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TRANSLATIONS

OF

PINDAR.

Be

A

0 W

THE FIRST OLYMPIC ODE.

TO HIERO OF SYRACUSE, VICTOR IN THE HORSE

RACE.

Can earth, or fire, or liquid air,
With water's sacred stream compare ? ·
Can aught that wealthy tyrants hold
Surpass the lordly blaze of gold ?-
Or lives there one, whose restless eye
Would seek along the empty sky,
Beneath the sun's meridian ray,
A warmer star, a purer day?-
O thou, my soul, whose choral song
Would tell of contests sharp and strong,
Extol not other lists above
The circus of Olympian Jove ;
Whence borne on many a tuneful tongue,
To Saturn's seed the anthem sung,

With harp, and flute and trumpet's call,
Hath sped to Hiero's festival.

Bi

Over sheep-clad Sicily

Who the righteous sceptre beareth, Every flower of virtue's tree

Wove in various wreath he weareth.

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But the bud of poesy

Is the fairest flower of all; Which the bards, in social gleu

11. Strew round Hiero's wealthy han The harp on yonder pin suspended,

Seize it, boy, for Pisa's sake;
And that good steed's, whose thought wa

wake
A joy with anxious fondness blended :-
No sounding lash his sleek side rended :-

By Alpheus' brink, with feet of flame, Self-driven, to the goal he tended :

And earn'd the olive wreath of fame

For that dear lord, whose righteous name
The sons of Syracusa tell :-
Who loves the generous courser well :
Belov’d himself by all who dwell

Fall

B

In Pelop's Lydian colony.-
-Of earth-embracing Neptune, he
The darling, when, in days of yore,
All lovely from the caldron red
By Clotho's spell delivered,
The youth an ivory shoulder bore.-

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-Well !—these are tales of mystery !-
And many a darkly-woven lie
With men will

easy

credence gain ;
While truth, calm truth, may speak in vain ;
For eloquence, whose honey'd sway
Our frailer mortal wits obey,
Can honour give to actions ill,
And faith to deeds incredible ;-
And bitter blame, and praises high,
Fall truest from posterity.-

But, if we dare the deeds rehearse
Of those that

aye

endure, 'Twere meet that in such dangerous verse Our every

word were pure.Then, son of Tantalus, receive A plain unvarnish'd lay!-

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