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SAND CRUCIBLES.

[Paragraph 94.) THE AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY, NEWARK, N. J., ASKS

THAT THESE ARTICLES BE ADMITTED FREE.

NEWARK, N. J., January 11, 1909. WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. GENTLEMEN: Attached please find letters from concerns in all parts of the country who purchase Hessian sand crucibles from us.

There are three handlers of these crucibles in the United States, and we believe, all told, there are from 15 to 20 carloads per annum which come in here.

Sand crucibles under the present tariff carry a duty of 25 per cent, and we recommend for your consideration the removal of all duty on Hessian sand crucibles.

These crucibles are made of sand that is found a few miles from Castle, Germany, at a place called Grossalmerode, and also at another town called Epterode, and sand of a similar quality that will stand the heat and flux required has never been found anywhere else in the world, with the result that no English or American made crucibles can be used for the purposes required.

It seems to us as dealers that the American consumer should have the benefit of this, as if the duty is removed it will in no way increase or decrease the sale of American-made crucibles of any kind.

Our main object in calling attention to this is that if we can save our customers this 25 per cent we wish to do so, and would recommend, if you see fit to remove the duty, that you particularly specify Hessian sand crucibles only, as other crucibles, such as English and French, are imported, but crucibles for similar purposes to those are made in this country, and we believe in protection to American industries.

The attached letters are from the following concerns, and we hope you will give this matter very careful attention: Goldsmith Brothers Smelting and Refining Company, Chicago, Ill. W. E. Mowrey, St. Paul, Minn. G. W. Seifried, Cincinnati, Ohio. Kunz & Rogers, Detroit, Mich. Andrew 0. Kiefer, Newark, N. J. W. T. Robertson Company, Newark, N. J. Henry Nelms & Son, Philadelphia, Pa. Hastings & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. Day, Clark & Co., Newark, N. J. Paul H. Rosenthal, Philadelphia, Pa. Wadsworth Watch Case Company, Dayton, Ky. Phillips & Jacobs, Philadelphia, Pa. King & Eisele, Buffalo, N. Y. Yours, respectfully, AMERICAN OIL & SUPPLY Co.,

C. R. BURNETT.

1045

CHICAGO, December 5, 1908. AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY,

Newark, N. J. GENTLEMEN: We are in receipt of your favor of the 1st instant. The only sand crucible made in this country is the one made by the Denver Fire Clay Company, of Denver, Colo., and this is in no way whatever suitable for the use of a smelter. The small Battesea crucibles made by them for assaying purposes are fairly good. As there is no such crucible made in this country as the Hessian sand crucible, and nothing similar to them that could take their place, there certainly should be no duty on them. Yours, truly,

GOLDSMITH BROS. SMELTING & REFINING Co., Per L. ADELSDORF.

St. Paul, Minn., December 4, 1908. AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY,

Newark, N.J. DEAR SIRS: Yours in regard to the duty on Hessian sand crucibles to hand. I am glad you are going to take the matter up and hope you will succeed in having the duty of 25 per cent taken off entirely. I consider such a duty as unwarranted and entirely unjustified, as no material for such crucibles is obtainable in this country and no sand crucibles are made here, and for some refining purposes no other kind are practicable. Clay and graphite crucibles, as you know, are too readily attacked by some fluxes we have to use to make their use possible. As a large user of crucibles, I am very much interested in this matter, and hope in the revision of the tariff schedules we may have our side (the consumers') get the relief we should have in this matter. Yours, very truly,

W. E. MOWREY.

CINCINNATI, December 4, 1908. AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY,

Newark, N.J. GENTLEMEN: Your favor regarding duty on Hessian sand crucibles to hand, and I wish to state that I have been using these Hessian sand crucibles for the past twenty years and know of no other crucible so well adapted to my particular line of business.

There being no crucible of this same kind manufactured at home, I can see no cause for a duty on those imported. Therefore I will be pleased if the Hessian sand crucibles can be placed on the free list. Very truly, yours,

G. W. SEIFRIED.

DETROIT, December 4, 1908. AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY,

Newark, N.J. GENTLEMEN: We believe that Hessian sand crucibles should be placed on the free list, as they are used almost entirely for a class of work for which the “ Denver, or black-lead crucibles are not suitable.

And we do not think that the sales of the same in any way affect the interests of the American manufacturers of crucibles.

Elimination of the duties on the Hessian sand crucibles would mean a large saving to the manufacturers in our own line of business. Very truly, yours,

KUNZ & ROGERS.

NEWARK, N. J., December 1, 1908. THE AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY,

Newark, N. J. GENTLEMEN: We have been using crucibles of all kinds, and find that we could use Hessian sand crucibles in large quantities, providing that you could reduce the price, as we think the price too high altogether, but find them absolutely necessary for certain purposes that black-lead crucibles will not answer for. You have increased the price of these crucibles from time to time, and we think something ought to be done to lower the price of these Hessian sand crucibles. Respectfully, yours,

ANDREW O. KIEFER.

