Queensland Agricultural Journal, Volúmenes1-20

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Government Printer, South Africa, 1908
 

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Página 40 - From half the sum of the three sides subtract each side separately. Multiply the half sum and the three remainders together, and extract the square root of the product.
Página 192 - ... all, for the destruction of the forests means the loss ? of the waters as surely as night follows day. With the rise in the cost of producing food, the cost of food itself will rise. Commerce in general will necessarily be affected by the difficulties of the primary industries upon which it depends. In a word, when the forests fail, the daily life of the average citizen will inevitably feel the pinch on every side.
Página 192 - ... industry in the United States. All forms of building industries will suffer with it, and the occupants of houses, offices, and stores must pay the added cost. Mining will become vastly more expensive; and with the rise in the cost of mining there must follow a corresponding rise in the price of coal, iron, and other minerals. The railways, which have as yet failed entirely to develop a satisfactory substitute for the wooden tie (and must, in the opinion of their best engineers, continue to fail),...
Página 194 - ... productive and unproductive, represents a capital of $50, paying 5 per cent, interest, and this constantly improving. It must not be overlooked that these results have come largely from non-agricultural lands, the sandy plains, the swamps, the rough mountain slopes, and from forests which in part, at least, were mismanaged like ours. Can we expect to attain the same or similar results? We ought to do much better, for we have the hundred years of experience of our friends across the water to draw...
Página 192 - ... opinion of their best engineers, continue to fail), will be profoundly affected, and the cost of transportation will suffer a corresponding increase. Water power for lighting, manufacturing and transportation, and the movement of freight and passengers by inland waterways, will be affected still more directly than the steam railways. The cultivation of the soil, with or without irrigation, will be hampered by the increased cost of agricultural tools, fencing and the wood needed for other purposes...
Página 195 - ... we begin to make provision for the future supply. The present indications are that in spite of the best we can do there will be a shortage of hardwoods running through at least fifteen years. How acute that shortage may become and how serious a check it will put upon the industries concerned can not now be foretold. That it will strike at the very foundation of some of the country's most important industries is unquestionable. This much is true beyond doubt, that we are dangerously near a hardwood...
Página 192 - What will happen when the forests fail ? In the first place, the business of lumbering will disappear. It is now the fourth greatest industry in the United States. All forms of building industries will suffer with it, and the occupants of houses, offices, and stores must pay the added cost. Mining will become vastly more expensive ; and with the rise in the cost of mining there must follow a corresponding rise in the price of coal, iron, and other minerals. The railways, which have as yet failed...
Página 194 - ... increased in less known and less abundant woods. Maple increased 39.4 per cent. and rose to second place in the list. Red gum gained 59 per cent. and advanced from seventh to fourth place. Chestnut and birch have increased tremendously, and beech and tupelo have been prominently introduced. Third, although almost all possible new woods have been brought into use there has been a shrinkage in the total output of 15.3 per cent. CONDITION AS SHOWN BY STATES. An examination of the figures for certain...
Página 192 - Estimates of this kind are almost inevitably misleading. For example, it is certain that the rate of consumption of timber will increase enormously in the future, as it has in the past, so long as supplies remain to draw upon. Exact knowledge of many other factors is needed before closely accurate results can be obtained. The figures cited are, however, sufficiently reliable to make it certain that the United States has already crossed the verge of a timber famine...
Página 194 - The hardwood lumber cut in 1899, according to the census," was 8,634,021 thousand feet; in 1906 it had fallen to 7,315,491 thousand feet, a decrease of 15.3 per cent. This decrease took place during a period when American industries sprang forward at a pace unparalleled ; when there was the strongest demand ever known for every class of structural material ; when the output of pig iron increased 15 per cent., that of cement 132.17 per cent., and even that of softwood timber 15.6 per cent. That the...

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