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is well detailed in the Chatham letters, by an eye- treme penalty of the law when there were no ag. witness, the Whig Earl of Shelburne: 'Mr. Wed- grieved parties in the case. For it cannot be prederburn (appointed solicitor-general 1771) under tended that the accomplices, who were the only the pretext of reply and the encouragement of the witnesses of importance, were such. Permit me to judges-the indecency of whose behavior exceeded, add that there seems some misapprehension reit is agreed on all hands, that of any committee of specting section 11 of the Criminal Law Amendelection-entered largely into the constitution and ment Act. It was introduced in order, its promoter temper of the province, and concluded by a most said, to bring the English law on the subject into harscurrillous invective against Dr. Franklin, occa- mouy with the French law; but, in point of fact, it sioned, as Dr. Franklin says, by some matter of does nothing of the kind. The maximum penalty, private animosity; as Mr. Wedderburn says, by his as first proposed, was one year's imprisonment, but attachment to his deceased friend, Mr. Whately,

when another year was suggested it was allowed tu the publication of whose correspondence contribu-pass without discussion. The clause, in fact, was teil to influence the assembly to their late resolu-rushed' through the House at the time of the tion.' The piece of eristic in question was: “Amidst ! 'panic'caused by Mr. Stead's sensational articles. tranquil events, here is a man who, with the ut

But surely common sense and common fairness demost insensibility to remorse, stands up and avows

mand that a distinction should be made between himself the author of all. I can compare him only cases where the chief witnesses have a grievance, to Zanga, in Dr. Young's 'Revenge'

and where they are only self-declared accomplices,

who make a trade of vice."
Know, then, 'twas I.
I forged the letter - I disposed the picture;

The second is:
I hated-I despis'd-and I destroy.

"All things are possible with God - and a com“I ask, my lords, whether the revengeful temper mon jury, and everyone must have been prepared attributed to the bloody African is not surpassed by for the possibility of the Wilde trial ending as it the coolness and apathy of the wily American?' did, although the result owed little to the assistDr. Priestly, another eye-witness of this historic ance of counsel for the defense. In fact the proscene, said that at the sallies of Mr. Weddorceedings reflect little credit on any of the persons burn's sarcastic wit all the members of the council, concerned except the judge. The prosecution was the president himself not excepted, frequently singularly weak, and against all precedent in a case laughed outright, no one behaving with decency of such importance, had no assistance from either except Lord North.'

of the law officers. Besides the inconvenience and “ This incident may fairly be claimed as a locus | unfairness to the prisoners of including charges of classicus for the solicitor-general not 'behaving as a conspiracy (which, as his lordship intimated, judge,' and its lamentable consequences furnish no should not have been brought at all) with those unmean support to Sir E. Clarke's contention tliat he der section 11 of the Criminal Law Amendment should do so. But, as one who has frequently en

Act; everyone with any experience in criminal matjoyed Sir F. Lockwood's 'sallies,' I must of course

ters knows the fatal effect likely to follow the protest that I am unwilling and incapable of pass- abandonment of serious charges at the last moment. ing any opinion as to whether he may not, like De

If, the ordinary juryman argues, these are abandmosthenes in Ad Leptinem, indulge in rhetorical oned, can we be quite sure that the others should bitterness."

have been preferred? He might also regard it in Two short letters follow. The first is:

the nature of a jetsam-as evidence that the prose“In case your columns are open to remarks on cution felt themselves in a bad way. Another fatal the recent trial, I beg to submit that there are co- blunder was the failure to seize the obvious reply to gent reasons why the result must be regarded as un- Sir Edward Clarke's natural and obvious criticisms satisfactory. To begin with, the case had been upon three of the witnesses. With corroboration, prejudged in an unusual manner, so much so, that and the absence of any inducement to lie, their very it is surprising that it was not removed by a writ of infamy becomes a claim to confidence. Would any certiorari to the Court of Queen's Bench. The but the basest of mankind be guilty of such stress laid by the prosecution one the grave nature crimes? It would also bave been well to point of the charges surely demanded that the tainted out in reply to Mr. Oscar Wilde's rhetorical witnesses should be corroborated by evidence of a deliverance from the witness-box that Plato's conclusive kind; and at the outset a man is placed philosophy, although peculiar (witness the conunder peculiar disadvantages when the offenses are versation in the garden where the cicadas alleged to have been committed months, and even chirped), never recommended anything like the years ago. In considering the sentence, it is aston- gift of silver cigarette-cases to the vendors of ishing that the judge should have inflicted the ex- newspapers."

