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proached within even a day's march, by the margin of the sea, which a the Beal fires blazed, first upon Tul- that place is as transparent as glass, loch-n'-Ard, and then upon the sum as the breeze steals up the inlet, at mits of all the crags and sqŭŭrs in that the head of which the monument was most singularly formed of lands; and situated,-the waves murmur among ere the invading party had gained the the pebbles as if singing their solenna only pass (and it was a long and diffi- requiem for the repose of the hero. cult one) by which the country could Over the little mound, with which be entered, that pass was brown with time has nearly encased the stone targets and beaming with clayınores; coffin, two weeping birches used to while along the summit of the moun- hang their fragrant festoons, while, to tains, on each side, files of men stood give every finish to the enjoyment of ready with levers to swing the masses at least one sense, the woodroof and of granite, of two or three tons weight, the wild hyacinth vied in perfume from their beds on the steep, and send with each other—the one, in its living thein booming into the ravine below scent, typical of the fame of the hero with a force against which no precau- when alive; the other, fragrant only tion of the wisest commander could when withered, as good a type of that have been of any avail. Alaster fame which cannot be made to perish. M'Cra, the father of our hero, (for But we must not allow ourselves to be he was a hero in his way,) was the seduced to linger at the grave of Diarfleetest foot that, within the range of mid; though, in sooth, if we wished tradition, had trodden the mountains for a mood of mind more touching of Kintail; and it was generally sup- than another, we know not whither posed that he was appointed collector we should go to find its equal. of the rents of the exiled M.Kenzie, It was conjectured that, in consewhich, when collected, were regularly quence of the service performed by carried abroad to their owner by a dar- old M-Cra, the son received his edaing freeman of the sea, whose name, as cation at the expense of the exiled Donhuil Spainiel, is still cherished by family. At any rate, no sooner bad the few remains of that gallant and un- Donald mastered the whole lore of conquerable people, who are now left to the parish, which lore was then a deplore that the mansion of their chief portion of one of the books of the New is a habitation for the gannet and the Testament and some of the leading osprey ; that the property has passed questions in the Assembly's Cateinto new hands; and that a new peo- chism, written in Gaelic (these fragple have brought a new industry, ments of theology were pasted upon which, though it has quadrupled the the staves of a cask, which the sea productions of the district, has driven had drifted'in), than he was remored the plough of ruin over every monu to the capital of the Highlands, and, ment and trace of those who so long after due residence there, sent to dwelt there. Barrow after barrow King's College, Aberdeen, from which was scattered, sometimes in quest of sober seminary the essential instructhe rude urns of the Northmen, but ters of the Highlanders have emanated more frequently that the clay of the ever since it had a foundation, or, at old inhabitants might fatten the fields least, since they had such instructers. of the new. Cairn after cairn was of the extent of Donald's acquiretaken down; one “ judgment circle” ments, whether at Inverness or at

removed after another; and, Aberdeen, there remains no evidence; though they spared it for a little time, the only event at all worthy of being the reputed, and, in the belief of the remembered, with which his name is natives, the indubitable grave of the coupled, was the celebrated slaughter mighty Diarmid himself yielded to the of Dauney, the janitor; who, after a passion for change. It was lone, and, mock trial, was led to the block, laid among monuments, was lovely. Fast upon it, and killed in an instant by a

was

gentle stroke of a wet towel across many can procure from the best furhis throat.

nished library. Nor was this study One thing is certain; the experience wholly unproductive of fruit. which the Minister had of the world proved by the history both of nations at these places, neither enlisted him and of individuals, that if there be in its pleasures nor allured him to its intellect which cannot come in the imitation ; for, though it was believed way of science and ordinary literature, in his native glen, that the power of it will spontaneously burst forth in the M-Kenzie (who had then just been poetry. The earliest mental producrestored, and had swung, as most of tions of all nations, of which any trace the chieftains swung, from the ac- remains, are poetical, and may in getiveness of rebellion to the passiveness neral be considered as songs ; poetry of worshipping royalty) was second is the first to be found and the first to only, if not, indeed, superior to that ripen in the revivals of literature ; and of the king himself, and could have whenever what is called a genius procured for Mr. M‘Cra the very springs up in pastoral countries, where foremost appointment in the island, he there are no marvels of art and mawas contented to return to his native chinery to attract the attention, it glen immediately when the period of invariably appears in poetry. With his study expired; nor did he again our hero the general principle was not leave it except to attend the meetings broken; and before he had settled of the Presbytery and Synod, and the twelve months in his native place, the latter he frequented as seldom as he lads on the hill and the lasses in the could. During his absence, too, he valley were carolling blithely the bad attended so closely to his books, strains of Donald M‘Cra. or, at least, had been so incurious in One step of renown leads to anoall the matters that he might have ther; and when mental improvement learned respecting the manners of is once in any way hegun, there is men, that he returned to the glen al- native impetus, which it requires very tered in nothing but in years and in- considerable resistance to stop. Acformation, the latter consisting of two cordingly, the elevation of Donald to portions-some half-acquired Latin, the dignity of poet to the glen was which he was gradually to forget, and soon followed by his elevation to the a great deal of mystical theology, more important office of schoolmaster; which was destined to increase at a and the love of song among the people greater ratio than the other diminished. was succeeded by a love for informa

