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TALKIN

The Wood-Allen Publishing Co. (Ann Arbor, Mich.,) send out a little booklet, “ The Cigarette and the Youth,” to assist in combating the evil of cigarette-smoking by children and youth. It is a bright, stirring little pamphlet, admirably adapted for its purpose. Single copy five cents.

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Read “The University School," in this number. No matter whether you believe in it or not, read all you find concerning it. It Dr. John Dewey of Chicago University, does not undertake

aimless work. No teacher can read the literature conEditor's Page

cerning the working of this school and not grow broader.

There is no mechanism, no grooves, and the complete March

absence of these alone ought to set a teacher to thinking. One can do a great deal this month in getting ready for spring in a very quiet way. It is a month to see the little The Esthetic Element in Nature Study indications of coming events with a hope in the voice and

Every teacher who knows the help and inspiration which a cheer in the manner. It is all well enough to have a little

Mr. Henry F. Bailey (State Supervisor of Drawing, Masslaugh occasionally over the blowiness of the month and to enter into the whirl of it once in a while “just for the fun of phase he touches it, will hail with delight his return to the

achusetts) gives to the artistic element in life, in whatever it." But it hardly seems best to make too much of that

columns of PRIMARY EDUCATION. A most attractive series feature of March; and above all, teachers, don't call it Nature's " house-cleaning ” month. The world is prosaic tive but helpful and inspiring. The world is as we see it,

by Mr. Bailey opens in this number; and not only attracand material enough at its best, and don't let us introduce

and Mr. Bailey looks with reverent eyes through rainbow the brush and broom "image" into the minds of our chil

lens at a world made fresh in springtime beauty. May he dren whenever March is mentioned. But it is the month

teach us how to see. when a thousand little live things underground are waking up and stretching out their tiny hands and feet just as little babies wake after a sleep. The children will understand

Music, Song, and Story” that and feel a sort of reverence for the very ground they The publisher of this new magazine might have added step on, since there is so much of life and movement Beauty" to its title with full claim for its appropriateness. beneath it. Who told all these little roots and seeds that it It combines among other attractions stories of a high order, was time to awake? Ah, there you touch the mystery of it poems, songs, fine illustrations and sixteen pages of lithoall a mystery that will make tenderer the heart of every graphed music, vocal and piano, besides a song for children child, if it is brought before him in just the right way, and with music. Price ten cents a copy. It is well worth sendat the right time. The timeliness of talking of these things ing for. S. W. Simpson, 70 Fith Ave., N. Y. City. is a great secret in giving and deepening impressions.

Beautiful Pictures
How Many are we Practising?

Mrs. E. M. Perry (Malden, Mass.) furnishes pictures Frances Willard says: “I am grateful for the diet reform, (51 x 8 inches) of fine quality on good paper, for school for the dress reform, for the take-a-good-time-as-you-go use, at one cent each. Send stamps for catalogue and reform, for the out-doorsy reform and exercise for women samples. 150 subjects for every grade of schools. reform." This list is an excellent prescription for teachers

a rare opportunity to familiarize children with standard to help them through the “ trying " spring months of lassi- pictures. tude and examination fevers. Try it.

Send to Eaton & Co., Chicago for F. Lilian Taylor's First Do Yours?

Reader, 25 cents. (See notice in this issue.) A teacher visited a very poor school the other day, and

To Contributors
while she found much to disappoint and disapprove she
was able to say this one good, good thing about it: “Her

The calendar for the coming year will be as follows:
Matter for Oct.

due children picked up their feet when they walked.” Do

Aug. I yours?

Sept. 1

Jan.
The Speer Arithmetic

Dec. I, etc. For twelve months PRIMARY EDUCATION has given gen- Always remember that all contributions must be received erous place to the theory and practical illustration of TWO MONTHS BEFORE publication. what has come to be known as the “ Speer Arithmetic." No other paper began as early or has done as much as this

New Books for Primary Teachers magazine in giving clear and full explanations of this system of teaching number. The series closed with the February by Jessie L. Gaynor. (The John Church Company, Cincinnati.)