The Lur Journal says, editorially:

informed as to the facts by the taking of testimony “ The ludicrous suggestion which has been made and the summing up of such testimony by skilled in certain quarters that Sir Edward Clarke will suf- legislative counsel, so that the recommendations of fer politically by his brilliant and strenuous ad vo- committees may partake of the nature, as to each cacy in the Wilde case might well be passed over particular bill, of a special inquiry and a special in silence were it not that the duty of counsel in committee of investigation. defending prisoners is a subject on which very

This would reduce the number of bills which are many people entertain hazy ideas. It is not neces- brought before the consideration of the House, sary to dwell on the supreme ability and courage and would end almost altogether the legislation, withi which Sir Edward fought this difficult and both corrupt and slipsbod, which is the result of losing battle; everyone admits that fact, and indeed ignorance, by reason of which venality can protect it forms the ground for the absurd rumor to which itself on the pretense of being ignorant of the conwe bave referred. We shall merely remark in passa quences of its own acts. ing, that the English bar has every right to be, and

The one single element which was accepted by is to a man, proud of the brilliant intellectual power the Constitutional Convention out of the whole displayed in this case by one who is amongst the

scheme of constitutional reform put before it hy most distinguished of Nisi Prius advocates. If

me to bring method and order into our legislation Lord Brougbam had not made his unfortunately and give notice to the locality of its proposed enactexaggerated statement in Queen Caroline's case as

ment, was that of submitting to the mayors of the to the revolution and anarchy which counsel were

cities local laws which affected the cities, and it is entitled to bring about in the interests of their admitted that much good has already been accomclients, no section of the public probably would plished and will hereafter result from the adoption have taken alarm at any strenuousness on the part by the people of this State of this tentative and limof counsel. It may be desirable to recall the fact ited reform in the enactment of local measures. that Lord Brougham went far beyond the limits of

However, a much larger scheme of notice to loaccuracy in this passage, and that the true theory calities which are to be affected by legislation, and was defined by Sir Alexander Cockburn in his fa- information of the members of the Legislature, is mous speech at the reception of M. Berryer. The possible by enacting into law in the State of New advocate may use the weapons of the soldier, but York a modified form of the Standing Orders which not the dagger of the assassin. But the most since 1844 have regulated the law-making of the strenuous defense is the right, even of the worst parliament of England, and which were adapted by criminals, and is in accordance with the best inter- me to the needs of the State of New York in a ests of society as a whole.”

series of sections of a proposed article in the State

Constitution, but which may be formulated into a SLIPSHOD LEGISLATION.

statute instead.

It is, therefore, my opinion that no one law which TAE question you put to me is, as I understand it,

can be enacted by the Legislature of the State of What legislation is it of primary importance

New York is as important as that which will bring for the Legislature of the State of New York to enact ? My answer is: Some statute which will method, order and light in place of chaos, venality

and ignorance in the enactment of the laws themdeal with the method of enacting laws, the notice

selves.

SIMON STERNE. to be given to parties and localities interested and

- The World. the proper separation of public from private legislation.

A controversy arising from overlapping locations, A great opportunity was lost by the Constitu- after being carried on both before the land office and tional Convention when it failed to see, not with the courts, was compromised by allowing one of standing the persistency with which the Board of the locations to patent most of the disputed land. Trade and myself pointed out to it the source of the A company was then organized, representing both evil, that some constitutional amendment should be parties to the dispute, and the land was conveyed adopted which would separate public from private to it. Held, that this company could not refer its bills, create a cabinet of State officers for the pro- title to either or both of the contending locations, motion of the one-public measures--and subject at its election, so as to give it the right to follow private and local bills to trial, scrutiny and exami- the dip within the end lines of their location at nation, with the aid of experts, and compel such will, but on the contrary, it must derive its rights bills to bear the necessary expense of such scrutiny in this respeøt solely from the location under which and observation, so that the Legislature may be in the patent was obtained. (Del Monte Mining & formed, not by mere statements of orators or lob. Milling Co. v. New York and L. C. Mining Co. byists, but as carefully and thoroughly as a jury is '[U. S. C. C. (Colo.), 66 Fed. Rep. 212.)