What to do with the student fresh tion. Thus an arena was opened for from college in a place where nobody Donald to win laurels in the sight of could read English but the minister, all those who constituted the world to and he was scarcely in possession of his care or even to his knowledge ; a book, would have been a puzzle to and, from the state in which he found many; and in these times, when read- matters, the conquest was an easy ing constitutes so much of the business one. We have mentioned the extent and pleasure of all who can find lei- of the school books, at the time of his sure for it, it would have been difficult own initiatory instruction; and as his to imagine how the life of M'Cra aged predecessor had, for several could at all be borne. There is, years, lost his sight and nearly his however, a voice in every object in senses, the system had fallen off. nature; and in a romantic and lovely The boards were abandoned, and had land that voice is pleasant as well as become obliterated by the smoke loud. We are not sure but our reve- that filled the hovel which was callrend anchorite derived more exquisite ed the school-house ; so that the whole pleasure, with occasional glimpses of instruction the old schoolmaster gave, a finer philosophy, from the volume of consisted of small scraps on reliuncultivated nature around him, than gious subjects, neither very well put

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proached within even a day?s march: by the margin of the era the Beal fires blazed, first upon Tul that place is as transpare loch-n'-Ard, and then upon the sum

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course for him. Other than 're were no means of procedure fr. M'Cra; and accordingly, be

the terrors of winter set in, the roads, which were then bad the best seasons, had become altother impassable, he used to send off, pe the edification of the regents and udents at the college, the whole of the discourses in one parcel, the delivery of which was to bring him half a year nearer to the sacerdotal office; did the discourses thus sent, and which were bona fide his own produccions, gained him as much credit, and were perhaps as conclusive evidence of his progress in the sacred study, as

is he had been resident at the universi sity; while, probably, the simplicity

i of bis habits, and the little that there in was to distract his mind, were better If moral qualifications than if he had, at

ay the most precarious period of life, lat- been exposed to those temptations in lied society, against which it but too freac- quently happens that the study of di

his vinity is no certain or absolute pro79, by tection. that is With all these hopes and advantoward tages, however, there were still drawop twice backs : Mr. M‘Cra was completely and there excluded from what was called socie

text of ty; had no means whatever of knowing this ho- the world ; and, therefore, was forced be asked to limit his information to that system tent's own of divinity which he could form out of vably was, the two or three books he possessed, if-session's and from the conversation of those ons of the elders of the congregation who were

young men the depositaries alike of religious and *mselves for of traditionary lore. In consequence wise be ex- of this, he was a singular compound;

In extreme and if any man was ever in danger of -st in the case erring through excess of faith, Mr. her indulgence M‘Cra was that man. He believed

half-sessional all that had been told him by the d in the incle- Aberdonian professors; he believed r, during wh all that was found in the two or three in any district of clerical books he possessed ; if any the glen alluded other written matter, whether the rt of the country, History of Gulliver, or that of Jack ; so that the at- and the Giants, came by fragments in sed with, provided his way, he failed not implicitly to bend among his resi- lieve that; and from this universality of stitute who will read faith it was easy for bim to believe,

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together, nor very well adapted to the on first commencing his duty in the comprehension of his young auditors. chair of an university; and though Mr. M‘Cra, from the reputed influence there were few to see, and, with the he had with the chief of the clan, ea- exception of the minister, none who sily prevailed upon the interested to could appreciate the labors of the inerect a more commodious place for structer of Inverdonhuil, he toiled on, instruction. The school-house now cheered by the thought that he was rose with walls, formed alternately of doing good, and solaced with the idea turf and stone, with window holes that at some future period -bis present closed with turf in tempestuous wea- pupils would be able to appreciate the ther, but open when the days were value of his exertions, and by their good; and thus it was a palace com- gratitude compensate him for the appared with the former one, which, parent neglect in which those exerlike the more ancient houses of the tions were made. Nor was the fulHighlanders, was a trench having a filment of his hope extended to that bank thrown up on each side partially remote distance, as though he had covered with a roof, but with an open- been a teacher in a district already ing in the middle, for the admission educated, and had begun the directing of light and the escape of smoke, the studies of “ young gentlemen from which made it a matter of some diffi- the age of three to nine ;” for most of culty to find out a dry corner in those the pupils were rather advanced in storms of wind and rain by which that youth, some of them trenching on the part of the country is so frequently verge of manhood, and the majority visited.

of them sought the instructions of Mr. Mr. M'Cra had carried with him, M‘Cra of their own rolition, and as from Aberdeen, a few dozen copies having previously been captivated by of the «

Assembly's Catechism,” in the chaunting of his songs. Thus his English ; and these he elaborated into labor was an experiment on human school-books—by pasting the large nature which it is seldom in the powalphabets, at the beginning, upon the er of man to make. The understandformer boards, for the use of his ings of those with whom he had to younger scholars; and treasuring up deal had been more or less exercised the remainder, as initiatory books, for upon the occurrences around them, the more advanced, until they should the traditions of the glen, the oral be able to grapple with the Bible it- instructions of the catechist in reliself, the ultimate object of knowledge gious matters, and the annual examiin those days, of which he had pro- nation of the minister. Instead, vided himself with two copies. One therefore, of having, as is usually the of these, carefully fortified with a case, the labor of training those in the casing of goat-skin, he destined for external technicalities of learning, who the future use of the school. Nor are incapable of entering into the spiwere the materials of writing altoge- rit of what is taught, he had only to ther wanting : a neighboring mountain teach those who were already converfurnished argillaceous schistus or slate; sant with thinking, to clotbe their and by a good deal of labor with a ideas in a new language, and acquire stone and sand they were brought to a knowledge of those symbols, of the such a surface that rude lines and signification of which they were alfigures could be traced upon them ready informed. In consequence of with an angular fragment of stalactite. this, the progress that they made

Thus prepared for bis labor, and would, but for the knowledge of its having the esteem and the respect of causes, have been looked upon as litall the glen, Mr. M‘Cra opened his tle less than miraculous ; and, perhaps, session with probably as much heart- there never was a people who acquired felt pride, and as strong hopes of suc- the capacity of reading their own vercess, as ever were felt by a professor nacular tongue in so short a period as

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