Songs of the Child-World.” Words by Alice C. D. Riley. Music installment, and it is hoped that every teacher who has

“ Around the World.” First Book. By Stella W. Carroll and Clarence taken the paper since these articles began will keep them

F. Carroll. (The Morse Company, N. Y. City.) for future reference. The critics are aiming sharp arrows “Curious Homes and Their Tenants." By James Carter Beard. (D. at so bright a target as this popular method of “ ratio" Appleton & Co., N. Y. City.) teaching, and time will prove whether or not it will “ Among the Meadow People.” By Clara Dillingham Pierson. (E. “ stand fire.” In the meantime hold fast to this series of P. Dutton & Co., N.Y. City.) articles written by two school principals, who wrote from daily “Stepping Stones to Literature II, III.” By Sarah Louise Arnold and

Charles B. Gilbert. (Silver, Burdett & Co., Boston.) experience in this method and abundant opportunities to observe their own teachers at work and the results obtained

"A New Book of the Fairies.” By Beatrice Harraden. (E. P.

Dutton & Co., N. Y. City.) by the children. There has been no speculation about

“When Life is Young." By Mary Mapes Dodge. (The Century Co., their work. But why not begin, teachers, at the very N. Y. City beginning, as outlined in clear detail in this paper (Jan., First Reader. Home and School Series. By F. Lilian Taylor. 1897) and test it for yourselves.

(Eaton & Co., Chicago.)

“ Nov.
« Dec.
«
« Feb.

Oct. I Nov. I

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A Party

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The Merry

Merry War Between Jack Frost and the Sunbeam Fairies

The Sun said, one March morning, “ It is time Jack Frost went home."

Jack Frost heard, and answered: “The little boys and girls love me; I think I will stay all summer.

I know they would like to have a sleighride on the Fourth of July.” And he was so pleased with the idea that he laughed out loud, and ran after some children that were on their way to school, and pinched their ears. And the children laughed and said, “Ho! ho ! I feel Jack Frost ! Let's run so fast he can't catch us !” So they ran all the way to school, and he did not have a chance to pinch them again.

And again the sun said, " It is time Jack Frost went home."

And Jack Frost began to feel very uncomfortable, for the Sun shone very bright and was very warm. “Dear me!” said he, “I am very uncomfortable. If I can't stop that Sun from shining, I am afraid I shall have to go home or melt. Something will have to be done about it."

And what do you think he did? He went to his friends the Snow Clouds, and said, “Snow Clouds, I want to stay in New York all summer. I know the children miss me when I go away. I don't believe they have a bit good time after I am gone, with nothing but the great hot Sun pouring down upon them.”

You see, Jack Frost knew nothing about all the beautiful flowers, and the grass, and the leaves on the trees, and the peaches and the pears and the peas and the beans we have in summer, for just as soon as the sun began to shine more warmly on the earth in the month of March, Jack Frost had to run away

away up north to his own home among the icebergs and snow. If you should show him a peach he would think perhaps it was just some dear little child's rosy cheek, and give it a pinch and kiss it just for fun.

Jack Frost loved the Snow Clouds, and the Snow Clouds loved Jack Frost, and knew just what he wanted. “All right,” said the Snow Clouds; “we won't let the Sun shine on the earth any more." And one fierce looking Snow Cloud said : “ Too bad none of the dear little children in New York have ever seen an iceberg! Let us help make one out in the harbor for them.”

And all the Snow Clouds were so pleased at the idea that they tumbled over each other and went whirling away toward New York in such a hurry and a flurry that they reached there before the Sun was up. And what do you

think the children saw when they woke up the next morning? Clouds of gray up in the sky, and snow everywhere. All day they watched the snow pile up over everything, on the roofs of the houses and on the window sills, on the lamp-posts and on the telegraph wires, on the fences and on the pavements, and even on the tops of umbrellas that were walking down the street. And it snowed, and it snowed, and it snowed ; and Jack Frost laughed, and laughed, and laughed. “Ha, ha!” said he; “isn't this fun? Such a lot of snow will never melt! And away he flew and nipped the horses' ears to make them prance, and hear the sleigh-bells ring, for that was the music: Jack Frost loved best. And the colder it grew the better he liked it, and the beautiful big sun smiled to see Jack Frost so happy.

“But Jack Frost must go home," said the Sun. And what do you think happened? What do you think the children saw when they woke up the next morning? The beautiful big Sun 'way up in the sky, and all the warm March Sunbeam Fairies busy at work getting the world ready for the birds and the flowers that were coming. And Jack Frost

Primary Reading Jack Frost had a good-by party just before he went away.

It was a working party. Southwind, Sunbeam and Cloudlet were there. Many little fairies came too.

