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62D CONGRESS,

1st Session.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. I No. 35.

REPORT

EXTENSION AND WIDENING OF COLORADO AVENUE

AND KENNEDY STREET NW.

May 18, 1911.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of

the Union and ordered to be printed.

Mr. JOHNSON of Kentucky, from the Committee on the District of

Columbia, submitted the following

REPORT.

[To accompany H. R. 8649.]

The Committee on the District of Columbia, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 8649) to authorize the extension and widening of Colorado Avenue NW. from Longfellow Street to Sixteenth Street, and of Kennedy Street NW. through lot No. 800, square No. 2718, report the same back to the House with the recommendation that it do pass.

This bill was introduced at the request of the Commissioners of the District of Columbia, who submitted the draft of the same, with the following statement of their reasons for requesting its passage:

OFFICE COMMISSIONERS DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA,

Washington, April 15, 1911. Hon. Ben JOHNSON, Chairman of Committee on District of Columbia,

House of Representatives. Sir: The Commissioners of the District of Columbia have the honor to inclose herewith a draft of a bill entitled "A bill to authorize the extension and widening of Colorado Avenue northwest from Longfellow Street to Sixteenth Street, and of Kennedy Street northwest through lot numbered eight hundred, square twentyseven hundred and eighteen," and to request that it be enacted.

A blueprint is inclosed upon which is indicated, in red, the land proposed to be condemned under the provisions of the bill. The estimated cost of this land is $17,538, and the bill provides that the total cost, together with the expenses of the condemnation proceedings, shall be assessed by the jury on the surrounding and abutting property as benefits.

The extension and widening of Colorado Avenue, as proposed in the bill, is believed to be very desirable. This avenue is becoming an important thoroughfare between Fourteenth and Sixteenth Streets, and should be opened to the full width of 120 feet, as laid down in the highway extension plans, before the increase in the value of the land or the erection of improvements would make the cost prohibitive. The land to be taken for the widening is divided into a number of small holdings, and it is impracticable to acquire it by dedication.

The widening of Kennedy Street is also desirable. This street is now open between Fourteenth and Sixteenth Streets with the exception of a small triangular part of lot 800, square 2718, and it has been found impossible to acquire this small portion by dedication. The District appropriation act for the fiscal year 1912 contains an appropriation of $5,600 for grading and improving this street between Fourteenth and Sixteenth Streets, and unless this small piece of land is acquired the street can not be improved to its full width at Sixteenth Street. Very respectfully,

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, By Cono H. RUDOLPH, President.

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6278 CONGRESS, Į HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. {

REPORT
No. 38.

GERTRUDE M. HUBBARD

May 19, 1911.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of

the Union and ordered to be printed.

Mr. SLAYDEN, from the Committee on the Library, submitted the

following

REPORT.

(To accompany H. R. 9833.]

The Committee on the Library, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 9833) providing for the acceptance of and funding the bequest of Gertrude M. Hubbard, having considered the same, report it to the House with the following amendment:

Strike out all of section 3 and substitute therefor the following: Sec. 3. That in compliance with said conditions the principal of the sum so received and paid into the Treasury of the United States shall be set apart and credited on the books of the Treasury Department as a perpetual trust fund; and the sum of eight hundred dollars, being equivalent to four per centum on the principal of said trust fund, be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any moneys in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and such appropriation shall be deemed a permanent annual appropriation and shall be expended in the manner and for the purposes herein authorized, and as provided in the said bequest.

As amended the committee recommend that the bill do pass.

The bequest is for the enlargement of a collection already (in 1898) accepted by Congress and now in the possession of the Library.

March 21, 1898, Mrs. Gertrude M. Hubbard, in a letter to John Russell Young, the Librarian of Congress, offered to the Library, for the benefit of the people of the United States, the collection of engravings made by the late Gardiner Greene Hubbard, stating that it was in accordance with the wishes of her husband. She also said that she wanted a gallery in the Library set aside and devoted to the collection to be known as the Gardiner Greene Hubbard Gallery. She also declared her purpose to add to the collection from time to time and to provide in her will for its further increase by leaving an endowment fund of $20,000.

It was not practicable to meet the condition that a special gallery in the Library be set aside and exclusively devoted to the collection, and Mrs. Hubbard waived that demand.

The resolution accepting the gift became a law July 7, 1898.

H. R. 9833 is a bill to accept a gift of money. Gifts of money are specially desired, and as such gifts frequently contemplate that an income is to be derived therefrom, and to be used, some means of assuring an income must be found. The Government does not make investments for the purpose of getting an income, and in cases like this it seems entirely proper that Congress should provide for it in the manner suggested in this bill. It is exactly what was done in the case of the bequest of the Englishman, James Smithson, whose bequest has been drawing 6 per cent interest since 1838.

The United States encourages its soldiers by allowing 4 per cent interest on deposits, and usually is indebted to the enlisted men to the extent of nearly $2,000,000.

Your committee believe that it is quite as good policy to encourage gifts for its own benefit by equally liberal treatment.

The income from the $20,000 will be used to purchase other engravings to be added to the collection.

It is quite the customary thing in libraries to have gifts called by the names of the citizens who made them. It is a convenience and detail of administration, and if it were not stipulated that this should be known as The Gardiner Greene Hubbard Collection it would still be done. It would not be gracious to refuse such recognition to citizens who are disposed to add to our art and literary treasures.

The appropriations of Congress suffice only for the purchase of the more ordinary books, maps, etc. For rare books, for those that are valuable because of their bindings, or desirable for historic and sentimental reasons, no provision is made.

Yet no great library would be complete without them. Like the British Museum and other great libraries, we must get our increment chiefly from bequests. We should encourage such donations. We can not do it in any better way than by meeting the generosity of the citizens with a gracious acceptance.

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620 CONGRESS, Į HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

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REPORT
No. 39.

AMENDING ACT MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR NAVAL

SERVICE, FISCAL YEAR 1912.

MAY 26, 1911.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the

Union and ordered to be printed.

Mr. PADGETT, from the Committee on Naval Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT.

[To accompany H. R. 9442.)

The Committee on Naval Affairs, to whom was referred a bill (H. R. 9442) to amend an act approved March 4, 1911, entitled “An act making appropriations for the naval service for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and twelve, and for other purposes," having had the same under consideration, report the bill back to the House with the recommendation that it do pass.

Section 1 of the bill amends the naval appropriation act passed at the close of the last session of the Sixty-first Congress making appropriations for the naval service for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1912, by striking out the following provision under the appropriation “Pay of the Navy:" clerks to paymasters and not exceeding ten clerks to accounting officers at yards and stations, general storekeepers ashore and afloat not exceeding ten clerks, and receiving ships, and other vessels; two clerks to general inspectors of Pay Corps; one clerk to pay officer in charge of deserters' rolls; and inserting in lieu thereof the following:

Clerks to paymasters at yards and stations, general storekeepers ashore, and receiving ships, and other vessels; two clerks to general inspectors of the Pay Corps; one clerk to pay officer in charge of deserters' rolls; pot exceeding ten clerks to accounting officers at yards and stations, and not exceeding ten clerks to general storekeepers afloat.

This amendment is recommended by the committee in order that the law should be made to read as intended. The Senate adopted an amendment to the naval bill under the appropriation "Pay of the Navy," which provided for clerks to accounting officers” and clerks to storekeepers ashore and afloat,” without any limitation as to the total additional number of clerks authorized. Upon investigation by the conferees on the part of the House it was learned that the Senate amendment provided for an increase of 46 clerks, and to this

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