TAI

POST-OFFICE

EMBEZZLING

Abstracts of Recent Decisions. he

may do either when brought before the examin

ing magistrate, or when called upon to plead to the APPEAL---RES JUDICATA.-- When a causc has been

information in the District Court. (Coffield v. State reversed and remanded, with directions to enter a

[Neb.], 62 N. W. Rep. 875.) certain decree, and thereupon such a decree is en- EMINENT DOMAIN-RAILROAD COMPANIES. - It is tered by the trial court, such decree cannot be well settled that after a railroad company, having questioned on a further appeal, provided it con- the power of eminent domain, has entered into actforms to the direction. (Roby v. Calumet & C. ual possession of land necessary for its corporate Canal & Dock Co. [I.], 40 N. E. Rep. 293.) purposes, whether with or without the consent of BILL OF LADING-PLEDGE. - E. & Co. were grain

the owner, a subsequent vendee of the latter takes

the land subject to the burden of the railroad, and brokers in the city of A. Persons from whom they the right to payment from the railroad company, if bought grain drew at sight on E. & Co. for the price, it entered under an agreement to pay, or to damand forwarded the drafts for collection, with the bills of lading of the grain attached. E. & Co. ar

ages if it entered without authority, belongs to the ranged with the C. bank to take up these drafts,

owner at the time possession was taken. (Roberts

v. Northern Pac. R. Co. [U. S. S. C.], 15 S. C. Rep. and hold them as demand notes against E. & Co.,

756.) with the bills of lading as security. E. & Co. claimed no control or right to the bills of lading

FEDERAL OFFENSE until they should take them up from the C. bank. LETTERS.--- The statute making it a crime to take a Held, that though the payment of the drafts by the letter from the post-otlice, or which has been in any C. bank extinguished them as commercial paper, post-office, " or in the custody of any letter or mail the bills of lading did not thereby become the carrier before it has been delivered to the person to property of E.

Co., but the bank became the law- whom it is directed (Rev. St., $ 3892), does not exful holder thereof, and entitled to receive from the tend to the case of a letter stolen from the desk of carrier of the goods represented by such bills of the addressee, upon which it has been placed by lading—at least to the extent of the amounts paid the mail carrier, in the absence of any one to reon the drafts, with interest. (Walters v. Western ceive it. (United States v. Safford [U. s. D. C., & A. R. Co. [U. S. C. C. of App.), 66 Fed. Rep. 862.) Mo.], 66 Fed. Rep. 942.) CORPORATION- LIABILITY OF STOCKHOLDER.-One

INSURANCE WAIVING CONDITION.-Notice and who subscribes for stock in a corporation, but only proof of loss are waived when an insurance comdelivers the subscription to the soliciting agent to pany denies liability on the ground that its policy hold until he has investigated the matter, and who was not in force when the loss occurred. (German immediately investigates and promptly forbids the Ins. & Sav. Inst. v. Kline (Neb.], 62 N. W. Rep. delivery of the subscription, is not liable thereon. 857.) (Great Western Tel. Co. v. Lowenthal [111. ], 40 N. E. Rep. 318.)

LIFE INSURANCE POLICY-CONSTRUCTION.- A life

insurance policy insuring the life of a father was isCONSTITUTIONAL

sued upon an application signed by both the father HIBITION OF SALE.--Act Va. March 1, 1892, entitled and the son, in which the latter was named as bene“An act to prevent the adulteration of butter and ficiary. The policy was made payable to the cheese, and the sale of the same, and preserve the sured” after due notice of the death of the “ person public health," but in fact and substance prohibit- whose life is hereby insured.” Held, to be a coning the sale of oleomargarine, is not a health law, tract made with the son in his own name and for but an interference with interstate commerce, and his own benefit. Cyrenius v. Mutual Life Ins. Co. for that reason unconstitutional. (Ex parte Scott of New York (N. Y.], 40 N. E. Rep. 225.) [U. S. C. C. Va.] 66 Fed. Rep. 45.)

MASTER AND SERVANT- ASSUMPTION OF RISK.LEGISLATIVE APPORTIONMENT. - Whether a

Plaintiff, while stationed as a lookout near the legislative apportionment is constitutional is a ques- front end of cars which were being pushed along a tion within the jurisdiction of the courts, though spur track, was thrown forward by a collision with it involves only political rights. (People v. Thomp- a car standing on the track, and injured.

