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CRISTOBAL. See OCEAN MAIL SERVICE, 4.
CUSTOMS, COLLECTOR OF. See VESSELS, 1, 2.
DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS. See POSTAL SAVINGS SYSTEM, 6, 7.
DEPOSITORIES FOR POSTAL SAVINGS FUNDS. See POSTAL

SAVINGS SYSTEM, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.
DEPUTY CLERKS OF DISTRICT COURTS. See OFFICIAL BONDS, 3.
DEPUTY PUBLIC PRINTER. See GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, 3.
DISBURSING CLERK, CENSUS BUREAU.

BUREAU. See COMMERCE AND LABOR, DEPARTMENT OF. DISTRICT COURT OF UNITED STATES, P. R. See Porto Rico, 14. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 1. Civil Service.—Under existing laws the classified service of the

United States can not be extended to the officers and employees

of the District of Columbia. 410. 2. Correction of Records of War Dcpartment Relating to Land Titles.

The authority of the Secretary of War to make correction of the records of the lar Department in respect of certain lots in the District of Columbia, provided for by section 2 of the act of March 3, 1899 (30 Stat. 1346), was not suspended by section 26 of the act of May 30, 1908 (35 Stat. 544), creating a commission •for the purpose of investigating the title of the United States

in and to all lands in the District of Columbia." 40. 3. Same.- Section 26 of the act of May 30, 1908 (35 Stat. 544), is

entirely consistent with section 2 of the act of March 3, 1899 (30 Stat. 1316), and the latter provision is not repealed by the

former. Ib. 4. Validity of Certificate of Purchase-Isaac Polock.-A certificate

of purchase of certain lots in the city of Washington, which was executed July 22, 1797, by the commissioners in favor of Isaac Polock but was not recorded until May 30, 1804, did not vest the legal title in the purchaser for the reason that the law then in force required it to be recorded within six months from the

date thereof in order to have legal effect. 1. 5. Same--Quitclaim Deed.—While the certificate in question did not

convey the legal estate, yet it passed an equitable interest in the land, and, being equivalent to a contract of sale by the commissioriers, the execution of a quitclaim deed to the clainants by the Chief Engineer of the Army is not prohibited by the act of May 30, 1908 (35 Stat. 544), but such deed executed

by him will be valid. Ib. DIVIDENDS ON DEPOSITS. See Postal SAVINGS SYSTEM, 1. DOMINICAN REPUBLIC.

EXPORT OF ARMS TO. See ARMS AND MUNITIONS OF WAR, 6. DREDGING CONTRACTS. See EIGHT-HOUR LAW, 11, 12. EGGS, FROZEN. See SEIZURES.

EIGHT-HOUR LAW. 1. Ammunition. --The requirement of law that a contractor for

ammunition shall have established an eight-hour workday for all of his employees engaged upon the work under contract is to be construed as prohibiting his working such employees more

than eight hours a day. 188. 2. Same.—The eight-hour workday restriction of this proviso does

not apply to purchases of ammunition made abroad. 488. 3. Construction of Colliers.-- The provision in the act of March 1,

1911 (36 Stat. 1288), under the head of “Construction and machinery,” establishing an eight-hour workday, has reference to the construction of battleships and not colliers, and the fact that a contractor for one of the battleships may also contract for one or more colliers would not require the work on the colliers

to be carried on on an eight-hour-a-day basis. 35. 4. Construction of Naval Vessels. The provisions in the naval appro

priation act of March 4, 1911 (36 Stat. 1288), relating to an eighthour workday for employees engaged in the construction of the vessels therein authorized, are not limited to the employees of contractors but apply to employees of subcontractors engaged

in the actual construction of said vessels. 279. 5. Same. -Under the eight-hour restrictions of said act, the person,

firm, or corporation actually constructing any of the vessels therein specified must establish an eight-hour workday for all of its employees engaged in making any of the parts of the ves

sels and in assembling those parts upon their completion. Ib. 6. Same.—These eight-hour restrictions prohibit the working of

employees more than eight hours a day in the construction of said vessels and their machinery, and they can not be nullified by permitting the employees by contract with their employers

to work overtime for additional compensation. Ib. 7. Same. - The provision in the naval appropriation act of March 4,

