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me we did not come 1,400 miles merely to listen to the Governor of Colorado and the ex-Secretary of the Interior defend their reputations !

SENATOR SHAFROTH-All right; we will quit.

CHAIRMAN FISHER—Gentlemen, the hour has much more than arrived—

MR. CHARLEs N. CHADwick, of New York—Mr. Chairman' (Cries of “Vote! Vote! Vote!”)

CHAIRMAN FISHER—Does the house desire to listen to further debate on this question?

(Cries of “No! No! No!”)

MR. CHADwick—Mr. Chairman' I think it would be wise for the house to listen to a few words on this question.

(Cries of “Vote! Vote! Vote!”)

A great deal of time has been taken up in personal controversy far away from the merits of the questions that have been presented to us. I want to make just this one point, that in place of emphasis upon water power development, you should consider and not lose sight of the potable use of water, which is the primary use; and inasmuch as you cannot take from the same sources water for both power and for potable use, you need to regard that fact. I have been taking water out of 900 square miles in the Catskills, as commissioner, and I know whereof I speak. I know the problems involved in the invasion of district rights, and while I believe the water should be utilized, at the same time it should be done with caution and we should have due regard for the potable use of water.

New York State has preserved its Adirondacks to the future generations, that will use water, by reason of the constitutional amendment of 1894, which prevented the use of the forests in any particular whatsoever. That has been amended now, and three per cent is to be allowed for that use. I simply speak of these things we should remember in placing emphasis upon power development and upon forestry, because it is a question of taking into consideration the primary use of water, which comes from the rainfall, and is for the comfort and convenience and use of the people, whom we must consider. The water supply can be exhausted and lowered by building storage reservoirs and by sinking wells, and the result is if you are not careful when you turn the faucet in the morning for water, it does not run and your necessity for conservation congresses disappears. I believe most emphatically and thoroughly in the attitude and the judgment of this committee in that report upon which it has agreed as a wise step in the direction of the utilization of water power, but at the same time there should be said in this convention and at this time a word in the interest of the potable use of water for all the communities of this great country. (Applause.) MR. Lewis B. Stillwell—Mr. Chairman, there is a difference of opinion in this convention, is there not? (Laughter.) After listening to this debate I am satisfied that any positive action taken here will carry no more weight than simply the debates as they stand. There has been a good deal of personal feeling here, and I believe we can avoid a clash which may mean the division of this great Congress, by simply a change of one word in the motion before the house. I move you, sir, as an amendment, that the word “adopted” be stricken out, and the word “filed” be inserted in lieu thereof. I hope some state will call for a vote by states on this motion.

CHAIRMAN FISHER—The debate has been almost entirely in regard to matters outside the unanimous report and I find myself judging of the situation much as Mr. Stillwell, who is on the committee and is a water power engineer, has expressed, himself to you, namely, that if we are all agreed upon this particular report as a step in the right direction, there may be no division necessary. If the motion is confined to that report

MR. M. T. BRYAN, of Tennessee—Mr. Chairman I rise, Mr. Chairman, to offer a suggestion and to make a motion. It is very difficult to understand the exact issue before the Convention. The gentlemen who have spoken to us have spoken of everything else except possibly what is in the report.

In view of the misunderstanding and in view of the fact that there is a difference of opinion, it does seem to me that the sensible and proper thing to do, in order that this Convention may be fully advised, is to refer that report to the committee as originally contemplated.

(Cries of “No 1 No! No!”)

Wait a minute, gentlemen. It is absolutely necessary, for a proper and intelligent understanding of things, for every proposition to be passed upon by people who are charged with the duty of examining it and reporting upon it. For instance, upon the reports submitted, I have read them over carefully and I would take the majority report, because it is the majority report of a very intelligent and hard-working committee that gave their time and attention to it. I believe that they know, better than I, who have only made a casual examination of it.