Brush son (111.), 40 N. E. Rep. 307.)

overhung the track and obscured the view. Helil, CRIMINAL LAW—WAIVING PRELIMINARY

that it was a question for the jury whether or not NATION.–A defendant, unless a fugitive from jus plaintiff assumed the risk attendant 0.2 such conditice, is entitled to a preliminary examination before tion of the track. (Oregon Short Line & U. N. Ry. he can be placed upon trial in a prosecution by in- Co. v. Tracy (U. S. C. C. of App.)

, 6.6 Fed. Rep. formation, unless be waives such examination, which | 931.)

LAW

OLEOMARGARINE

PRO

as

EXAMI

OF

FILING

TRAN

1

MASTER AND SERVANT - ASSUMPTION OF RISKS. which it desires to do business, does not take it out Where plaintiff went into defendant's employ as of the power of a railroad company previously owncar inspector, after stating that he would not unless ing property, and authorized to do business in the furnished with a proper signal to protect him wbile State, to make a valid sale of all such property, under the cars, on the promise that the signal without first complying with the provisions of the should be furnished, but before it arrived he was statute. (Chattanooga, R. & C. R. Co. v: Evans injured by the backing of a train against a car [U. S. C. C. of App.), 66 Fed. Rep. 809. which he was working, defendait is not liable,

REMOVAL of CAUSES - TIME plaintiff having assumed the risk. (Marean v. New

SCRIPT.-While, upon removal of a cause from a York, S. & W. R. Co. [Penn.), 31 Atl. Rep. 562.)

State to a Federal Court, security is required that MECHANIC'S LIEN FORECLOSURES. - In an action the transcript shall be filed on the first day of the by a sub-contractor to foreclose a mechanic's lien next succeeding term, the Federal Court is not to based on the claim that the contractor has been be deprived of jurisdiction if the transcript is filed fully paid in advance of the terms of his contract, at a later day in the term, but, for good cause, may the owner, though admitting that he has overpaid permit it to be filed at such later day. (Lucker v. the contractor, and accepted the work unfinished, Phænix Assur. Co. of London (U. S. C. C., S. Car. ], may make the contractor a party to the suit, and 66 Fed. Rep. 161.) have his claims against such owner determined

TAXATION-EXEMPTIONS--CORPORATION.-A fortherein. (Hinton Bridge Const. Co. v. New York

eign manufacturing corporation authorized by its Cent. & H. R. R. Co. [N. Y.), 40 N. E. Rep. 86.)

charter to manufacture, buy and sell, or otherwise NEGOTIABLE INSTRUMENTS-CONSTRUCTIVE KNOWL- procure, electric apparatus of all kinds, and enLEDGE. – Knowledge of such facts as would put a gaged in the manufacture of such apparatiis, and prudent man on inquiry in reference to negotiable also in buying and selling the same, in New York paper is, in the absence of bad faith, not sufficient State, is not wholly engaged in carrying on manuknowledge to affect the rights of a purchaser for facture, and hence it is taxable on the amount of value and before maturity. (Clark v. Evans (U. S. its capital employed in the State. (People v. C. C. of App.), 66 Fed. Rep. 263.)

Campbell (N. Y.), 40 N. E. Rep. 239.)
INDORSEMENTS.-Where a negotiable prom-

TRUSTS

ENFORCEMENT.-A stakeissory note has been before maturity indorsed to a

holder or custodian of a fund, who makes a conthird person, the maker of the note must, in order

tract with a claimant to the fund for a payment to to avail himself of the defense of payment before him of a portion thereof, in consideration of rethe indorsement, plead and prove that the plaintiff taining the balance for himself, cannot in a suit on had notice of such payment before the indorsement. the contract, and in the absence of express provi(Yenney v. Central City Bank [Neb).], 62 N. W. sions therein, require the complainant to bring in Rep. 872.]

other claimants to fund, or require an adjudication PROMISSORY NOTE. -An agreement by the upon the rights of these claimants or other possible payee of a note, with the maker's widow, that cer- claimants to the fund, as precedent to a right of tain sums paid by the maker, and by her after his recovery under the contract. (Ludlow v. Strong death, for the payee's benefit, together with the sum (N. J.], 31 Atl. Rep. 409.) paid by her to the payee, should be accepted in full