1911 (36 Stat. 1287), requiring the person, firm, or corporation constructing any of the vessels therein specified to establish an eight-hour workday for all of its employees, does not authorize the establishment of a schedule by which the employees work

more than eight hours in any one day. 371. 8. Same.-A schedule by which employees work 81 or 81 hours on

five days in the week and 4 or 5 hours on Saturday, making a total of 48 hours in each week, is prohibited by the eight-hour

workday restriction in said act of 1911. Ib. 9. Contracts for the Purchase of Supplies by the Government.-The

eight-hour workday restriction of the act of June 19, 1912, known as the eight-hour law, applies to contracts for the purchase of supplies by the Government where the work incident to the manufacture thereof has ordinarily been performed by the Government up to the time of the making of the contract therefor and not merely occasionally or to a limited extent, and it is immaterial whether the contractor furnishes both materials and labor or labor only. 505.

EIGHT-HOUR LAW-Continued. 10. Same.-The said act of June 19, 1912, becomes effective January 1,

1913, and hence only contracts thereafter made are required to contain the eight-hour restriction and the penalty stipulation

provided for therein. Ib. 11. Dredging Contracts.--Under the operation of the eight-hour law

of June 19, 1912 (37 Stat. 137), it will not be necessary to report the cases of any persons working more than eight hours a day upon any vessel engaged in dredging under a Government contract, irrespective of whether such persons are connected with the vessel as a part of its crew in its operation and management or are only employed thereon in the particular work of dredging

and handling material. 583. 12. Same.-Status of Employee.—Where the administrative officer in

charge is in doubt as to whether a dredging contract involves the employment of laborers or mechanics, the wisest course is to insert in the contract the eight-hour restriction required by the act of June 19, 1912, leaving the status of any particular person as to whom the question is raised to be determined by the actual

facts of his employment. Ib. 13. Laborers at Customs Ports.-- The act of August 1, 1892 (27 Stat.

310), known as the eight-bour law, includes in its scope such of the laborers employed at the various customs ports as are actually engaged in manual labor, and as to these laborers the act of March 15, 1898 (30 Stat. 316), has not repealed the provisions of the said

eight-hour law. 481. 14. Same.-The extension-of-hours act of March 15, 1898 (30 Stat.

316), applies only to employees in the departments at the seat

of government. Ib. 15. Repairs to Government Vessels.—The employment of laborers and

mechanics in making repairs to Government vessels is employment upon a public work of the United States, and is therefore subject to the restrictions of the eight-hour law of August 1, 1892

(27 Stat. 310). 395. 16. Status of Claims for Labor and Material.-The Attorney General

declines to express an opinion as to what, if any, steps must be taken under the proviso by the contracting officer, and what is the status of claims presented for payment for labor and material furnished under a contract, in the event that a contractor who had actually announced an eight-hour workday before obtaining his contract should afterwards for any reason revert to a

longer workday, as the question is hypothetical. 488. 17. Work Contemplated by the Contract.—The eight-hour workday

restriction of the act of June 19, 1912, known as the eight-hour law, applies only to work contemplated by the contract. The words "work contemplated by the contract” include the work directly and proximately in view in the contract as specifically appropriated to and destined for the Government use. 534.

EIGHT-HOUR LAW-Continued. 18. Same.---The word “supplies” and the phrase “such materials or

articles as may usually be bought in open market" are practically synonymous and cover things which are had in store or stock. Whether a particular article or material falls within this exception to the eight-hour provision is generally a matter

of administration. Ib. 19. Same.- Projectiles.-Contracts for the purchase of projectiles are

not excepted from the operation of the eight-hour restriction, but only the work done in assembling the parts, treating the forging or casting, and machining the projectiles would be "work contemplated by the contract” unless the casting and other parts were manufactured solely and exclusively for the purpose of

making the projectiles. 534. 20. Same.-Smokeless powder is manufactured ordinarily by the

