTER 9 Stop the Rot CHAPTER 10 Pipe Dreams
212
Desperate Measures CHAPTER 12 Antiquity Now CHAPTER 13 What Rough Feast
260
EPILOGUE Growing
279
Notes
289
Acknowledgments
321
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Sobre el autor (2019)

Amanda Little is a professor of journalism and Writer-in-Residence at Vanderbilt University. Her reporting on energy, technology, and the environment has taken her to ultra-deep oil rigs, down manholes, and inside monsoon clouds. Little's work has appeared in publications ranging from The New York Times and The Washington Post to Wired, Rolling Stone, and Bloomberg Businessweek. She writes, bikes, and is learning to cook and tango in Nashville, Tennessee, where she lives with her husband and kids.

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