FOLLOWING TRUST FUNDS. - Where goods settlement of the note, constitutes a valid satisfac

sold on credit to an insolvent firm, through its tion thereof. (Beck v. Snyder [Penn.), 31 Alt. Rep. fraud, were subsequently resold to its customers, 555.)

and the firm's vendor afterward discovered the PARTNERSHIP

It is within the fraud and rescinded the sale, equity has jurisdicpower of one member of a partnership, acting in tion to follow the proceeds of the resales into the good faith, to make a valid chattel mortgage of all hands of the firm's assignee for the benefit of credthe partnership property to insure partnership incitors, and subject them to a lien in favor of the dedebtedness. (Settle v. Hargadine-McKittrick Dry frauded vendor. (American Sugar Refining Co. v. Goods Co. (U. S. C. C. of Apr.], 66 Fed. Rep. 850.) Fancher (N. Y.], 40 N. E. Rep. 206.)

RAILROAD COMPANIES-- FOREIGN CORPORATIONS. Wills--JURISDICTION OF FEDERAL COURTS.-A --A State statute, declaring it unlawful for any for- will having been established by competent authoreign corporation to own or acquire property in the ity, the Federal courts have jurisdiction to deterState, or do any business there, without first filing mine its interpretation in an action between citia copy of its charter in the office of the secretary zens of different States. (Wood v. Paine [U. S. C. of State, and an abstract thereof in each county in C., R. I.], 66 Fed. Rep. 807.)

CONTRACT

- MORTGAGE.

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GENERAL INDEX.

391

PAGE.
"A REASONABLE ROUBT” AND “IN-
TENT TO DEFRAUD"

77
ABBOTT AUSTIN, Should the Code of Civil
Procedure be revised, condensed and simplified ?

29
ADDRESS. AT THE COMMENCEMENT
EXERCISES OF THE BUFFALO LAW
SCHOOL, by Geo. B. Wellington.

361
AMOUNT RECOVERABLE FOR DEATH
OF A PERSON, no Limitation. Decision of General
Term Common Pleas.

382
AN IRISH LORD CHIEF JUSTICE ON AN
IRISH CHIEF BARON..

14
ANTI-TOXIC SERUM, a Subject-Matter for a
Patent.

13
BANK TAX CASES, the minority opinion of the
Kentucky Court of Appeals in the

393
BANNISTER, H. M., on Hypnotic influence in
criminal cases

87
BECKER, TRACY C., address at the annual

meeting of the New York State Bar Association... 69
BENHAM, GEORGE A., on the revision of the
Code

109
BLACKBURN LORD...

88
BOOK REVIEWS:

American Railroad and Corporation Reports (Lewis). 384
American State Reports, Vol. 39.

1922
American State Reports, Vol. 40

208
Andrews' Stephen's Pleadings.

192
A Manual of Public International Law (Walker). 384
a System of Legal Medicine (Hamilton).

192
Bender's Lawyers' Diary and Directory.

31
Birdseye's Chronological Table of New York Stat-
utes, Supplement to January, 1895

31
Bishop on Insolvent Debtors

208
Black's Constitutional Law

208
Code Amendments of 1895, New York State

400
Commentaries on the law of Private Corporations
(Thompson).

80
Commentaries on the law of corporations (Thompson) 383
Courts and their jurisdiction...
Fetter on Equity - Hornbook series,

208
Gardner's Review in Law and Equity..

192
Income tax of 1894, by John A. Glenn..

80
The Income Tax Law of 1894 by Foster & Abbott 176
New York Digest, Reports and Statutes...

208
The Rules of the Court of Appeals of the State of New
York

31
BRITISH TRANSPORT OF FRENCH

WAR MATERIAL TO MADAGASCAR ·
BRITISH SUITORS IN FRENCH COURTS
CARRINGTON, CARRY - master and servant... 365
CERTIORARI - proposed revision of the Code of
Civil Procedure relative to, by J. Newton Fiero.

