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Mr. Henry moved that the Senate take a recess until 2:00 o'clock p. m.
The motion prevailed.

The Senate reconvened at the expiration of the recess and was called to order by the President.

A quorum of the Senate was present.

President's Address.

The President addressed the Senate as follows:

"Senators:--The outstanding feature of Michigan's government today is the success which has been attained by the State Administrative Board in reorganizing the government to bring about better efficiency, better co-ordination and better service for the people. This new deal in State affairs established by the last Legislature has been, to my mind, one of the most progressive steps in the history of the State. Governmental agencies in the State today are so extensive that careful attention to details to watch for the proper expenditure of the people's money is a prime requisite if the burden of taxation is not to be increased. Indeed, the question as to how the money is to be raised is a most serious one for us to consider.

“Agriculture is in a condition where every dollar of land taxes is but added discouragement to the farmer. There must be every care exercised to see that all classes of property bear their proportion of the tax levy.

"I was told the other day that there are 15,000 bill boards in Michigan which yield their owners a net annual profit of 72 dollars for every full space. No tax is collected by the State on this particular form of property.

"While economy should be the watch word, yet we know that our governmental agencies should be carefully guarded so as not to destroy the effectiveness which it has taken years to build up for the protection of the people.

"The dangers of succeeding administrations going from one extreme to the other should be avoided. A substantial form of sane, efficient and economical government is what the people want.

"I congratulate the Governor, commissions, departments and other agencies of the State as a whole for their effective administration of Michigan's affairs. We all grant mistakes have been made, and all is not perfect, yet comparing Michigan's government with that of other states in the nation, I firmly believe the people have every reason to be extremely proud of their own state.

“I know every effort has been made to bring to the State a real business administration and the proper administration of its governmental affairs. I hope the people will appreciate the importance of giving credit where credit is due. A high type of government cannot be established unless the public can discriminate between the need of criticism and commendation.

"Unlike business organizations, the State's administration is subject to changes and if good men are to be obtained for governmental service they must be given appreciation along with criticism. We strive earnestly for better government. In this work, officers and employes of the State are but servants of the people and the men who meet the difficulties and problems which arise are entitled to consideration by those whom they serve.

"Watching, as I have, the functions of the State during my service as Lieutenant Governor, I cannot but feel that it is time those who have been willing to criticize should also look for occasion to commend, to encourage officers to better service and tend to advance the work in which they are engaged.

“Michigan's presidential primary did not succeed in conveying the will of the people of the State to the last National Convention. I do not say this in any criticism of the nomination made, but to point out that the primary should be made to govern the Michigan delegation in at least as far as the second choice. The law should be strengthened to interpret the real will of the people or repealed.

"The Legislature, convinced that any federal law which compelled or might compel the shippers and travelers by steam railroads to pay rates substantially and unreasonably in excess of what was necessary to pay operating expenses, maintenances and repairs, taxes, depreciation and a fair return upon the value of the property of the carrier performing the particular services was unjust in principle, and vicious in operation, twice unanimously by resolution asked for a modification or repeal of the Transportation Act of 1920. The Act was passed for the purpose of guaranteeing the financial stability of the steam railroads. No action has been taken and transportation by steam railroads has become more expensive than ever.

“The results of the recent election clearly show that the public realizes the injustice of a scheme under which owners of railroad securities are guaranteed their profits and interests without any assurance that the railroads will render satisfactory service. The public has announced plainly that it will not tolerate the present system under which control of railroad rates is taken completely out of the hands of the State.

"The State has authorized by popular vote the issuance of $50,000,000 in bonds for the aid of its highways-approximately $25,000,000 has been spent in the construction of the highways of the State. No adequate provision has been made for their repairs, maintenance and upkeep. They have been adopted by those engaged in commercial transportation, by motor bus and truck in competition with the steam and electric carriers of the State in the short haul, freight and passenger business, and while the steam and electric carriers are compelled to maintain their road bed, the State, by public taxation, maintains the road bed used by their competitors. It is important to give consideration to the general problem of transportation. Proper maintenance and repairs of the public highways should be provided for, and such regulations made as to the use of such highways for commercial purposes as shall be consistent with the best interests of all.

