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SHIP'S EQUIPAGE. See VESSELS, 6, 7.
SMOKELESS POWDER. See EIGHT-HOUR LAW, 20.
SMOKING OPIUM. See OPIUM, 2, 3, 4.
SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD CO. See RAILROAD LAND GRANTS,

1, 2.
STATUTORY CONSTRUCTION. See CONSTRUCTION OF STATUTES.
STEAMER JOHN B. KETCHAM 2D. See VESSELS, 8, 9.
STEAMSHIP EUROPA. See VESSELS, 10.
SUPPLIES. See EIGHT-HOUR LAW, 18.
SURGEON GENERAL.

SELECTION. See PUBLIC HEALTH AND MARINE-HOSPITAL SERVICE.
TELEGRAPH. See FOREST RESERVES.
TELEPHONE. See FOREST RESERVES.
TIMBER.

FROM UNALLOTTED LANDS. See INDIANS, 3.
TITLE TO LANDS. See DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 2, 3, 4, 5.
TORPEDOES. See COMBINATIONS AND MONOPOLIES, 9.
TOXINS. See VIRUSES.
TOY CAP PISTOLS. See ARMS AND MUNITIONS OF WAR, 8.
TRANSPORTATION.

OF LETTERS OUTSIDE THE MAIL. See ERIE RAILROAD Co.
OF PASSENGERS INTO FOREIGN WATERS, ETC. See VESSELS, 11.

PANAMA RAILROAD. See PANAMA, 1.
TREASURER OF UNITED STATES.

Bonds. See OFFICIAL BONDS, 1, 2, 3. TREASURY, SECRETARY OF.

AUTHORITY TO BESTOW LIFE-SAVING MEDALS. See PHILIPPINE

ISLANDS, 5.
AUTHORITY TO REMIT SEIZURE. See SEIZURES.

FOOD AND DRUGS Act. See FOOD AND DRUGS Act, 1.
TRUSTS. See COMBINATIONS AND MONOPOLIES.
TUSCALOOSA, ALA.

Bonds. See POSTAL SAVINGS SYSTEM, 8. ULTRA VIRES TRANSACTIONS. See NATIONAL BANKS, 3. UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT, PORTO RICO. See PORTO

Rico, 14. VESSELS. 1. Clearance of Vessels—Importation of Opium not Included in

Manifest.-A collector of customs has no right to refuse clearance of a vessel, used as a common carrier, because of the nonpayment of a fine imposed under section 2809 of the Revised Statutes, for bringing into the United States merchandise not included in the manifest, unless the master or owner of the vessel was consenting to the illegal act or privy thereto. 364.

VESSELS—Continued. 2. Same-Enforcing Penalty.—Where the vessel is not used as a

common carrier, the Government has, by virtue of section 3088 of the Revised Statutes, a lien on the vessel for the penalty thus incurred by the master, and may enforce that lien by libel and seizure; but where the vessel is used as a common carrier, and the owner or master thereof is not a consenting party to the illegal act, or privy thereto, the only remedy appears to be an

action against the master. Ib. 3. A foreign tugboat clearing from Vancouver, British Columbia,

with logs in tow, some of which are destined to Anacortes, Wash., and the remainder to Bellingham, Wash., may lawfully be permitted, after arrival at Anacortes and delivery there of the logs consigned to that port, to proceed to Bellingham with the remain

ing logs in tow for delivery there. 572. 4. Government Contract—Partial Payment.—The general rule would

seem to be well recorgnized that, in the absence of statutory prohibition, partial payments may be made on account of work done in the construction of vessels for the Navy if (1) title to the vessel shall have passed to the United States at the time of such payments, or (2) a lien shall have been created by law or contract upon the unfinished vessel to the amount of such partial

payments. 46. 5. Registry and Enrollment.-A vessel belonging to a domestic cor

poration is entitled to registry or enrollment, even though some

stock of the company be owned by aliens. 188. 6. Reissued Articles of Ship’s Equipage Chargeable to Annual Ap