23
CODE OF CIVIL PROCEDURE - Its revision,
by George A. Benham

109
CODE OF CIVIL PROCEDURE method of
revision, by George A. Benham.

155
CODE OF CIVIL PROCEDURE proposed re-
vision relative to mandamus, certiorari and prohibi-
tion, by J. Newton Fiero..

23
CODE OF CIVIL PROCEDURE - proposed re-

vision of part of title II, chapter XVI, by J. Wewton
Fiero

234
CODE OF CIVIL PROCEDURE revision..... 217
CODE OF CIVIL PROCEDURE - Should it be

revised, condensed and simplified, by Austin Abbott.. 29
CODE REVISION. METHOD OF, by George A.
Benham

155
COMMENTS OF ENGLISH LEGAL PERI-
ODICALS ON THE WILDE CASE

411
CONDITIONS PRECEDENT OR SUBSE-
QUENT. by F.M. Evarts..

343
CONTINUANCE OF THE MISCELLAN
EOUS REPORTS OF THE OFFICIAL
SERIES. by J. Newton Fiero.

139
CONTRACTS, THE LAW OF. by Ernest A .Jell. 140
CONVICT MADE GOODS IN OHIO

142
CORRESPONDENCE-The Income Tax, by Leo G.
Rosenblatt...

112
COUDERT F. R., “Our greatest lawyer"

318
COVENANTS IN A LEASE FOR YEARS, by
James M. Kerr.....

6

PAGE
COX, ROLAND, On the Constitution of the United

States and its relation to the subject of trade-
marks

118
CURRENT TOPICS:
Adviser, Governor Morton's legal .

1
Annuity society in Eng und, decision as to ...

257
Attorney-General, application to, to bring action
against officers of the Coffee Exchange..

216
Bacon, Sir James, death of, in England.

392
Bar Association, Programme of.

1
Bar Association, Papers to be read at

4
Bar Association, Meeting of...
Bar Association, Des Moines..

131
Barnett, Judge, designation to hold Special Terms.. 18
Barnett, Judge Joseph S., designation to hold Special
Terms

86
Buchanan case, comments on

134
Buchanan, time fixed for execution by Court of Ap-
peals :

327
Cantoni case, in Court of Appeals..
Capital and labor.

66
Case of Argus Co. v. John Palmer, et al.

401
Choate, Joseph A., arguments on income tax 195
Choate, Joseph H., arguments on income tax

210
Choate, Joseph H., argument on income tax case. 358
Circumstantial evidence in the Joniaux trial.
Code of Civil Procedure, amendments to section on
divorces

135
Code of Procedure, revision of ...

209
Code, revision of

97
Code revision, method of

150
Code, proposed revision of.

17
Concurrent resolution to allow women to vote in
New York

310
Congress, course of a bill through..

51
Constitution, changes in, effect on legislation. 305
Constitutional provisions as to passes.

69
Constitutional convention, review of

403
Copyright, infringment, English principles as to.... 391
Corporations, U.S. Courts will not adopt decisions
of State Courts as to right of

358
Corporation, winding up business, English decision. 374
Court-martial, U. S. Supreme Court decision as to
right of trial

325
Courts, reform on in California

214
Creditors of corporation, must take notice of

powers
and limitations of latter

277
Dillon, Judge John F., address before State Bar As-
sociation.

34
Dillon, Judge John F., comments on paper, Prop-
erty; its Rights and Duties in Our Social and
Legal Systems

129
Divorce, extension of law as to...

324
Dodge Inheritance Tax Law of Obio.

263
Execution, levy on property temporarily in another
State

355
Gaynor, Judge William J., on arbitration..

99
Gerry, Elbridge T., Whipping bill

164
Habeas Corpus, comment on revision of Code as to, 230
Habeas Corpus, in Kentucky.

101
Harlan, Mr. Justice, dissenting opinion in Income
Tax...

273
Hillmon case in Kansas,

196
Holdoin, Judge Jesse, address of on “Should the
Costs of Litigation be Increased?"

244
Hornblower, William B., paper of on Has the Law

Become Commercialized?".
How to explain to your client why you lost his case.. 145
Hyams trial in Canada....

310
Hypnotism as a defense

241
Ice, harvesting of, property in.

85
Income Tax, amendment to.

115
Income Tax, arguments before U. S. Supreme Court, 161
Income Tax decision, article by Judge R. M. Benja-
min

404
Income Tax, comments on.

130
Income Tax, comments on

209
Income Tax, comments on, article by Carmen F.
Randolph.

65
Income Tax, comment on arguments

179
Income Tax, comments on decisions of Supreme

Court.

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