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CONTENTS.

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CHARLES LAMB: A PREFATORY MEMOIR.

• 3

Dedication to Samuel Taylor Coleridge . . . . . . . . 31

POETICAL WORKS.

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EARLIEST AND LATER SONNETS.

xxiv. An album is a banquet : from

the store.

1. Was it some sweet device of

. .

4

xxv. Lady unknown, who cravest

from me unknown. ....

11. Methinks' how dainiy sweni 33

..it were, reclined i... 33

xxvi. In Christian world Mary the

111. As when a child on some

garland wears . . . . . 42

long winter's night. .... 34

IV. O, I could laugh to hear the

MISCELLANEOUS Poems-

midnight wind . .

Preliminary Motto · · · · ·

v. When last I roved these wind-

Dedication . . . . . . . .

ing wood-walks green. .

Childhood . . . . . . . .

VI. A timid grace sits trembling i

The Grandame . . . . . . .

her eye. . . . . . . . 35

The Sabbath Bells.

VII. If from my lips some angry

Fancy Einployed on Divine sub.

accents fell . . ..

jects . . . . . . . . .

VIII. We were two pretty babes,

The Tomb of Douglas.

the youngest she . :.:,:

To Charles Lloyd: an Unexpected

IX. By Enfield lanes, and Winch-

Visitor . . . . . . . . . . 45

more's verdant hill. ...

x. Forgive me, Burney, if to thee BLANK Verse-

these late . .

To Charles Lloyd

xi. I was not train'd in Academic

Written on the Day of my Aunt's

bowers . . .

Funeral . . . . . . . . . 47

x11. You are not, Kelly, of the Written a Year after the Events . .

common strain

Written soon after the preceding

XIII. Rare artist! who with half

. . . . . 49

thy tools, or none.. .

Written on Christmas Day, 1797 . 50

xiv. Let hate, or grosser heats,

The Old Familiar Faces . . . . 50

their foulness mask ...

Composed at Midnight ..

xv. Who first invented work, and

Living without God in the World : 52

bound the free . .

Thekla's Song . . . . . . . .

XVI. They talk of time, and of time's

galling yoke . . . . . :

POETRY FOR CHILDREN--

38

xvii. Rogers, of all the men that i

Hester : : : : : : : : :

have known . . . . ... 39

The Three Friends . .

xvIII. Suck, baby, suck, mother's To a River in which a Child was

i love grows by giving ::,:

drowned . . . . . . . . .

xix. Queen-bird, that sittest on thy

Queen Oriana's Dream .....

shining nest ...

xx. What reason first imposed MINOR POEMS

thee, gentle name.

A Ballad--Rich and Poor. . . .

xxi. John, you were figuring in

Lines on a Celebrated Picture ..

the gay career . . . . . 40

A Vision of Repentance.

XXII. O lift with reverent hand that

A Farewell to Tobacco . i .

tarnish'd flower . . . . 40

To T. L. H.-A Child . . . .

XXIII. A passing glancé was all I

The Triumph of the Whale

caught of thee : ... 41 A Birthday Thought . .

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ALBUM VERSES-

TRANSLATIONS FROM THE LATIN OF

Dedication to the Publisher . 63

VINCENT BOURNE-continued :

In the Album of a Clergyman's

Cn a Deaf and Dumb Artist . . . 75

Lady . . .

Newton's Principia . . . . . . 75

In the Autograph Book of Mrs. S

The Housekeeper . . . . . . 75

Serjeant W-

The Female Orators . . . . . . 76

In the Album of Lucy Barton :: 64

In the Album of Miss -

Pindaric Ode to the Treadmill . .. 76

In the Album of a Very

Going or Gone

Lady . . . . .

On K. B. Haydon's “ Jerusalem”: :

In the Album of a French Teacher

Translation

In the Album of Miss Daubeny. • 65

To my Friend the Indicator . . . . 79

In my own Album . . . . . .