Jack said, “Let us help Mother Earth get ready for spring !"

“ We will wake our little brothers and sisters who have slept all winter."

“ They will be glad to help us."

So Jack went to work with his ice plows, and broke up the hard ground.

The noise awoke the pretty pink earthworms.

They set to work carrying tiny loads of rich loam to the surface.

The farmer saw this and said, “It will soon be time for me to plow.”

“ Now we will unlock the little streamlets,” said Jack.

The happy waters came dancing out. They were glad to be free again.

They sang, “ Now we can make othes happy." “We will sing for the children.”

“We will sing for Chip, and Bunny, and Little Wildflower."

“We will make the mill wheels go.” “We will carry sands to the sea.”

Sunbeam, Cloudlet and Southwind knew where every little seed lay sleeping. They went together and lifted the coverlets.

The sleepy seeds felt a gentle shake and a warm kiss. They awoke good-natured and hungry.

Cloudlet gave them a morning bath.

Southwind and Sunbeam helped to get them a good breakfast.

Then the little seeds went to work.

“We will grow into the best flowers and fruits that we can,” they said.

“We will grow to make others happy."

Southwind said to Honey Bee, “ Have you heard that Pussy Willow has come?"

“I will call on her at once," said Honey Bee. Pussy was glad to see her old neighbor.

She filled his basket with nice beebread for his little ones.

The birds, who had been far away, heard Southwind's cheery song, “Winter has gone. Come home. Come. home.”

As soon as they came back, they began building their nests.

They always went to their day's work with singing. “This is a beautiful world," chirruped Bluebird.

- A. C. Scammell in American Primary Teacher"

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TALKING

The Wood-Allen Publishing Co. (Ann Arbor, Mich.,) send out a little booklet, “The Cigarette and the Youth," to assist in combating the evil of cigarette-smoking by children and youth. It is a bright, stirring little pamphlet, admirably adapted for its purpose. Single copy five cents.

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Read “The University School," in this number. No matter whether you believe in it or not, read all you find concerning it. It is an experiment worth watching. Dr. John Dewey of Chicago University, does not undertake

aimless work. No teacher can read the literature conEditor's Page

cerning the working of this school and not grow broader.

There is no mechanism, no grooves, and the complete March

absence of these alone ought to set a teacher to thinking. One can do a great deal this month in getting ready for spring in a very quiet way. It is a month to see the little The Esthetic Element in Nature Study indications of coming events with a hope in the voice and

Every teacher who knows the help and inspiration which a cheer in the manner. It is all well enough to have a little

Mr. Henry F. Bailey (State Supervisor of Drawing, Masslaugh occasionally over the blowiness of the month and to enter into the whirl of it once in a while « just for the fun of achusetts) gives to the artistic element in life, in whatever

phase he touches it, will hail with delight his return to the it.” But it hardly seems best to make too much of that feature of March; and above all, teachers, don't call it by Mr. Bailey opens in this number; and not only attrac

columns of PRIMARY EDUCATION. A most attractive series Nature's " house-cleaning" month. The world is prosaic vive but helpful and inspiring. The world is as we see it, and material enough at its best, and don't let us introduce

and Mr. Bailey looks with reverent eyes through rainbow the brush and broom “image" into the minds of our chil

lens at a world made fresh in springtime beauty. May he dren whenever March is mentioned. But it is the month

teach us how to see. when a thousand little live things underground are waking up and stretching out their tiny hands and feet just as little babies wake after a sleep. The children will understand

Music, Song, and Story” that and feel a sort of reverence for the very ground they The publisher of this new magazine might have added step on, since there is so much of life and movement

“Beauty" to its title with full claim for its appropriateness. beneath it. Who told all these little roots and seeds that it It combines among other attractions stories of a high order, was time to awake? Ah, there you touch the mystery of it poems, songs, fine illustrations and sixteen pages of lithoall - a mystery that will make tenderer the heart of every graphed music, vocal and piano, besides a song for children child, if it is brought before him in just the right way, and with music. Price ten cents a copy.

It is well worth sendat the right time. The timeliness of talking of these things ing for. S. W. Simpson, 70 Fith Ave., N. Y. City. is a great secret in giving and deepening impressions.

Beautiful Pictures
How Many are we Practising ?

