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62D CONGRESS, | HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

1st Session.

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PUBLIC BUILDING AT GETTYSBURG, PA.

AUGUST 8, 1911.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of

the Union and ordered to be printed.

Mr. SHEPPARD, from the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds,

submitted the following

REPORT.

[To accompany H. R. 13277.] The Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, to which was referred the bill (H. R. 13277), to increase the limit of cost of the public building authorized to be constructed at Gettysburg, Pa., beg leave to report the same with the recommendation that the bill do pass.

The bill provides an increase of $17,000 in the limit of cost of this building. The committee finds, after investigation and after consultation with the Supervising Architect of the Treasury Department, that this building can not be finished in marble, as was originally intended, for less than $117,000. Unless the limit is extended, as provided in this bill, the building will have to be constructed of some such material as limestone or sandstone. This would be entirely out of keeping with the surroundings of the building.

The town of Gettysburg is completely surrounded by the famous battle field of Gettysburg, which is now one of the great national military parks of the country. As is well known, this battle field is now filled with costly and handsome monuments of marble and granite, erected by various States of the Union and various military organizations throughout the country. The United States has expended millions of dollars in preserving and beautifying this battle field,

Besides the use of the building authorized by the present bill for post-office purposes, it is to be used by the Gettysburg Battlefield Commission to preserve the maps and records of the battle. The committee is therefore of the opinion that this building should be constructed with an outside finish of marble, in order that it may be in keeping with its purposes and surroundings.

It is especially desired that the building be completed by the time of the fiftieth anniversary of the battle, and in order that this may be done the committee unanimously recommends the immediate passage of the bill, with the following amendment:

Insert in line 4, before the word “for,'' the words "June twenty fifth, nineteen hundred and ten."

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62D CONGRESS,

1st Session.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. {

REPORT
No. 141.

PUBLIC BUILDING, LYNCHBURG, VA.

AUGUST 9, 1911.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of

the Union and ordered to be printed.

Mr. SHEPPARD, from the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds,

submitted the following

REPORT.

[To accompany H. R. 13391.]

The Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, to which was referred the bill of the House (H. R. 13391) to i crease the limit of cost of the public building at Lynchburg, Va., respectfully report the same with the recommendation that the bill do pass. The Congress appropriated $150,000 to make imperative extensions and improvements to the existing public building at Lynchburg, Va. The original plan of improvement was abandoned by the Government architects owing to insuperable difficulties due to the topography of the building site, and they decided to demolish a building that cost $138,000 to erect on its ruins a new building within the appropriation of $150,000 made by Congress solely for “extension and improvement.'

In order to get the necessary floor space for actual Government needs it was found necessary to construct the second and third stories of the new building of cheap stucco material, which is now admitted by the Treasury officials to have been a mistake. The chamber of commerce, board of trade, merchants' associations, and councils of Lynchburg have protested against being given a building of less imposing appearance and of a less permanent character than the old building which was demolished, and the Government officials advise that, with a view to greater permanence and the need of further extension made necessary by the remarkable growth of the town, it would be better and ultimately more economical to substitute stone for cheap stucco in the new building. The contractors have just now reached a point in the process of construction that necessitates immediate action by Congress if the proposed change is made. Upon a full review of the facts the committee unanimously recommends the suggested alteration.

It is submitted that to build the first story of stone and the remaining stories of cheap stucco, as is necessary under the present appropriation, would constitute an architectural blot that ought not to be permitted. The bill under consideration provides an increase of $30,000 in the limit of cost, which is sufficient to build the second and third stories of the same material as the first, insuring sightliness and permanence and rendering feasible future extension as the necessity shall arise.

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62D CONGRESS,

1st Session.

}

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. {

REPORT No. 144.

REDUCTION OF DUTIES ON WOOL AND MANUFACTURES

OF WOOL.

August 12, 1911.-Ordered to be printed.

Mr. UNDERWOOD, from the committee of conference, submitted the

following

CONFERENCE REPORT.

[To accompany H. R. 11019.)