NEWARK, N. J., December 4, 1908. AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY,

Newark, N. J. GENTLEMEN: In reply to yours of the 2d instant, we beg to say that we must use Hessian crucibles for refining purposes, as the American crucible will not stand the strain put upon it by the chemicals nor the heat that the foreign one does.

Trusting you succeed in relieving us of this unnecessary expense, we are, Respectfully, yours,

THE W. L. ROBERTSON Co.,
CHAS. JEFFREYS,

Secretary and Treasurer.

PHILADELPHIA, December 3, 1908. AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY,

Newark, N. J. GENTLEMEN: In answer to your letter of December 1, 1908, in our opinion we have no clay for making crucibles in the United States to take the place of the Hessian sand crucibles. Therefore they should come into the United States duty free.

Respectfully, yours,

PHILADELPHIA, December 3, 1908. AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY,

Newark, N. J. GENTLEMEN: In reply to yours, we beg to say that the Hessian sand crucibles can not be duplicated in this country, and there is no reason why a duty should be placed upon crucibles, as they can not be produced here, and therefore no American industry would be interfered with.

Hoping to have you succeed in having them put upon the free list, we are, Yours, very truly,

HASTINGS & Co.

NEW YORK, December 3, 1908. AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY.

GENTLEMEN: We believe that the Hessian sand crucible should be placed upon the free list, as the material is not found in this country, thus making the duty a burden instead of a protection to our industries.

We hope you will endeavor to convince the Ways and Means Committee of Congress that this is a righteous demand. Yours, truly,

DAY, CLARK & Co.

PHILADELPHIA, December 7, 1908. AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY,

Newark, N.J. GENTLEMEN: Replying to your favor of December 1, regarding the duty on Hessian sand crucibles which you desire to have removed, I have to say that as a large user of such wares I unqualifiedly assert that I have found no kind of crucible which could take its place in my line of work.

I have never found another make to be as generally adaptable, and as I know of no manufacturers who make crucibles of a like kind in this country see no reason why a duty should be imposed. Very truly, yours,

PAUL H. ROSENTHAL.

DAYTON, Ky., December 7, 1908. AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY,

Newark, N. J. GENTLEMEN: Understanding that there is to be a revision of the tariff, we take this opportunity of calling your attention to the fact that we believe the duty should be taken off of Hessian sand crucibles.

It is a well-known fact in our line of business that this is the only crucible that can be used for certain purposes in our line of work and that up to the present they have been unable to find any material in this country suitable for making them.

We believe that it would be well for you to take this matter up with the proper committee and see what can be done about same. Yours, very truly,

THE WADSWORTH WATCH CASE Co.

PHILADELPHIA, December 14, 1908. AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY,

Newark, N. J. DEAR SIR: We quite agree with you that the duty of 25 per cent on Hessian sand crucibles is excessive. These crucibles are not made in this country, and there is no crucible made here which can take its place or answer the same purpose. It seems but fair, under these circumstances, as there is a certain demand for the Hessian sand crucible in the arts, assay offices, and mints, that this crucible should be put on the free list. Yours, truly,

PHILLIPS & JACOBS.

BUFFALO, N. Y., December 14, 1908. AMERICAN OIL AND SUPPLY COMPANY,

Newark, N.J. DEAR SIR: We hereby agree with others that Hessian sand crucibles are the best crucible for the melting of gold, silver, etc. The socalled “Denver,” or crucible of graphite or black lead, does not answer our requirements or do the work satisfactorily. Yours, very truly,

KING & EISELE.
C. G.

GUERNSEY.

[Paragraph 96.)

STATEMENT OF CHARLES L. CASEY, REPRESENTING THE CAM

BRIDGE ART POTTERY COMPANY, OF CAMBRIDGE, OHIO.

MONDAY, November 23, 1908. Mr. CASEY. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the committee, my position here is just a little bit different from that of the other domestic pottery men, for the reason that I have no competitor in this countr My line is the manufacture of several standard lines of pottery and earthenware cooking utensils, brown on the outside and white lining on the inside. Here are some specimens [exhibiting same). That is a brown piece of earthenware, brown on the outside, with a white porcelain lining, with a clear glaze over the whole outer surface and the inner surface also.

We have been making these goods for the past four years. When we first started in the price was very satisfactory. Of course, it was experimental, and other factories in this country had tried to produce some similar lines, but they were not successful. Of course, after we had demonstrated that we could produce the article and there was a market for it, the price for it suddenly dropped about 25 per cent, owing to the action of the importers, and later on I had a little experience at the custom-house, where they were trying to give me a duty of only 25 per cent and classing my goods as common brown earthenware, with the idea that no skill was required in the labor or process of manufacture, and for that reason classing my product as common brown earthenware. The case came up and was

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