Government, and hence contracts for the purchase thereof are

subject to the eight-hour restriction. 534. EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. 1. Fiftieth Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.-It

within the power of the President to issue a general proclamation calling the attention of the people of the country to the fiftieth anniversary of the issuance of the emancipation proclamation and inviting them to unite in an appropriate celebration

of that event. 52. 2. Same.---1f, however, it is desired that especial national observance

be paid to the anniversary of the issuance of the emancipation proclamation by making it a legal holiday and providing for appropriate services under national auspices, the matter should he brought to the attention of Congress, to the end that the appropriate enactment be had by the passage of a bill or joint

resolution. Ib. EMBEZZLEMENT. See Navy, 1, 2, 3, 4. EMPLOYEES OF CONTRACTORS. See EIGHT-HOUR Law, 7, 8,

9, 10.
EMPLOYEES OF UNITED STATES. See CIVIL SERVICE.
EMPLOYER'S LIABILITY. See SEAMEN.
EQUIPMENT OF VESSELS. See VESSELS, 6, 7.
ERIE RAILROAD CO.

Transportation of Letters Outside the Mail.—The Erie Railroad

Co. has the right under section 184 of the Penal Code (35 Stat. 1124) to transport over its lines, otherwise than in the mail, letters written by the secretary of the Erie Employees' Relief Association, an organization composed of officers and employees of that railroad, to the railroad company, but can not transport letters written by the officers of said relief association to its members. 418.

FISHERIES BUREAU, SEATTLE, WASH.

LOCAL AGENT, APPOINTMENT. See (OMMERCE AND LABOR, SEC

RETARY OF, 3.
FISHERIES, DEPUTY COMMISSIONER.

APPOINTMENT. See PRESIDENT, 2.
FOLSOM MORRIS COAL MINING CO. Sce COMMODITIES CLAUSE

OF HEPBURN ACT, 1, 3.
FOOD AND DRUGS ACT.
1. Authority to Make Rules and Regulations and Review Findings

of Fact.—The Secretaries of the Treasury, Agriculture, and
Commerce and Labor are restricted to the making of rules and
regulations for carrying oui the provisions of the food and drugs
act of June 30, 1906 (34 Stat. 768), and have no authority to
review findings of fact and reports made to the Secretary of

Agriculture. 494.
2. Same.-The findings of the Referee Board of the Department of

Agriculture are not conclusive on the courts or the Secretary of

Agriculture, but are simply for the information of the latter. Ib. 3. Same.-The approval of the Secretary of Agriculture of a finding

of the Referee Board is notice to the public that in subsequent

examinations of food samples such finding will be followed. Ib.
FOREIGN CORPORATIONS. See PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, 8, 9, 10.
FOREIGN MAILS. See OCEAN MAIL SERVICE, 3, 4.
FOREIGN PORTS. See OCEAN MAIL SERVICE, 3, 4, 5; PANAMA, 2;

VESSELS, 11.
FOREIGN TUGBOAT. See VESSELS, 3.
FOREIGN VESSELS. See VESSELS, 11.
FOREST RESERVES.

The authority to grant easements for rights of way for electrical.

telephone and telegraph purposes, as contemplated by the agri-
cultural appropriation act of March 4, 1911 (36 Stat. 1253), is
vested in the Secretary of Agriculture when and in so far as the
lands to be affected constitute portions of the national forests.

303.
FORFEITURE. See OPIUM, ); PENALTIES, 3.
FREIGHT RATES. See PANAMA, 1.
FROZEN EGGS. See SEIZURES.
GOOD ROADS BONDS.

Wilson TOWNSHIP, N. C. See POSTAL SAVINGS SYSTEM, 19, 20.
GOODS IMPORTED FOR ARMY. See PHIPILLINE ISLANDS, 3.
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.
1. Public Printer-Acceptance of Estimates for Supplies.-Estimates

furnished by the Public Printer, as provided for by section 2 of
the act of March 3, 1883 (22 Stat. 527), for supplying the money-
order service with forms and blank books, may be accepted
which are submitted subsequent to the final date for the receipt
of proposals from private bidders. 329.

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