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For yonder walls, that pertly front your town,
Yon towers, whose wanton tops do buss the clouds,"
Must kiss their own feet.
НЕСТ.

I must not believe you:
There they stand yet; and modestly I think,
The fall of every Phrygian stone will cost
A drop of Grecian blood : The end crowns all;
And that old common arbitrator, time,
Will one day end it.
Ulyss.

So to him we leave it. Most gentle, and most valiant Hector, welcome: After the general, I beseech you next To feast with me, and see me at my tent.

Achil. I shall forestall thee, lord Ulysses, thou!'S

Yon towers, whose wanton tops do buss the clouds,] So, in our author's Rape of Lucrece:

“ Threatening cloud kissing Ilion with annoy." Again, in Pericles, Prince of Tyre, 1609 : “ Whose towers bore heads so high, they kiss'd the

clouds." Nion, according to Shakspeare's authority, was the name of Priam's palace, “that was one of the richest and strongest that ever was in all the world. And it was of height five hundred paces, besides the height of the towers, whereof there was great plenty, and so high as that it seemed to them that saw them from farre, they raught up unto the heaven.The Destruction of Troy, Book II. p. 478. So also Lydgate, sign. F 8, verso:

“ And whan he gan to his worke approche,
“ He made it builde hye upon a roche,
“ It for to assure in his foundation,

“ And called it the noble Ylion.Shakspeare was thinking of this circumstance when he wrote, in the first Act, these lines. Troilus is the speaker :

“ Between our Ilium, and where she resides, [i. e. Troy] • Let it be call'd the wild and wandering flood.”

MALONE. 'I shall forestall thee, lord Ulysses, thou!). Should we not read-though? Notwithstanding you have invited Hector to

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Now, Hector, I have fed mine eyes on thee ;?
I have with exact view perus’d thee, Hector,
And quoted joint by joint.
HECT.

Is this Achilles ?
ACHIL. I am Achilles.
HECT. Stand fair, I pray thee: let me look on thee.

your tent, I shall draw him first into mine. So, in Beaumont and Fletcher's Cupid's Revenge, Act III. sc. i :

O dissembling woman, Whom I must reverence though- TYRWHITT. The repetition of thou! was anciently used by one who meant to insult another. So, in Twelfth-Night : « -if thou thou'st him some thrice, it shall not be amiss. Again, in The Tempest:

Thou ly'st, thou jesting monkey, thou!Again, in the first scene of the fifth Act of this play:

66 -thou tassel of a prodigal's purse, thou!STEEVENS.

Steevens's observations on the use of the word thou are perfectly just, and therefore I agree with Tyrwhitt that we ought to read: “— lord Ulysses, though!" as it could not be the intention of Achilles to affront Ulysses, but merely to inform him, that he expected to entertain Hector before he did.

M. Mason, Mr. Steevens's remark is incontrovertibly true; but Ulysses had not said any thing to excite such contempt. MALONE.

Perhaps the scorn of Achilles arose from a supposition that Ulysses, by inviting Hector immediately after his visit to Agamemnon, designed to represent himself as the person next in rank and consequence to the general of the Grecian forces.

STEEVENS. ? Now, Hector, I have fed mine eyes on thee; ] The hint for this scene of altercation between Achilles and Hector is taken from Lydgate. See p. 178. STEEVENS.

* And quoted joint by joint.] To quote is to observe. So, in Hamlet :

“ I'm sorry that with better heed and judgment

“ I had not quoted him.' Again, in The Two Gentlemen of Verona:

Thu. And how quote you my folly?

Val. I quote it in your jerkin." STEEVENS.

For yonder walls, that pertly front your town,
Yon towers, whose wanton tops do buss the clouds,'
Must kiss their own feet.
НЕСТ. .

I must not believe you:
There they stand yet; and modestly I think,
The fall of every Phrygian stone will cost
A drop of Grecian blood : The end crowns all;
And that old common arbitrator, time,
Will one day end it.
ULYSS.

So to him we leave it. Most gentle, and most valiant Hector, welcome: After the general, I beseech you next To feast with me, and see me at my tent.

Achil. I shall forestall thee, lord Ulysses, thou!