propriation for Equipment of Vessels.”—Under the acts of June 25, 1910, and March 4, 1911 (26 Stat. 792, 1279), creating the naval supply account, articles of equipage of ships, which in prior fiscal years had been purchased and paid for under the appropriation “Equipment of vessels” and which had been turned into store from ships going out of commission, should be again charged against the annual appropriation for “Equipment of vessels” when they are reissued to the vessels upon their going

into commission. 344. 7. Same.-Under said act of March 4, 1911, the Secretary of the Navy

is authorized, whenever the interests of the Naval Establishment require it, to direct that “surveyed material taken from repairs made to ships or plant at navy yards and stations” and "stores turned in from ships” going out of commission should not be charged to the naval supply account, the word “materials” as used throughout the acts in question being intended to in

clude articles forming part of a ship's equipage. Ib. 8. Steamer “John B. Ketcham No. 2"Removal from West Nee

bish Channel.—The claim of the Reid Wrecking Co. against the Government for services in removing the steamer John B. Ketcham No. 2 from the West Neebish Channel should be paid

VESSELS—Continued.

and that company should not be required, as a condition precedent to the payment of its claim, to bring the vessel within the jurisdiction of the United States since said vessel has been

sold under appropriate judicial proceedings. 276. 9. Same. The statute under which this claim arises makes no

provision for the payment of interest, therefore none can be

paid. Ib. 10. Steamship "Europa” Carrying Passengers into the Port of New

York Without Certificate of Inspection.—The steamship Europa, a private vessel of Italian nationality, which was engaged in carrying passengers upon a regularly established line between the ports of the United States and European ports, sailed from the port of New York with a certificate of inspection but arrived back at New York more than 30 days after the expiration of such certificate, did not thereby violate any of the provisions of title 52, Revised Statutes, for the reason that foreign vessels are subject to inspection only when carrying passengers from

the United States. 19. 11. Transportation of Passengers into Foreign Waters and Back to

Port of Departure.—The transportation of passengers by foreign vessels from a port in the United States through domestic and foreign waters, sometimes touching at a foreign port, and returning them to the port of departure, is not in violation of section 8 of the act of June 19, 1886 (24 Stat. 81), as amended by section 2

of the act of February 17, 1898 (30 Stat. 248). 318. CONSTRUCTION OF NAVAL VESSELS. See EIGHT-HOUR LAW,

4, 5, 6, 7, 8.
LIABILITY OF OWNERS FOR HOSPITAL CHARGES. See SEAMEN.
LOADING AT COLON WHARF, ENTERS UNITED STATES AS FROM

FOREIGN PORT. See PANAMA, 2.
MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTS. See CONTRACTS, 1.
PURCHASE OF STRUCTURAL MATERIAL FOR VESSELS. See Cou-

BINATIONS AND MONOPOLIES, 3, 4, 5.

REMISSION OF PENALTIES. See PENALTIES, 1, 3. VIRUSES, SERUMS, ETC.

The importation or admission into the United States of viruses,

serums, toxins, and analogous products, that are prepared by and sold or given away by a foreign unlicensed establishment to individuals or institutions in the United States for their use and not for sale, barter, or exchange by such individuals or institutions, is not contrary to the provisions of the act of July 1, 1902 (32 Stat. 728), regulating the sale of viruses, serums, etc.

340. WEST END, ALA.

BONDS. See POSTAL SAVINGS SYSTEM, 9.

WHITE MOUNTAIN APACHE INDIAN RESERVATION.

SALE OF TIMBER. See INDIANS, 3. WHITEHEAD TORPEDOES. See COMBINATIONS AND MONOPOLIES, 9. WILLAMETTE FALLS, OREG.

In the purchase and construction of a canal and locks around

Willamette Falls, at Oregon City, Oreg., provided for by the river and harbor act of June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. 630), the appropriation authorized may be expended in the prosecution of the work, notwithstanding the total cost may exceed the amount

of the appropriation. 236. . WILSON TOWNSHIP, N. C.