The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H. R. 11019) to reduce the duties on wool and manufactures of wool, having met, after full and free conference, have agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective Houses as follows:

That the House recede from its disagreement to the amendment of the Senate and agree to the same with an amendment, as follows:

In lieu of the matter inserted by said amendment insert the following;

That the Act approved August fifth, nineteen hundred and nine, entitled An Act to provide revenue, equalize duties, and encourage the industries of the United States, and for other purposes,is hereby amended by striking out all of Schedule K thereof, being paragraphs three hundred and sixty to three hundred and ninety-five, inclusive, and inserting in lieu thereof the following:

SCHEDULE K. WOOL AND MANUFACTURES THEREOF.

"360. On wool of the sheep, hair of the camel, goat, alpaca, and other like animals, and on all wools and hair on the skin of such animals, the duty shall be twenty-nine per centum ad valorem.

"361. On all noils, top waste, card waste, slubbing waste, roving waste, ring waste, yarn waste, bur waste, thread waste, garnetted waste, shoddies, mungo, flocks, wool extract, carbonized wool, carbonized noils, and on all other wastes and on woolen rags composed wholly of wool or of which wool is the component material of chief value, and not specially provided for in this section, the duty shall be twenty-nine per centum ad valorem.

"362. On combed wool or tops and roving or roping, made wholly of wool or camel's hair, or of which wool or camel's hair is the component material of chief value, and all wools and hair which have been advanced in any manner or by any process of manufacture beyond the washed or scoured condition, not specially provided for in this section, the duty shall be thirty-two per centum ad valorem.

363. On yarns made wholly of wool or of which wool is the component material of chief value, the duty shall be thirty-five per centum ad valorem.

"364. On cloths, knit fabrics, flannels not for underwear, composed wholly of wool or of which wool is the component material of chief value, women's and children's dress goods, coat linings, Italian cloths, bunting, and goods of similar description and character, clothing, ready-made, and articles of wearing apparel of every description, including shauls, whether knitted or woven, and knitted articles of every description made up or manufactured wholly or in part, felts not woven, and not specially provided for in this section, webbings, gorings, suspenders, braces, bandings, beltings, bindings, braids, galloons, edgings, insertings, flouncings, fringes, gimps, cords, cords and tassels, ribbons, ornaments, laces, trimmings, and articles made wholly or in part of lace, embroideries and all articles embroidered by hand or machinery, head nets, nettings, buttons or barrel buttons or buttons of other forms for tassels or ornaments, and manufactures of wool ornamented with beads or spangles of whatever material composed, on any of the foregoing and on all manufactures of every description made by any process of wool or of which wool is the component material of chief value, whether containing india rubber or not, not specially provided for in this section, the duty shall be forty-nine per centum ad valorem.

365. On all blankets, and flannels for underwear, composed wholly of wool, or of which wool is the component material of chief value, the duty shall be thirty-eight per centum ad valorem.

11 366. On Aubusson, Axminster, moquette, and chenille carpets, figured or plain, and all carpets or carpeting of like character or description; on Saxony, Wilton, and Tournay velvet carpets, figured of plain, and all carpets or carpeting of like character or description, and on carpets of every description, woven whole for rooms, and Oriental, Berlin, Aubusson, Axminster, and similar rugs, the duty shall be fifty per centum ad valorem.

367. On Brussels carpets, figured or plain, and all carpets or carpeting of like character or description, and on velvet and ta pestry relret carpets, figured or plain, printed on the warp or otheruise, and all carpets or carpeting of like character or description, the duty shall be forty per centum ad valorem.

368. On tapestry Brussels carpets, figured or plain, and all carpets or carpeting of like character or description, printed on the warp or otherwise; on treble ingrain, three-ply, and all-chain Venetian carpets, on wool Dutch and two-ply ingrain carpets; on druggets and bockings, printed, colored, or otherwise; and on carpets and carpeting of wool or of which wool is the component material of chief value, not specially provided for in this section, the duty shall be thirty per centum ad valorem.

869. Mats, rugs for floors, screens, covers, hassocks, bedsides, art squares, and other portions of carpets or carpeting made wholly of wood or of which wool is the component material of chief value, and not specially provided for in this section, shall be subjected to the rate of duty herein imposed on carpets or carpeting of like character or description.

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