Yon towers, whose wanton tops do buss the clouds,] So, in our author's Rape of Lucrece:

“ Threatening cloud kissing Ilion with annoy.” Again, in Pericles, Prince of Tyre, 1609: “ Whose towers bore heads so high, they kiss'd the

clouds.Ilion, according to Shakspeare's authority, was the name of Priam's palace, “ that was one of the richest and strongest that ever was in all the world. And it was of height five hundred paces, besides the height of the towers, whereof there was great plenty, and so high as that it seemed to them that saw them from farre, they raught up unto the heaven.The Destruction of Troy, Book II. p. 478. So also Lydgate, sign. F 8, verso:

6 And whan he gan to his worke approche,
• He made it builde hye upon a roche,
“ It for to assure in his foundation,

" And called it the noble Ylion." Shakspeare was thinking of this circumstance when he wrote, in the first Act, these lines. Troilus is the speaker :

“ Between our Ilium, and where she resides, [i.e. Troy] “ Let it be call'd the wild and wandering flood.”

MALONE. 'I shall forestall thee, lord - Ulysses, thou!). Should we not read--though? Notwithstanding you have invited Hector to

Now, Hector, I have fed mine eyes on thee;2
I have with exact view perus’d thee, Hector,
And quoted joint by joint.
HECT.

Is this Achilles ?
ACHIL. I am Achilles.
HECT. Stand fair, I pray thee: let me look on thee.

your tent, I shall draw him first into mine. So, in Beaumont and Fletcher's Cupid's Revenge, Act III. sc. i:

O dissembling woman, “ Whom I must reverence though- ." TYRWHITT. The repetition of thou! was anciently used by one who meant to insult another. So, in Twelfth-Night :

if thou thou'st him some thrice, it shall not be amiss." Again, in The Tempest :

Thou ly’st, thou jesting monkey, thou!Again, in the first scene of the fifth Act of this play: “ -thou tassel of a prodigal's purse, thou!STEEVENS.

Steevens's observations on the use of the word thou are perfectly just, and therefore I agree with Tyrwhitt that we ought to read: “_lord Ulysses, though!as it could not be the intention of Achilles to affront Ulysses, but merely to inform him, that he expected to entertain Hector before he did.

M. Mason. Mr. Steevens's remark is incontrovertibly true; but Ulysses had not said any thing to excite such contempt. MALONE.

Perhaps the scorn of Achilles arose from a supposition that Ulysses, by inviting Hector immediately after his visit to Agamemnon, designed to represent himself as the person next in rank and consequence to the general of the Grecian forces.

STEEVENS. * Now, Hector, I have fed mine eyes on thee;] The hint for this scene of altercation between Achilles and Hector is taken from Lydgate. See p. 178. STEEVENS.

* And quoted joint by joint.] To quote is to observe. So, in Hamlet :

“ I'm sorry that with better heed and judgment

“ I had not quoted him.”
Again, in The Two Gentlemen of Verona:

Thu. And how quote you my folly?
Val. I quote it in your jerkin.” STEEVENS.

For yonder walls, that pertly front your town,
Yon towers, whose wanton tops do buss the clouds,'
Must kiss their own feet.
HECT. .

I must not believe you:
There they stand yet; and modestly I think,
The fall of every Phrygian stone will cost
A drop of Grecian blood : The end crowns all;
And that old common arbitrator, time,
Will one day end it.
ULYSS.

So to him we leave it. Most gentle, and most valiant Hector, welcome: After the general, I beseech you next To feast with me, and see me at my tent.

ACHIL. I shall forestall thee, lord Ulysses, thou!

Yon towers, whose wanton tops do buss the clouds,] So, in our author's Rape of Lucrece:

“ Threatening cloud kissing Ilion with annoy.” Again, in Pericles, Prince of Tyre, 1609 : “ Whose towers bore heads so high, they kiss'd the

clouds." Ilion, according to Shakspeare's authority, was the name of Priam's palace, “that was one of the richest and strongest that ever was in all the world. And it was of height five hundred paces, besides the height of the towers, whereof there was great plenty, and so high as that it seemed to them that saw them from farre, they raught up unto the heaven.The Destruction of Troy, Book II. p. 478. So also Lydgate, sign. F 8, verso:

And whan he gan to his worke approche,
“ He made it builde hye upon a roche,
“ It for to assure in his foundation,

“ And called it the noble Ylion." Shakspeare was thinking of this circumstance when he wrote, in the first Act, these lines. Troilus is the speaker :

“ Between our Ilium, and where she resides, [i.e. Troy] “ Let it be call'd the wild and wandering flood."

MALONE. 'I shall forestall thee, lord Ulysses, thou!] Should we not read—though? Notwithstanding you have invited Hector to

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