Mrs. E. M. Perry (Malden, Mass.) furnishes pictures Frances Willard says: “I am grateful for the diet reform, (51 x 8 inches) of fine quality on good paper, for school for the dress reform, for the take-a-good-time-as-you-go use, at one cent each. Send stamps for catalogue and reform, for the out-doorsy reform and exercise for women samples. 150 subjects for every grade of schools. It is reform.” This list is an excellent prescription for teachers a rare opportunity to familiarize children with standard to help them through the “ trying " spring months of lassi- pictures. tude and examination fevers. Try it.

Send to Eaton & Co., Chicago for F. Lilian Taylor's First

Reader, 25 cents. (See notice in this issue.)
Do Yours?
A teacher visited a very poor school the other day, and

To Contributors while she found much to disappoint and disapprove she

The calendar for the coming year will be as follows: was able to say this one good, good thing about it: “ Her

Matter for Oct.

due children picked up their feet when they walked.” Do

Aug. 1 " Nov.

Sept. 1 yours?

« Dec.
Jan.

Nov. 1
The Speer Arithmetic

« Feb.

Dec. I, etc. For twelve months PRIMARY EDUCATION has given gen- Always remember that all contributions must be received erous place to the theory and practical illustration of TWO MONTHS BEFORE publication. what has come to be known as the “ Speer Arithmetic.” No other paper began as early or has done as much as this

New Books for Primary Teachers magazine in giving clear and full explanations of this system of teaching number. The series closed with the February by Jessie L. Gaynor. (The John Church Company, Cincinnati.)

“ Songs of the Child-World.” Words by Alice C. D. Riley. Music installment, and it is hoped that every teacher who has

“ Around the World.” First Book. By Stella W. Carroll and Clarence taken the paper since these articles began will keep them

F. Carroll. (T Morse Company, N. Y. City.) for future reference. The critics are aiming sharp arrows “Curious Homes and Their Tenants." By James Carter Beard. (D. at so bright a target as this popular method of “ ratio "

Appleton & Co., N. Y. City.) teaching, and time will prove whether or not it will Among the Meadow People." By Clara Dillingham Pierson. (E. “stand fire.” In the meantime hold fast to this series of P. Dutton & Co., N.Y. City.) articles written by two school principals, who wrote from daily “ Stepping Stones to Literature II, III.” By Sarah Louise Arnold and

Charles B. Gilbert. (Silver, Burdett & Co., Boston.) experience in this method and abundant opportunities to

"A New Book of the Fairies.” By Beatrice Harraden. (E. P. observe their own teachers at work and the results obtained

Dutton & Co., N. Y. City.) by the children. There has been no speculation about

“When Life is Young.” By Mary Mapes Dodge. (The Century Co., their work. But why not begin, teachers, at the very N. Y. City.) beginning, as outlined in clear detail in this paper (Jan.,

First Reader. Home and School Series. By F. Lilian Taylor. 1897) and test it for yourselves.

(Eaton & Co., Chicago.)

66

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had to go to his home away up among the icebergs and the snow, for the fairies were too much for him. And the last they saw of him he was sitting on the top of an iceberg, throwing kisses to them and shouting, “ I'll be back next winter! I'll be back next winter ! Then you will have to go home !"— Sel.

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upon them.

A Party The Merry War Between Jack

Primary Reading Frost and the Sunbeam Fairies

Jack Frost had a good-by party just before he went away.

It was a working party. Southwind, Sunbeam and CloudThe Sun said, one March morning, “ It is time Jack Frost

let were there. Many little fairies came too.

Jack said, “Let us help Mother Earth get ready for went home." Jack Frost heard, and answered: “The little boys and

spring! girls love me; I think I will stay all summer.

“We will wake our little brothers and sisters who have

I know they would like to have a sleighride on the Fourth of July."

slept all winter." And he was so pleased with the idea that he laughed out

They will be glad to help us." loud, and ran after some children that were on their way to

So Jack went to work with his ice plows, and broke up

the hard ground. school, and pinched their ears. And the children laughed

The noise awoke the pretty pink earthworms. and said, “Ho! ho ! I feel Jack Frost ! Let's run so fast he can't catch us !” So they ran all the way to school, and

They set to work carrying tiny loads of rich loam to the

surface. he did not have a chance to pinch them again.

The farmer saw this and said, “ It will soon be time for And again the sun said, “ It is time Jack Frost went home."

me to plow.” And Jack Frost began to feel very uncomfortable, for the

“Now we will unlock the little streamlets,” said Jack. Sun shone very bright and was very warm.

