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placed in a bin by themselves, and the small and imperfect ones kept for feeding to animals. They are sometimes assorted by using a wire-riddle, which allows the small ones to pass through it, while the large ones are retained. Those which have been planted especially for seed require particular care in assorting, which can be exercised only by an experienced person, who should be able to select those most suitable in size, the most symmetrical and perfect in form, well matured and solid. It cannot be determined with certainty whether a potato is solid throughout, yet an expert can generally come to a very correct conclusion.

In storing, each class should have its appropriate bin, easily accessi. ble without interfering with the others. The place should be moderately cool, and not liable to sudden and great changes of temperature. Hence, the cellar should be so constructed as never to make it necessary to resort, in the coldest weatber, to the artificial heat of a stove or other apparatus. The potato will endure a great deal of cold without injury, but a small excess of heat soon destroy's it. It will bear a temperature of two degrees below the freezing point for several days; but, if exposed below this, it soon freezes, and becomes unfit for food or seed. It is very unsafe to expose it below the freezing point; and, if possible, the cellar should be arranged in such a way that the lowest temperature may not exceed thirty-five degrees, nor the highest forty-five; otherwise, germi. nation may commence, which would have a very injurious effect upon the potato.

RECENT EXPERIMENTS. Dr. H. F. Hexamer, of New York, in a series of experiments, attained the follorsing results: 1. Of seventy bills of potatoes, pared so that no eyes were visible, thirty-five grew; soine produced very large potatoes, and most of the tubers planted remained hard and firm till time of dig. ging. 2. Of eighty hills planted with pieces cut without eyes, thirteen hills grew; all of which sprouted on the cut surface, none through the skin. 3. Of one hundred whole potatoes planted, ninety-eight grew from the small end, and one from the side. Of more than one-half the potatoes planted whole, only one eyo grew from each, the rest remaining dormant.

Dr. Hesamer gives the following list of varieties of the potato cultirated by him, the length of time each had been planted on the farm, the marketable product of each per acre, and its hardiness :

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Cuzco....
Monit r....
Pokeye Rustycoat..
White Peach Blow ...
Fiuke....
Peach Blow
Beterr..
Bulkley's Seedling..
Garnet Chili.
Buckeye.......
Early Goodrich
Prairie Seedling.
Colebrook ...
Early Cottage...
Bte Mercer..
Gicaron......
Jack White.
Jykeman...
Prince Albert.
White Rock....
Rough roi Ready
Enrly Sovereign
Early June.......

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A correspondent of the Working Farmer planted three rows of Davis Seedling potatoes side by side, and manured them in the hill alike : 1st, small whole potatoes ; 2d, large cut potatoes ; 3d, whole potatoes of medium size. The cut potatoes were of large size, and an entire potato, cut into equal parts, was put in each hill. They all produced potatoes of good size, but the row planted with cut tubers yielded about one-fifth more in quantity, and of rather larger size than either of the others.

At Old Westbury, New York, nine varieties of the potato were planted on soil prepared alike, and produced as follows: The Calico, 267 bushels; Harrison, 265; Gleason, 254; Early Rose, 235; Vanderveer, 227; Gard. ner, 215; Peach Blow, 197; Early Goodrich, 188; Early Samaritan, 96. The Early Goodrich and Early Samaritan were badly eaten by the potato bug, which accounts for their small yield. The Peach Blow and the Calico are declared to be of very good quality; the Early Rose, Early Goodrich, Early Samaritan, good; the Gleason, Vanderveer, and Gard. ner, medium. The Harrison is thought to be the best winter variety, and ripens two weeks earlier than the Peach Blow, The Early Rose is regarded as the best early variety, ripening two weeks before the Early Goodrich.

S. S. C. Moreland, of Pennsylvania, planted some large potatoes of the Cuzco variety, with the following results: Ten hills with one potato each, ten with two halves each, ten with one half each, ten with four quarters each, ten with two quarters each, ten with one quarter each. The hills were three and a half feet apart, and manured alike. When they were dug, the difference was so trifiling as not to be worth naming. The hills with two quarter pieces, however, did rather the best. By the side of these was planted a small piece with the same variety, in the old way, one foot apart, and the yield was more than twice as great as that from the others planted in hills.

A Pennsylvania correspondent of the Farm and Fireside planted seven hundred and eighty hills of potatoes, as follows: In the first row three pieces in a hill ; in the second row, four pieces; and so on through the field, the rows alternating with three and four pieces, respectively, in a hill. Each row was dug separately, and the product weighed. The result was, that three hundred and ninety hills with three pieces yielded 1,401 pounds; and the three hundred and ninety hills with four pieces yielded 1,570 pounds-a gain of one hundred and sixty-nine pounds, when four pieces were put in a hill. He also planted in a pile of mud, of uniform fertility, thirty-six hills with four pieces in a hill, which yielded 1253 pounds; and thirty-six hills with five pieces in a hill, with a product of 1363 pounds; a difference of eleven pounds in favor of the hills containing five pieces. From these experiments an argument is derived in favor of heavy seeding; but if there is too much seed the potatoes will be smaller.