SATAN IN SEARCH OF A Wife-

Angel Help

Dedication . . . . . . .

The Christening : · · · :·

Part the First . . . . . . . .

On an Infant Dying as soon as Born .

Part the Second · · · · · · ·

To Bernard Barton . . . .

The Young Catechist..

The Three Graves.

She is Going . . . . ..

To Charles Aders, I

es nders, Esq. . . . . .

To a Young Friend. . . .

The Change . .

To the Same .

Existence, considered in itself, no

To James Sheridan Knowles .

blessing ::

To the Editor of the “Every-Day The Parting Spee

The Parting Speech of the Celestiai

Book” . .

Messenger .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

To Caroline Maria Applebee :::

Hercules Pacificatus...'

To Cecilia Catherine Lawton .

Lines suggested by a sight of Wal-
To a Lady who Desired me to write

tham Cross . . . .

her Epitaph. .::· · · · · 71

The Self-Enchanted ::::::

To her Youngest Daughter..: 11 To a Friend on his Marriage . .

To Thomas Stothard, R.A. . . . . 91

TRANSLATIONS FROM THE LATIN OF

To Clara N[ovello) . . . . . . . 91

VINCENT BOURNE-

Hypochondriacus ..

On a Sepulchral statue of an Infant Free Thoughts on Several Eminent

Sleeping . .

Composers . .

.

.

.

.

.

. . . 72

. . . 92

What is an Album?.

The Rival Bells ....... 72

Epitaph on a Dog

To Margaret W-

...... 72

Prologue to Coleridge's " Remorse” : 93

The Ballad Singers . . . . . . 73

To David Cook, Watchman . . . 74 | Epilogue to "The Wife". . . . . 94

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ESSAYS OF ELIA.-Second Series-

continued:

The Tombs in the Abbey ... · 480

Amicus Redivivus ..

Blakesmoor in H- shire. ...

Captain Jackson . . . . . . . 494

Barbara S-

. . . . . 496

The Superannuated Man..

The Convalescent. . . . . . . 504

Stage Illusion . .

· · · 507

The Genteel Style in Writing ..509

Sanity of True Genius . . . . . 511

To the Shade of Elliston . . 513

Ellistoniana. . . . . . . . 515

Newspapers Thirty-five Years Ago. 518

Barrenness of the Imaginative

Faculty in the Productions of

Modern Art . . . . . . . . 522

The Wedding . . . . . . . . 528

Popular Fallacies. . . . . . . 532

i. That a Bully is always as

Coward . . .

11. That III-gotten Gain Never use

11. That a Man must Not Laugh

at his own Jest . . . . 533

iv. That Such a One Shows his 533

Breeding--That it is Easy to

perceive he is no Gertleman 533

v. That the Poor copy the vices

of the Rich . . . . . . 534

vi. That Enough is as good as a

Feast . . : . . . . . . 535

vii. Of Two

utants the

Warmest is Generally in the

Wrong . . . . . . . . 535

. That Verbal Illusions are not

Wit, because they will not

bear Translation . . . . 536

IX. That the Worst Puns are the

Best...::::: 530

x. That you must Love me and

Love my Dog

xi. That we should Rise with the "se

Lark . .

x11. That we should lie down with

the Lamb. ..

That Handsome is that Hand: "**

some does.

. That Home is Home though

it is never so Homely . . . 543

y. That we must not look a Gift.

Horse in the Mouth. . . 546

xvi. That a Deformed Person is a

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Fragments from Burton . . . . . 551

The Reynolds Gallery .

. . . 650

Recollections of Christ's Hos ital. 555

Richard Brome's “Ja

w”, 651

On the Tragedies of Shakspere... 501 Isaac Bickerstaff's ** Hypocrite" .

On the Elizabethan Dramatists. ..

New Pieces at the Lyceum. . . 653

On the Garrick Plays . . . . . . 588

First Fruits of Aurulian Poetry. . 655

On the Genius and Character of

Elia to his Correspondents. .

