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swear, if you do not find her mind very different from her person.” “Swear for yourself, Frederic lord Burton,” said lady Jane; “you will have enough to do in the world to answer for your own sins, without being responsible for my good qualities. What suppose I have predetermined to hate her?” and she gave a laughing look towards Miss Delmont. “One thing I would recommend to you, Jane,” said lady Cecilia Evelyn, who had hitherto continued silent, with the most impenetrable gravity, “and that is, not to be so familiar with persons of an inferior rank.” “My dear Cecilia,” said lady Jane, “you are, I know, generally more correct and composed in your behaviour than I am; but in the present instance you are wrong. Miss Stanhope is a lady by birth, education, manners, and disposition; such lady M— has described her to me, and as such she is equal to either of us, except E 5 that

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that she has not the privilege of stitching ladyship to her name, which, depend upon it, neither makes you or me a bit better, or more amiable. I speak now as seriously as you do, for in this instance I cannot allow myself to be dictated to, even by you, Cecilia.” . . “Well, Jane, do as you please,” replied her sister. “But I wonder what my father would say, if he heard all this new doctrine you have lately taken up.” “I should be sorry to think that my father and I could differ upon such a subject,” replied lady Jane. “Butcome, Frederic, we are going to ride out, and as you, have no saddle-horses with you, Charlotte Delmont will, I am sure, lend you one she had given to her the other day.” - “: Oh dear, that will do excellently!” cried Miss. Delmont; “I am afraid to ride. him myself, till some one else has tried. him; and if lord Burton would break him. into cantering for me, I should be very much obliged indeed, and I can ride my

own grey in the mean while.” Lord Burton promised to do the best he could for her during the short period of his visit, and the party broke up to dress for their excursion.

CHAPTER VI. >

Get weapons ho, And raise some special officer of might. - Othello.

The Attack.

“WELL, really this London is the dullest of places,” said Charles Melville, the third morning after Mr. Wilmot had left them, “it is dreariness itself: I have a great notion that, to-morrow morning, I shall run away from you for two or three days into the country.” * . “You could not do better than go and pay a visit to sir Harry Morley, your old * E 6 schoolschoolfellow,” replied sir Charles; “it will fill up the time.” “No,” replied Charles, “that is not the place whither I intend to bend my steps. , I was thinking yesterday that lady Anne Milsome would think it rude if I left England without paying her a visit, and in consequence I thought of going to Ilfracombe for a day or two.” “I see no necessity for it at all, Charles,” replied his father—“not the least in the world—not the least.” “No,” answered Charles, quietly, “there is perhaps no absolute necessity; but it will be no more than polite and proper attention.” . “But you have a great deal to do in town,” urged the baronet—“you have a great many things to order, a great many to buy: you forget all you have to do.” “No, indeed, my dear sir,” replied Charles, “I think I have done very nearly every thing: I have ordered every sort of thing that the fertile imagination of man - could

could invent, besides paper enough to write my travels, if they should extend all through the kingdoms of Fez and Morocco. I have also a full month to spare.” “But Ilfracombe is so far distant,” continued his father. “Not within fifty miles so far as sir Harry Morley's,” answered Charles, with a smile. “Well, well, Charles, if you have resolved to go, do as you like,” proceeded sir Charles Melville; “it is no business of mine: I have nothing to do with it. How do you go?” “Oh, of course by the Barnstaple coach,” replied his son: “I shall not be gone above five or six days.” “As you please—as you please,” rejoined sir Charles, and left the room. “You are an odd creature, Charles,” said Caroline, as soon as her father was gone: “you never thought of going to see lady Anne till Mary was there, and - yet

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