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AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INSTRUCTION.

THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING.

JOURNAL OF PROCEEDINGS.

PORTLAND, ME., August 16, 1864. THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INSTRUCTION commenced its Thirty-Fifth Annual Session at the City Hall in the city of Portland, Maine, August 16, 1864, at two and a half o'clock, P. M.

The meeting was called to order by the President, Charles Northend, Esq.

The Divine blessing was invoked by Rev. Dr. Shailer, of Portland.

His Honor, Jacob McLellen, Mayor of Portland, welcomed the Institute as follows:

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WELCOME TO THE INSTITUTE BY HIS HONOR, JACOB

MC LELLEN, MAYOR OF PORTLAND.

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN:

In behalf of our citizens, I will say that we are glad to see you here. Our public buildings will be free for your occupation and inspection while you remain in the city. Allow me the pleasure of introducing Nathan Webb, Esq.

ADDRESS OF NATHAN WEBB, ESQ., OF THE SUPERINTENDING

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.

OF TH

MR. PRESII NT, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN

AMERICAN INSTITUTE:

At a time like this, when the country is torn with civil strife, it is gratifying to find a large number of our intelligent fellow-citizens giving their attention to those matters which are supposed to be best adapted to the welfare and security of the State. It is an encouraging proof that we retain our faith in the permanency of our institutions. Your labors for the advancement of sound learning, and your efforts for the perfection of all the agencies and instrumentalities which can conduce to that advancement, can never fail to meet with sympathy and coöperation in a free government. The citizens of Portland, appreciating the value of this institution, and uniting with it in the desire to perfect all the means and methods of public instruction, thank the Directors of the Institute for appointing this meeting here this year; and they extend to all its members, and to the other friends of education who have assembled here to enjoy the opportunities of this occasion, a hearty welcome. To each and all they extend their welcome ; and will endeavor so to contribute to the success of the session, that it shall be in all minds a bright and pleasant memory. (Applause.)

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ADDRESS OF HON. E. P. WESTON, STATE SUPERINTENDENT

OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

MR. PRESIDENT, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN:

You have received a hearty welcome to the hospitalities of the city, and to its attractions, in the remarks offered by the mayor and his representative. It was suggested to me, a few moments ago, that not only should the city recognize this

association and extend its welcome, but that there would be a propriety also in an officer of the State seconding as it were the invitation, and extending the welcome of the State likewise. Holding a relation to those school interests in this State which this association has done so much to promote in all New England and the nation, I venture to respond to that suggestion; and I rise merely to second the welcome which has been already extended by the gentlemen who have preceded

me.

We are glad to meet this association for the fourth time in the State of Maine. The first time which the American Institute of Instruction assembled in this city, was twenty years ago this month. I had the pleasure of attending its meetings at that time, and I then became a member of the society. I was then in the early years of my teaching, and I remember with great pleasure the impulse given to my own mind then, by the discussions of those veteran teachers, Emerson, Thayer, Brooks, and others; and I remember with special pleasure the very interesting and important discussion which took place at that time between the Rev. Judson Whitman, then a pastor in this city, whose memory is precious even now, and the Rev. Charles Brooks; a discussion which resulted in some important conclusions in the minds of the members of the association at that time. The Institute has since met in the city of Bangor and in the city of Bath, and now again in Portland.

Ladies and gentlemen, we welcome you to the city and to the State; and we hope that as you look upon the various portions of our State, as you become acquainted with our people and our institutions, a favorable impression may be received by you with regard to Maine, which will induce you to desire to come again at some future time.

Ladies and gentlemen, we give you, as I said before, a cordial and hearty welcome, not only on behalf of the city, but of the State also, to this place on this occasion.

THE PRESIDENT'S RESPONSE.

MR. MAYOR, AND GENTLEMEN :

It becomes my pleasant duty to extend to you the sincere thanks of the members of the Institute for the very kind and cordial manner in which you have welcomed us to your city - your beautiful city — and to your State. We come here as friends of education. The superintendent of the schools of the State has alluded to the fact that we came to this city just twenty years ago. It was my pleasure, as it was that of many others who are here to-day, to be present at that time, to partake of your kind hospitalities, and to witness your interest in the cause of education. Many of those who were present with us at that time, some of them the most earnest and devoted of the friends of education, - among whom were the lamented Whitman and Page, - are now no more. But we come for the same cause; we receive from you

the same cordial welcome; and we hope that during our stay here we may each of us gather something of interest and instruction, which may make us more useful in our several spheres when we leave this place; and may we not hope that some impulse may be given to that cause which we all profess to love in this city and State, and that good may come out of this second visit of the American Institute of Instruction to this city?

On motion of D. B. Hagar, the reading of the records of the last annual meeting was omitted.

The president then delivered his annual address.

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