Hogarth .

593 The Gentle Giantess . . . . . 658

on the Poetical Works of George i On a Passage in “The Tempest". .

Wither.

Original Letter of James Thomson ..

Notes on Specimens from Fuller ::

Letter to an Old Gentleman whose

On the Inconveniences Resulting from

| Education has been Neglected ..

being Hanged . . .

A Vision of Horns.

... 667

on the Danger of Confounding oo

Biographical Memoir of Mr. Liston . 671

Moral with Personal Deformity. . 614 Autobiography of Mr. Munden .. 675

.617 Reflections in the Pillory . . . . . 677

On the Ambiguities arising from ? The Last Peach . . . . . . . . 679

Proper Names . .

The Illustrious Defunct . . . . .

on tehes Custom of Hissing at the 0.22 The Religion of Actors ·.:· ·

Theatres.

The Monthses of Sir Jeffery Dun-

On Burial Societies; and the

? Reminiscences of

racter of an Undertaker . . . . 627

stan

Edax on Appetite . . . . .

Captain Starkey ::::::::

Hospita on the Immoderate Indul-

The Ass. . . . . . . . . . 591

gence of the Palate . . . . . . 634 In re Squirrels i

The Good Clerk, A Character.. 636 Estimate of Defoe's Secondary Novels

On the Melancholy of Tailors ... 640 : Recollections of a Late Royal

The Londoner.

The London'Excursion": :

.

: 643

643

Academician ia jaie Elia : : :700

Wordsworth's “Excursion". . . . 644 Table Talk, by the Late Elia . i . 700

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ILLUSTRATIONS.
Portrait of Charles Lamb by Henry Meyer . . . .
Facsimiles-1. Sonnet xxv.

“In Christian world Mary the garland wears " .
“I'll cock my hat and draw my sword"
“No wonder girls in country towns
On Roast Hare . .

On Munden's Acting.
6. The True Barbara S--

. Frontispiece
(Opposite page) 42

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100

436
445

496

Dedication

TO.

SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE.

(The following dedicatory epistle was prefixed to the first collected edition of Charles Lamb's Works, published in two volumes octavo by Charles and J. Ollier, in 1818-not a word of Elia being then written. The asterisks refer to the sign of “The Salutation and Cat," at No. 17, Newgate Street, an old-fashioned tavern, in the wainscoted parlour of which Coleridge and Lamb used often to meet of nights during the former's occasional visits to London while he was yet a student at Cambridge.]

MY DEAR COLERIDGE,You will smile to see the slender labours of your friend designated by the title of Works: but such was the wish of the gentlemen who have kindly undertaken the trouble of collecting them, and from their judgment could be no appeal.

It would be a kind of disloyalty to offer to any one but yourself a volume containing the early pieces, which were first published among your poems, and were fairly derivatives from you and them. My friend Lloyd and myself came into our first battle (authorship is a sort of warfare) under cover of the greater Ajax. How this association, which shall always be a dear and proud recollection to me, came to be broken, --who snapped the threefold cord, -whether yourself (but I know that was not the case) grew ashamed of your former companions,-or whether (which is by much the more probable) some ungracious bookseller was author of the separation, I cannot tell;- but wanting the support of your friendly elm (I speak for myself), my vine has, since that time, put forth few or no fruits; the sap (if ever it had any) has become, in a manner, dried up and extinct : and you will find your old associate, in his second volume, dwindled into prose and criticism.

Am I right in assuming this as the cause? or is it that, as years come upon us (except with some more healthy-happy spirits), life itself loses much of its poetry for us? we transcribe but what we read in the great volume of Nature ; and, as the characters grow dim, we turn off, and look another way. You yourself write no Christabels, nor Ancient Mariners, now.

Some of the Sonnets, which shall be carelessly turned over by the general reader, may happily awaken in you remembrances, which I should be sorry should be ever totally extinct—the memory

Of summer days and, of delightful years—

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