The life and writings of Philip, late duke of Wharton ..., Volumen2

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Printed, and sold by the booksellers of London and Westminster, 1732
 

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Página 615 - He was haughty beyond expression, abject to those he saw he must stoop to, but imperious to all others. He had a violence of passion that carried him often to fits like madness, in which he had no temper. If he took a thing wrong, it was a vain thing to study to convince him: that would rather provoke him to swear, he would never be of another mind: he was to be let alone: and perhaps he would have forgot what he had said, and come about of his own accord. He was the coldest friend and the violentest...
Página 613 - ... much as to the appearances of it ; and was an implacable enemy : but he had a peculiar way to make his friends depend on him, and to believe he was true to them. He was a positive and undertaking man : so he gave the king great ease, by assuring him all things would go according to his mind in the next session of parliament. And when his hopes failed him, he had always some excuse ready to put the miscarriage upon. And by this means he got into the highest degree of confidence with the king,...
Página 670 - Bromley the i zth of y^r// very ill of the Gout, and that no Stranger could come to him from the Time he went to Bromley 'till after his Wife's Death ; that one or other of the Servants always...
Página 615 - He made a very ill appearance : he was very big : his hair red, hanging oddly about him : his tongue was too big for his mouth, which made him bedew all that he talked to : and his whole manner was rough and boisterous, and very unfit for a court.
Página 685 - Finch, in .the Cafe of the Earl of Clarendon.- " ' We have an Accufation upon « Hearfay, and if it is not made good, the blacked Scandal ' Hell can invent, lies at our Doors.
Página 616 - And he knew how to apply himself to them so dextrously, that, tho' by his changing sides so often it was very visible how little he was to be depended on, yet he was to the last much trusted by all the discontented party.
Página 616 - He had a particular talent to make others trust to his judgment, and depend on it: And he brought over so many to a submission to his opinion, that I never knew any man equal to him in the art of governing parties, and of making himself the head of them.
Página 646 - Gentlemen, who are in the Hands of the Government, are under Hopes and Fears ; and therefore it is certain, when they fpeak a Language, which perhaps miy be.
Página 562 - ... desire. Now the cause of this is principally the avarice and ambition of the chief citizens. For either, by injuring their inferiors, they compel them to fly out of the city ; or in such things wherein they differ from one another, disdaining to be worsted by their fellow-citizens, they bring in such as are more powerful, whence both the council, people, courts of judicature, and whole magistracy lose their authority. But he ought to appease private citizens by equality, and mightier men by mutual...
Página 613 - He gave himself great liberties in discourse, and did not seem to have any regard to truth, or so much as to the appearances of it ; and was an implacable enemy : but he had a peculiar way to make his friends depend on him, and to believe he was true to them. He was a positive, and undertaking man : so he gave the King great ease, by assuring him all things would go according to his mind in the next session of parliament. And when his hopes failed him, he had always some excuse ready to put the miscarriage...

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