Good Roads Bonds. See PostAL SAVINGS SYSTEM, 19. WIRELESS TELEGRAPH. See RADIO COMMUNICATION, 1, 2. WOLFF, ELIAS A.

NATURALIZATION. See Porto Rico, 8. WORDS AND PHRASES. 1. "Ammunition.”—The practical meaning of the word “ammuni

tion,” as used in the proviso in the fortification act of June 6, 1912, under the heading of “Armament of fortifications,” is much for the determination of the departments for which it is especially intended, and as this proviso is mainly for the guidance of the War and Navy Departments and those purchasing material for them, it may well be taken that the generally accepted meaning of the word in these departments was the

one intended. 488. 2. "Arms and munitions of war.”—The words "arms or munitions of

war, ” within the meaning of the joint resolution of March 14, 1912, authorizing the President by proclamation to prohibit the export of arms or munitions of war to any American country in which conditions of domestic violence are found to exist, embrace weapons used for the destruction of life, together with ammunition and equipment useful in connection with them, and explosives and other equipment of a military character, or

articles used for the construction of such equipment. 375. 3. “Establishments.”—The provisions of the act of June 30, 1906

(34 Stat. 674), in relation to the inspection of “establishments,” cover all “establishments” where meat food products are prepared, wherever the meat which goes into them may have

come from. 227. 4. “Formerly in free Public Library.”—The provision in the legis

lative, executive, and judicial appropriation act of August 23, 1912, for an assistant in the division for the blind in the Library of Congress, creates a particular position but does not designate the particular person who is to fill it; the phrase “formerly in the free Public Library,” is merely descriptive of the character of the duties of the position created. 532.

WORDS AND PHRASES-Continued. 5. "Herein.”—The word “herein ” when employed in an act of

Congress ordinarily and unless the context makes necessary a

different construction means "in this act.” 35. 6. "Materials.”—Under act of March 4, 1911 (26 Stat. 792, 1279),

the Secretary of the Navy is authorized, whenever the interests of the Naval Establishment require it, to direct that “surveyed material taken from repairs made to ships or plant at navy yards and stations" and "stores turned in from ships” going out of commission should not be charged to the naval supply account, the word “materials” as used throughout the acts in question being intended to include articles forming part of a

ship's equipage. 344. 7. “Officers of the United States.”—Deputy clerks of the district

courts of the United States are "officers of the United States" within the meaning of the provision of the urgent deficiency appropriation act of August 5, 1909 (36 Stat. 118, 125), which limits the rate of premium on official bonds of officers and

employees of the United States. 593. 8. “Organized under National and State laws.”—A bank is “organ

ized under National or State laws,” within the meaning of section 9 of the postal saving depositories act of June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. 816), when it is incorporated, or clothed with the essential attributes of a corporation by virtue of legislative

sanction. 368. 9. "Route.”—The word "route, as used in section 1 of the act of

March 3, 1891 (26 Stat. 830), means the course or way to be trav

eled in going from one place to another. 389. 10. “Shall be Expended for the Purchase of Structural Steel, Ship

Plates, Armor, Armament, or Machinery.”—The provision of the naval appropriation act of March 4, 1911 (36 Stat. 1289), that no part of the money therein appropriated "shall be expended for the purchase of structural steel, ship plates, armor, armament, or machinery” from any combination or monopoly refers only

to purchases made directly by the Navy Department. 44. 11. "Such Materials or Articles as may Usually be Bought in Open

Market.”—The word “supplies” and the phrase "such materials or articles as may usually be bought in open market” are practically synonymous and cover things which are had in store or stock. Whether a particular article or material falls within this exception to the eight-hour provision is generally a matter of

administration. 12. “Supplies.”—The word “supplies" and the phrase "such materi

als or articles as may usually be bought in open market” are practically synonymous and cover things which are had in store or stock. Whether a particular article or material falls within this exception to the eight-hour provision is generally a matter

of administration. 534. 89760°-VOL 29_13 42

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