“ Dear me !"

The happy waters came dancing out. They were glad

to be free again. said he, “I am very uncomfortable. If I can't stop that Sun from shining, I am afraid I shall have to go home or

They sang, "Now we can make othes happy." melt. Something will have to be done about it."

“We will sing for the children.” And what do you think he did ? He went to his friends

“We will sing for Chip, and Bunny, and Little Wild

flower." the Snow Clouds, and said, “ Snow Clouds, I want to stay in New York all summer. I know the children miss me when

“We will make the mill wheels go." I go away. I don't believe they have a bit good time after I

“We will carry sands to the sea."
Sunbeam, Cloudlet and Southwind knew where

every

little am gone, with nothing but the great hot Sun pouring down

seed lay sleeping. They went together and lifted the

coverlets. You see, Jack Frost knew nothing about all the beautiful flowers, and the grass, and the leaves on the trees, and the

The sleepy seeds felt a gentle shake and a warm kiss. peaches and the pears and the peas and the beans we have They awoke good-natured and hungry.

Cloudlet gave them a morning bath. in summer, for just as soon as the sun began to shine more

Southwind and Sunbeam helped to get them a good warmly on the earth in the month of March, Jack Frost had

breakfast. to run away — away up north to his own home among the

Then the little seeds went to work. icebergs and snow. If you should show him a peach he would think perhaps it was just some dear little child's rosy

We will grow into the best flowers and fruits that we cheek, and give it a pinch and kiss it just for fun.

can," they said. Jack Frost loved the Snow Clouds, and the Snow Clouds

“We will grow to make others happy.” loved Jack Frost, and knew just what he wanted.

Southwind said to Honey Bee, “ Have you heard that

Pussy Willow has come?" right,” said the Snow Clouds; “we won't let the Sun shine

“ I will call on her at once," said Honey Bee. on the earth any more." And one fierce looking Snow Cloud said : “ Too bad none of the dear little children in

Pussy was glad to see her old neighbor.

She filled his basket with nice beebread for his little New York have ever seen an iceberg! Let us help make one out in the harbor for them.”

The birds, who had been far away, heard Southwind's And all the Snow Clouds were so pleased at the idea that

cheery song, “Winter has gone. Come home. Come they tumbled over each other and went whirling away toward

home." New York in such a hurry and a furry that they reached there before the Sun was up. And what do you think the

As soon as they came back, they began building their

nests. children saw when they woke up the next morning? Clouds of gray up in the sky, and snow everywhere. All day they

They always went to their day's work with singing.

“ This is a beautiful world,” chirruped Bluebird. watched the snow pile up over everything, on the roofs of

- A. C. Scammell in American Primary Teacher" the houses and on the window-sills, on the lamp-posts and on the telegraph wires, on the fences and on the pavements, and even on the tops of umbrellas that were walking down the street. And it snowed, and it snowed, and it snowed ;

“Come, Pussy' and Jack Frost laughed, and laughed, and laughed. “Ha,

Soon red will bud the maple trees, ha!” said he; “isn't this fun? Such a lot of snow will

The bluebirds will be singing, never melt!' And away he flew and nipped the horses'

And yellow tassels in the breeze ears to make them prance, and hear the sleigh-bells ring,

Be from the poplars swinging ; for that was the music: Jack Frost loved best. And the

And rosy will the Mayflower lie colder it grew the better he liked it, and the beautiful big

Upon its mossy pillow; sun smiled to see Jack Frost so happy.

“ But you must come the first of all, “But Jack Frost must go home," said the Sun. And

Come, Pussy!" is the south wind's call, — what do you think happened? What do you think the chil

“Come, Pussy! Pussy Willow! dren saw when they woke up the next morning? The

A fairy gift to children dear, beautiful big Sun 'way up in the sky, and all the warm March

The downy firstling of the year,-Sunbeam Fairies busy at work getting the world ready for

Come, Pussy! Pussy Willow ! ”

Sel. the birds and the flowers that were coming. And Jack Frost

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ENTERTAINMENT

7. Motion toward left, as if thrinking away from wind; shake head empha-ically; during interlude, position (1).

8. Rock very slowly throughont stanza; prolong e in “ stealing," to imitate wail of wind.

9. On “sigh," sigh long and deeply.

10. Shake heads slowly; at end of line dropping them to right, in sleepy manner, as if disturbed in sleep. During interlude, position (1).

