North and South

Portada
Cosimo, Inc., 2008 M01 1 - 484 páginas
It was curious how the presence of Mr. Thornton had power over Mr. Hale to make him unlock the secret thoughts which he kept shut up even from Margaret. Whether it was that her sympathy would be so keen, and show itself in so lively a manner, that he was afraid of the reaction upon himself, or whether it was that to his speculative mind all kinds of doubts presented themselves at such a time, pleading and crying aloud to be resolved into certainties, and that he knew she would have shrunk from the expression of any such doubts-nay, from him himself as capable of conceiving them-whatever was the reason, he could unburden himself better to Mr. Thornton than to her of all the thoughts and fancies and fears that had been frost-bound in his brain till now.-from Chapter XXXV: "Expiation"As interest in 19th-century English literature by women has been reinvigorated by a resurgence in popularity of the works of Jane Austen, readers are rediscovering a writer whose fiction, once widely beloved, fell by the wayside. British novelist ELIZABETH CLEGHORN GASKELL (1810-1865)-whose books were sometimes initially credited to, simply, "Mrs. Gaskell"-is now recognized as having created some of the most complex and broadminded depictions of women in the literature of the age, and is today justly celebrated for her precocious use of the regional dialect and slang of England's industrial North.North and South-Gaskell's fourth novel, which was originally serialized in 1854 and 1855 in the periodical Household Words, edited by Gaskell's friend Charles Dickens-draws on Gaskell's own life as the wife of a progressive preacher in Manchester for its tale of the tumultuous romance between a minister's daughter and a wealthy mill owner. The plight of the poor as well as the class divisions of the era come to the fore here, and helped establish the author's reputation as a champion of the working class. Adapted as an acclaimed 2004 BBC miniseries, this is perhaps Gaskell's most beloved work.Friend and literary companion to such figures as Charlotte Bront -of whom Gaskell wrote an applauded 1857 biography-Gaskell is today being restored to her rightful place alongside her. This delightful new edition is an excellent opportunity for 21st-century fans of British literature to embrace one of its most unjustly forgotten authors.

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - VeritysVeranda - LibraryThing

Four stars for a work of fiction that is set in a world which can still resonate with the events in the world today, characters who have meaningful conversations/arguements and the lovers have a happy ... Leer comentario completo

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - Annesanse - LibraryThing

I read this book mainly because I found and LOVED the mini series based on it on Netflix. I have to say that this is one of those rare exceptions where I like the movie more than the book. While the ... Leer comentario completo

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Sección 1
15
Sección 2
23
Sección 3
43
Sección 4
55
Sección 5
61
Sección 6
69
Sección 7
91
Sección 8
105
Sección 21
285
Sección 22
291
Sección 23
297
Sección 24
341
Sección 25
355
Sección 26
365
Sección 27
379
Sección 28
391

Sección 9
113
Sección 10
119
Sección 11
143
Sección 12
151
Sección 13
159
Sección 14
171
Sección 15
203
Sección 16
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Sección 17
227
Sección 18
233
Sección 19
239
Sección 20
263
Sección 29
403
Sección 30
413
Sección 31
423
Sección 32
427
Sección 33
451
Sección 34
457
Sección 35
463
Sección 36
473
Sección 37
481
Sección 38
485
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Acerca del autor (2008)

Elizabeth Gaskell was born on September 29, 1810 to a Unitarian clergyman, who was also a civil servant and journalist. Her mother died when she was young, and she was brought up by her aunt in Knutsford, a small village that was the prototype for Cranford, Hollingford and the setting for numerous other short stories. In 1832, she married William Gaskell, a Unitarian clergyman in Manchester. She participated in his ministry and collaborated with him to write the poem Sketches among the Poor in 1837. Our Society at Cranford was the first two chapters of Cranford and it appeared in Dickens' Household Words in 1851. Dickens liked it so much that he pressed Gaskell for more episodes, and she produced eight more of them between 1852 and 1853. She also wrote My Lady Ludlow and Lois the Witch, a novella that concerns the Salem witch trials. Wives and Daughters ran in Cornhill from August 1864 to January 1866. The final installment was never written but the ending was known and the novel exists now virtually complete. The story centers on a series of relationships between family groups in Hollingford. Most critics agree that her greatest achievement is the short novel Cousin Phillis. Gaskell was also followed by controversy. In 1853, she offended many readers with Ruth, which explored seduction and illegitimacy that led the "fallen woman" into ostracism and inevitable prostitution. The novel presents the social conduct in a small community when tolerance and morality clash. Critics praised the novel's moral lessons but Gaskell's own congregation burned the book and it was banned in many libraries. In 1857, The Life of Charlotte Brontë was published. The biography was initially praised but angry protests came from some of the people it dealt with. Gaskell was against any biographical notice of her being written during her lifetime. After her death on November 12, 1865, her family refused to make family letters or biographical data available.

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