“I urge upon you the importance of close attention to your Legislative duties that the important matters here considered may have the benefit of your full understanding of every phase, that the work of the Session be worthy of the State and its conclusion reached as early as possible.”

Appointment by the President.

The President announced the following appointment:
Messenger--Donald Boyce.

Appointments by the Secretary.

The Secretary of the Senate, pursuant to the requirements of Senate rule No. 10 and Senate resolution No. 9, announced the following appointments:

First Assistant Secretary-F. Irvin Chase.
Second Assistant Secretary-Guy W. Slack.
Proof Reader-Pauline P. Mosier.
Financial Clerk-William F. Clark.
Clerk-Maud English.

Standing Committees.

The President announced the appointment of the Standing Committees of the Senate, as follows:

Agriculture--Senators Leland, Horton, Karcher, Gettel and William L. Case.

Apportionment-Senators Atwood, Sligh, Wood, Bohn, Hayes, Whiteley, Leland, Karcher and Glaspie.

Banks and Corporations-Senators Hayes, Brower, Hunter, Sligh, Whiteley, Wilcox and Smith,

Cities and Villages-Senators Bahorski, Truettner, Sligh, Henry and Bernie L. Case.

College of Mines-Senators Wilcox, Gettel and Young.

Conservation-Senators Osborn, Penney, Pearson, Smith, Gettel, Glaspie and Bernie L. Case,

Counties and Townships-Senators Bernie L. Case, Horton and Riopelle. Drainage-Senators Gettel, Ross, Horton, Connelly and Bernie L. Case. Education Senators Ross, Condon, Smith, Eldred and Bohn. Elections-Senators Smith, Wood, Connelly, Gansser and Glaspie. Executive Business-Senators Truettner, Osborn, Connelly, Condon and Young. Finance and Appropriations-Senators Brower, Word Rnes, Truettner, Atwood, Sligh and Whiteley.

Highways-Senators Connelly, Osborn, Penney, Atwood, Pearson, Bohn and Gettel.

Industrial Schools-Senators Karcher, Wood and Bahorski.
Institutions for the Blind and Deaf-Senators Young, Johnson and Pearson.

Insurance-Senators MacNaughton, Whiteley, Condon, Hayes, Brower, Eldred and Sligh.

Judiciary–Senators Condon, Riopelle, Eldred, Hunter, Osborn, Bahorski and Penney.

Labor-Senators Wood, MacNaughton, Wilcox, Young and William L. Case.
Michigan Agricultural College-Senators Horton, Ross and MacNaughton.
Military Affairs-Senators Gansser, Glaspie, Johnson, Pearson and Smith.
Normal Schools–Senators Leland, Gansser and Connelly.
Penal Institutions.-Senators Riopelle, Gansser and William L. Case.
Printing-Senators Johnson, Glaspie and Penney.

Prohibition-Senators William L. Case, Ross, Leland, Bahorski and MacNaughton.

Public Health--Senators Bohn, Karcher, William L. Case, Hayes and Henry.
Railroads-Senators Hunter, Wilcox, Brower, Smith and Hayes.
Rules--Senators Whiteley, Atwood and Hunter.

State Affairs-Senators Eldred, MacNaughton, Hunter, Wilcox, Hayes, Bohn and Young.

State Hospitals-Senators Glaspie, Osborn, Johnson, Bahorski and Bernie L. Case.

State Homes-Senators Sligh, Henry and Truettner.
Supplies and Expenses-Senators Pearson, Johnson and Eldred.

Taxation---Senators Henry, Horton, Wood, Johnson, Leland, Riopelle and Truettner.

University-Senators Penney, Bohn and Condon.

Messages From The House.

A message was received from the House of Representatives informing the Senate that the House had concurred in the adoption of

Senate concurrent resolution No. 1.

A concurrent resolution providing for the appointment of postmaster of the Legislature.

The concurrent resolution was referred to the Secretary for record.

A message was received from the House of Representatives informing the Sen. ate that the House had concurred in the adoption of

Senate concurrent resolution No. 2.