Some slur was cast upon that committee. I had no hand in the appointment of the committee. I am not on the Committee on Resolutions and I know nothing about that. We cannot afford to take an unsupported statement. The gentleman may have the right from his standpoint, but I take it that this large, intelligent, agreeable representative convention of the people of all the country have an honorable and highminded Committee on Resolutions, and we can trust to their action rather than to partisan statements made upon the floor of the Convention. Mr. Chairman, I rise simply to make the motion that this report, with the other reports, be referred to the Committee on Resolutions, to report tomorrow or next day, as may seem opportune. MRs. LIVINGSTON Rowe SchUYLER, of New York—Mr. Chairman, there is only one person capable of passing upon any resolution, and that is the body itself. The committee may report it, but the body must adopt it. (Applause.) CHAIRMAN FISHER—Gentlemen, we have a rather unusual parliamentary situation. MR. E. B. StAHLMAN, of Tennessee—Mr. Chairman, I am going to support the motion of my friend Bryan from Tennessee and I will give my reasons for it. The very able committee that prepared and signed this unanimous report represents five states in this Union. There are forty-eight states represented in this convention. The states represented upon that committee consist of Pennsylvania, New York, Georgia, Massachusetts and New Jersey. I say that a work of this character should be something that we desire to have made effective, something that will represent the best thought and interests of this country, and ought not to be disposed of by a committee representing five or six states in a convention represented by forty-eight states. This organization has created the Committee on Resolutions. The original purpose was that all matters, resolutions and reports, without debate, should be submitted to that committee. It is a disrespect to the committee and a disrespect to the states having members on that committee, to refuse to give that committee the proper recognition, to allow that committee to pass upon these various questions. I have listened all day to the various questions that have been presented in connection with this report, and it has been more of a personal offense and defense of past administrations and past officials than it has been an effort to represent the true interests of this country on one of the greatest problems of the day. I insist upon Mr. Bryan's motion, and I say if we want to do something, if we want to accomplish something, it is due to us, as representatives of a great republic of forty-eight states, to vote upon it decently and intelligently and orderly.

(Mr. Bryan's motion that the unanimous recommendation of the Committee on Water Power, with the other reports, be referred to the Committee on Resolutions was declared lost on a vote taken viva voce. There was a call for a division by

states. Chairman Fisher read article 9 of the constitution as

follows: Section 1. Each member of the Congress shall be entitled to one vote on all actions taken viva voce. Section 2. A division or call of states may be demanded on any action, by a state delegation. On division, each delegate shall be entitled to one vote; provided (1) that no state shall have more than twenty votes; and provided (2) that when a state is represented by less than ten delegates, said delegates may cast ten votes for each state. Section 3. The term “state” as used herein is to be construed to mean either state, territory, or insular possession. (Upon roll call by states the vote on Mr. Bryan's motion was

taken. The result of this vote is tabulated here with.)

Aye No Total Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2 10 Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1 10 California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 6 9 Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1 13 Connecticut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 Delaware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 District of Columbia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 20 20 Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 Idaho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - Illinois . . 19 19 Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 - - - 10 Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 - - - 10 Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 8 8 Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 20 20 Massachusetts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 20 20 Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 15 15 Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1 10 Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 17 17 Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 - - - 12 Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 - - - 10 New Hampshire - - - 10 10 New Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 16 16 New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 - - - 10 New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 20 20 North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 17 18 Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 5 7 Pennsylvania. .......................... - - - 20 20 Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 South Carolina 10 - - - 10 South Dakota 4 8 12 Tennessee . . . . . . . . . 20 - - - 20

Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10

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Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 - - - 10 Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10 Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 8 11 Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 - - - 11 West Virginia ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 20 20 Wisconsin . ............................ - - - 10 10 Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - 10 10

Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 434 588

CHAIRMAN FISHER—The motion to refer to the Committee on Resolutions is lost. The procedure now reverts to the original motion to adopt the so-called unanimous report of the committee. Are you ready for the question? (Cries of “Question 1 Question") CHAIRMAN FISHER—All in favor of the motion to adopt the so-called unanimous report of the Committee on Water Power will signify it by saying “aye.” (The ayes responded.) Those opposed, “no.” (The noes responded.) The ayes seem to have it overwhelmingly. The ayes have it, and it is a vote. The so-called unanimous report of the Committee on Water Power is adopted by this Congress. MR. AUGUST Koh N, of South Carolina—Mr. Chairman, as I understand it this, by the adoption of the unanimous report of the Committee on Water Power, is considered in the nature of a compromise of the two elements. CHAIRMAN FISHER—I do not quite understand it that way. It represents those points upon which the Committee on Water Power was able to agree unanimously. There are other points about which they were not able to agree, and particularly there were expressions and arguments upon which they were unable to agree. MR. AUGUST KoRN, of South Carolina—Mr. Chairman, in view of the fact that we have had more than a day spent on this particular unanimous report, I think we have had enough of water power now. I therefore move, Mr. Chairman, that the majority and minority reports be recalled from the committee, if they have been sent there, and be received by this Congress as information. CHAIRMAN FISHER—The rules would have to be suspended in order to accomplish that result. The motion, therefore, is not in order. MR. E. B. StAHLMAN, of Tennessee—Mr. Chairman, inasmuch as four distinguished gentlemen who framed the unanimous report differed as to its meaning, it seems to me a good idea to have the Chair define what that report does mean. CHAIRMAN FISHER—As I understand it

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