11. Sing gail. ; rock rapidly to end of line.
12. Repeat (6); at " Wake," turn chairs to right.

13. Rub eyes with both hands sleepily; during interlude, position (1).

14. Sit up straight; lift right hand as if listening:
15. All face a little to left; smile.
16. Lift faces up toward left; smile.

17. Hold (16); open eyes; raise both hands above eyes as if shading them; hold throughout interlude.

18. Sing joyously, rising to feet; tie hoods.
19. Motion impressively to audience, with right forefinger.
20. Hold out both hands in greeting; look up; smile.

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The Awakening of the Pussy

Willows

ALICE E. ALLEN Music; “Silent Night! Holy Night!" (Franklin Square Song Collection, I.)

March

(2) Dreaming sweet, dreaming sweet,

Through the winter's snow and sleet,
Furry pussy willows, – see,-

Rocking, rocking on our tree,(3)

Happy dreams have we,
Happy dreams have we.

(4) Dashing down, dashing down, (5) Sweeps the North Wind with a frown; (6) And to wake us, roughly tries,

“ Pussies, come,” he rudely cries,(7)

“ Not for you,” say we.
“ Not for you,” say we.

I wonder what spendthrift chose to spill
Such bright gold under my window-sill?
Is it fairy gold? Does it glitter still?
Bless me! it is but a daffodil!
And look at the crocuses, keeping tryst
With the daffodil by the sunshine kissed!
Like beautiful bubbles of amethyst
They seem, blown out of the earth's snow mist.
And snowdrops, delicate fairy bells,
With a pale green tint like ocean swells;
And the hyacinths weaving their perfumed swells !
The ground is a rainbow of asphodels !
Who said that March was a scold and a shrew?
Who said she had nothing on earth to do
But tempests and furies and rages to brew?
Why, look at the wealth she has lavished on you!
Oh, March that blusters and March that blows,
What color under your footsteps glows!
Beauty you summon from winter snows,
And you are the pathway that leads to the rose.

- Celia Tharter

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Spring is 'Most Here Little folks, little folks, spring is 'most here; Soft winds are humming and bluebirds appear; Yesterday Red-breast stood winking at me, Pluming his wings in the old apple tree.

(14) Sweet and still, sweet and still, (15) Steals the South Wind o'er the hill,

Magic hands, we can't resist (16) Lift our faces to be kissed, (17)

“ Time to wake,” say we,
“ Time to wake,” say we.

Violets whisper low under their hoods,
Some in the meadows and some in the woods :
Peeping through leaves and dried grasses to-day,
Catching all sunbeams that happen that way.
Then hurry up, little folks, spring is 'most here;
Busy we must be at this time of year ;
Ground to get ready, seeds to put in ;
Who'll be the first one a blossom to win?

Mrs. M. 7. Smith

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The Wind I saw you toss the kites on high, And blow the birds about the sky, And all around I heard you pass Like ladies' skirts across the grass. O wind, a blowing all day long ! O wind, that sings so loud a song !

Motions Each child wears a hood of fur, or velvet edged with sur. This is left unfastened until last stanza. Little coats trimmed with fur and fur boas may be worn if desired. Color of fur should be soft gray or pale brown or white. Costumes may be made more elaborate if desired.

(Music throughout should imterpret words, and represent sound of wind. In each stanza, first and filth lines, when repeated, should be sung very softly.)

1. Children are seated in little willow rocking chairs, arranged in semi-circle on stage. Heads turned to lest leaning against back of chair tyes closed; hands folded in laps.

Entire stanza is sung slowly, softly, and in a sleepy manner.

2. Rock backward on “ Dreaming," forward on “ Sweet.” Continue, in perfect time, throughout stanza.

3. Smile; during interlude, position (1).

4. Music loud; both hands lifted upward to right; bring down vigor. ously toward left on “ down ”; repeat.

5. Hands in laps; shiver. 6. Sit up straight; eyes still closed; hand on each side of chair; at “ Wake "Turn chair quickly to left.

I saw the different things you did
But always you yourself you hid,
I felt you push, I heard you call,
I could not see yourself at all.
O wind a blowing all day long!
O wind, that sings so loud a song!

Robert L. Stevenson

Spring hangs her infant blossoms on the trees, Rocked in the cradle of the western breeze."

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