A concurrent resolution prescribing the Joint Rules of the Senate and House of Representatives.

The concurrent resolution was referred to the Secretary for record.

A message was received from the House of Representatives informing the Senate that the House had concurred in the adoption of

Senate concurrent resolution No. 3.

A concurrent resolution prescribing the Joint Convention rules for the Legislature.

The concurrent resolution was referred to the Secretary for record.

A message was received from the House of Representatives transmitting
House Concurrent Resolution No. 1.
Providing for the appointment of an assistant postmaster.

Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That Ira G Ormsbee be and is hereby elected Assistant Postmaster for the session of 1923.

The message informed the Senate that the House of Representatives had adopted the concurrent resolution; in which action the concurrence of the Senate was requested.

Pending the order that, under rule 59, the concurrent resolution lie over one day,

Mr. Wood moved that rule 59 be suspended.
The motion prevailed.
The concurrent resolution was then considered and adopted.

Introduction of Bills.
Mr. Wood introduced
Senate bill No. 1, entitled

A bill to amend section 1 of Act No. 204 of the Public Acts of 1893, entitled "An act to create a board of jury commissioners, consisting of seven persons, for courts of record in the county of Wayne, and to repeal Act No. 95 of the Public Acts of 1887, as amended by Act No. 42 of the Public Acts of 1891, and all other acts and parts of acts contravening the provisions of this act,” as last amended by Act No. 269 of the Public Acts of 1907.

The bill was read a first and second time by its title, ordered printed, and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

Mr. Sligh introduced
Senate bill No. 2, entitled

A bill to amend sections 4, 4-a, 4-b and 5 of Act No. 85 of the Public Acts of 1921, entitled "An act prescribing the fees, taxes and charges to be paid to the State by corporations doing or seeking to do business in this State; prescribing the method and basis of computing such fees, taxes and charges; requiring certain annual reports to be filed by corporations; providing for the disposition of the moneys received under this act and prescribing penalties for non-compliance with the provisions thereof," approved April 27, 1921.

The bill was read a first and second time by its title, ordered printed, and referred to the Committee on Taxation.

By unanimous consent the Senate returned to the order of

Messages from the House.

A message was received from the House of Representatives, informing the Senate that the House had completed its organization by the election of George W. Welsh, Speaker, Thomas D. Meggison, Speaker pro tem, Charles S. Pierce, Clerk, and Clarence D. Birkholm, Sergeant-at-Arms, and is ready to proceed to business.

A further message was received from the House of Representatives, informing the Senate that the House of Representatives had appointed Representatives Town, Manwaring and Barnard as a committee to join a committee on the part of the Senate to wait on the Governor and inform him that the two houses have completed their organizations and are ready to receive any communication he may desire to make.

The Sergeant-at-Arms announced a committee of the Senate appointed to wait on the Governor and inform him that the Senate was duly organized, and said committee through its chairman, Senator Condon, reported that they had performed the duty assigned them, and that the Governor would communicate with the Legislature in joint session tomorrow at 1 o'clock p. m.

The report was accepted and the committee discharged.

A message was received from the House of Representatives informing the Senate that the House had adopted the following resolution:

House Concurrent Resolution No. 2.

Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That the Senate and House of Representatives meet in joint convention in the Hall of the House of Representatives January 4, 1923, at 1 o'clock p. m., to receive the message of Governor Alexander J. Groesbeck and such other communication as the Governor may desire to make to the Legislature.

Pending the order that under Rule 59 the concurrent resolution lie over one day.

Mr. Henry moved that Rule 59 be suspended.
The motion prevailed.
The concurrent resolution was then considered and adopted.

Motions and Resolutions.

Mr. Henry moved that when the Senate adjourns today it stand adjourned until Thursday, January 4, 1923, at 12:45 o'clock p. m.

The motion prevailed.
Mr. Smith moved that the Senate adjourn.
The motion prevailed, the time being 4:50 o'clock p. m.

Accordingly, and in pursuance of the order previously made, the President declared the Senate adjourned until Thursday, January 4, 1923, at 12:45 o'clock P. m.

DENNIS E. ALWARD,

Secretary of the Senate.

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