A correspondent of the American Agriculturist planted five pounds of whole potatoes twelve inches apart, with a yield of eighteen pounds; in the next row, five pounds of halves six inches apart, with a yield of twenty pounds; while one and three-quarters pound of single-eye pieces produced ten pounds. There was no discoverable difference in the quality of the potatoes, and very little in size. Those of tho whole tubers were a trifle the largest. This makes it appear that, in the proportion of crop to seed, the advantage is largely in favor of single eyes; for in the same proportion the whole and the half potatoes should each have yielded 28.57 pounds, instead of eighteen pounds and twenty pounds, respectively, Having reference to the ground occupied, the result is in favor of the halves first, and the whole potatoes second. The balves yielded double, and the whole ones nearly double the yield of the single eyes on the same surface of ground. Although the quantity of seed and the ground planted with whole and with half potatoes were the same, the distance apart was double in the first mentioned,

J. N. Stearns, of Michigan, planted one pound of the Early Rose potato, comprising two large potatoes and a small one. He cut the two larger tubers through the middle, taking one half of each for the experi. ment. On cutting the eyes he had sixteen in each potato. He cat. through each eye of one of the potatoes, making thirty-two pieces, and put one-half an eye or one piece in each hill; and the sixteen eyes of the other potato were planted with one eye in a hill. From the thirty. two pieces, cut by dividing the sixteen eyes, he had 452 pounds; from the sixteen pieces planted with an eye in each, 194 pounds; from the small potato planted with a single eye in each piece, he had 173 poundsmaking in all 824 pounds, or nearly one and a half bushel from one pound of potatoes.

W. H. Crane, of Minnesota, planted four pounds each of the Early Goodrich, the Harrison, the Gleason, and the Cuzco potato, cutting them into pieces with a single eye, and planting in drills three and a half feet apart, putting one piece at every eighteen inches in the drill, with the following results: From the Early Goodrich be harvested 164 bushels; the Harrison, 221 bushels; the Gleason, 93 bushels; the Cuzco, 271 bushels; making 76 bushels from sixteen pounds of seed. From nineteen eyes of the Harrison he raised two bushels of potatoes, producing at the rate of eight hundred and ninety-three bushels to the acre.

William Goodrich, jr., of New York, planted in drills three feet apart, and sets nine inches apart in the drills, one barrel each of the Cuzco, the Orono, and the Harrison potato, cut into pieces containing two eyes. Each variety yielded about twenty barrels, being at the rate of about one hundred barrels to an acre. The Cuzco yielded a few less than the Orono, and the Harrison a few more. The Orono was a little the earliest, the smoothest, and best table potato, and also the best market variety. Mr. Goodrich thinks he should have had more potatoes from the same seed had they been planted fifteen inches in the drill instead of nine inches, but not so many per acre. They were all free from disease.

A correspondent of the Cultivator and County Gentleman states that his Harrison potatoes turned out two hundred bushels to an acre; Gleasons, three hundred bushels; and that his Cuzcos outstripped all others. He estimated the yield at five hundred bushels per acre.

Joseph L. Orr, of Massachusetts, raised from four pounds of the Early Goodrich potato three hundred and seventy pounds, or over ninety-two pounds from one pound. The ground on which they grew contained 1,035 feet, including a margin of eighteen inches. They were plauted the 25th of May; stocks blighted the middle of August; dug the middle of October.

John Danforth, of Connecticut, planted twenty pieces of the Early Goodrich potato in his garden, making twenty hills, manuring them with hog manure. The product, dug on the 17th of August, was three bushels and one peck of the finest potatoes he ever saw, weighing ninety ponnds.

E. A. Fassett, of Pennsylvania, planted sixteen potatoes of the Early Rose variety, weighing three pounds in all. They were cut in pieces containing a single eye, and planted with one piece in a hill, three feet apart each way. They made about two hundred hills, from which were dug fourteen and a half bushels, or at the rate of two hundred and

ninety ponuds from one pound. Four of the best hills filled a hall bụshel, and the largest potato weighed two and three-quarters poruds. As to quality, from the limited trial made, he thinks that they are nearly or quite first-rate when mature, but poor and watery when young, and growing rapidly.

Tbomas M. Harvey, superintendent of the Last Pennsylvania Experiinental Farm, reports the following results of a series of experiments:

No. 1.-Tho varieties of the potato planted were of different sizes, cut so as to make the number of pieces in a row, as given in the table. Phosphate, SOO pounds to an acre, applied in tho rowe.

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No. 2.-Bone phosphate, 1,000 pounds spread on the first acre; planted the 5th of May, in rows three feet apart, one potato or piece in a hill.

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Whole tubers, largo......
Cut, quartered lengthwise, large...
Halved, then crossed, large, sced end in this row
Sanne cut, large, stem end in this row
Whole tubers, medium size...
Cut, halved lengthwise, modium size..
Small whole tubers....

EARLY GOODRICH.

(Planted the 9th of May.)
Whole tubers, large.........
Cut, quartered lengthwisc, large.....
Cat, halved, then cut across, large, seed end in this row....
Cut same as preceding, stem end in this row....
Whole tubers, merljum.......
Cut, halved lengthwise, modium...

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No. 3.–Stable manure, fourteen loads spread on the second acre; same kind and form of seed as on the preceding phosphate; planted 11th of May, in rows three feet apart, one potato or piece in a hill.

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