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In this case the sentence was, on the 18th of May, 1872, commuted to imprisonment in the city jail for the term of twelve months, and under a writ of habeas corpus granted by the judge of the circuit court for the city of Richmond, the prisoner was discharged from custody on the 14th of June following. Subsequently the court of: appeals granted a writ of error and supersedeas to the judgment rendered by the circuit court, and the prisoner was remanded to jail, where he remained three months, and was finally pardoned on the 17th of March, 1873, because all these proceedings endured by the petitioner, and the imprisonment he had undergone, were considered sufficient punishment for the offence committed, and executive clemency was asked for by eleven of the jury and the Commonwealth's attorney who tried the petitioner, by the officers of the court and city, by the injured party, and by many good and worthy citizens.

5. John White, alias Geo. W. Johnson, of Clarke county, convicted of horse stealing at the February term (1868) of the circuit court for the county of Clarke, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of fourteen years.

Pardoned March 18th, 1873, on condition that he leave the State and never more return, for the following reasons : Executive clemency was asked for by the court, Commonwealth's attorney, a portion of the jury, the party injured, and several citizens; and granted on the condition above mentioned, and because the original sentence was excessive.

6. Landon F. Lovett, of Loudoun county, convicted of horse stealing at the October term (1866) of the circuit court for the county of Loudoun, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of fourteen years.

Pardoned April 3d, 1873, for the following reasons : There is grave doubt as to the guilt of the petitioner, and even if guilty he has already endured suflicient punishment for the offence; two-thirds of the jury who tried him, twenty-three members of the legislature, and nearly one hundred citizens, recommend his pardon.

7. James Reilly, of Norfolk city, convicted of manslaughter at the October term (1872) of the corporation court of the city of Norfolk, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of five years.

Pardoned May 27th, 1873, for the following reasons: That newly discovered evidence, not before the jury, but filed with the petition for pardon, if it does not conclusively establish the innocence of the petitioner, at least renders his guilt exceedingly doubtful; because substantially recommended, before said evidence was produced, by the judge who presided at the trial, by a portion of the jury, by nearly all the members of the bar of Norfolk, by the mayor and many prominent citizens.

8. Charles T. Emanuel, of Campbell county, convicted of horse stealing at the May term (1867) of the county court for the county of Campbell, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of twelve years.

Pardoned May 31st, 1873, on condition that he leave the State never to return, for the following reasons : Because recommended by the attorney for the Commonwealth who tried the case, endorsed by the judge who presided at the trial, on the ground that the punishment awarded by the jury was excessive (with which I fully concur), in which recommendation a large number of the prominent citizens of Campbell county united, including the owner of the property stolen.

9. Frederick N. Glascock, of Fauquier county, convicted of manslaughter at the April term (1873) of the circuit court for the county of Fauquier, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of two years.

1873, June 19th, sentence reduced to imprisonment in the county jail for the term of one year from the date of his sentence (26th April, 1873), and pardon granted on condition that the prisoner serve out that term; for the following reasons: The petition in this case is for absolute pardon, and is signed by the jury who tried the petitioner, by the members of the bar and ministers of the gospel of Fauquier county, and by nearly nine hundred good and worthy citizens. Under all the circumstances it is considered that one year's imprisonment in the county jail, in addition to what he has already endured, is sufficient expiation of the offence committed.

10. Chapman Johnson (colored), of Staunton, convicted of petit larceny at a magistrate's court of the city of Staunton, and sentenced to imprisonment in the city jail for the term of sixty days.

Pardoned August 20th, 1873, for the following reasons : The petitioner is afflicted with pulmonary disease, which is aggravated by confinement in prison to such an extent as to endanger his life-so officially certified and sworn to by the physician to the jail, and indorsed by the mayor, and the petition signed by a large number of citizens.

11. Philip Epps (colored), of Amelia county, convicted of assault and battery at the February term (1873) of the county court for the county of Amelia, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of one year.

Pardoned September 3d, 1873, for the following reasons : The petitioner is a youth of only fourteen years of age, and has served six months in the penitentiary, where, in my opinion, he never ought to have been sent. The judge who presided at the trial, the Commonwealth's attorney who conducted the trial, officers of the court and county, and many good citizens, recommend a reduction of sentence to some lighter punishment.

12. William Curtis (colored), of Richmond city, convicted of forgery at the February term (1871) of the hustings court of the city of Richmond, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of three years.

Pardoned September 5th, 1873, for the following reasons: This party has served out over three-fourths of the term for which he was sentenced, and has become incurably diseased with consumption—the surgeon of the penitentiary, in his last certificate, stating as follows: “I fear he will only live a week or two-certainly, in my opinion, not longer than the middle of October."

13. Allen T. Mitchell, of Patrick county, convicted of an attempt to produce abortion at the May term (1873) of the county court for the county of Patrick, and sentenced to imprisonment in the connty jail for the term of six months.

Pardoned October 25th, 1873, for the following reasons : The petitioner has been sufficiently punished for all the wrong done or intended. This is the opinion of most of the county officers, members of the bar, and a large number of citizens, who have presented several petitions asking for his pardon, and but about one month of the sentence is unexpired.

14. Theophilus Stroup, of Washington county, convicted of murder in the second degree at the September term (1868) of the county court for the county of Washington, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of five years, and five years additional to that sentence, made by the circuit court of the city of Richmond, for second conviction.

Pardoned November 30, 1873, for the following reasons: This conviction should not have been had, and for the reason that the conviction on which it was based was for an offence committed prior to the offence on which the first conviction was had; and this is now the opinion of the court before which the conviction was had.

15. Louis Francis (colored), of Norfolk, convicted of false swearing in registering himself at the June term (1873) of the corporation court of the city of Norfolk, and sentenced to pay a fine of one cent, costs of prosecution, and be imprisoned in the city jail for the term of twelve months.

Pardoned November 17th, 1873, for the following reasons : The petitioner, while intoxicated, registered under a wrong name—but it is evident that no fraud was intended, for he never attempted to register under any other name--and for this reason, and because he has suffered five months' imprisonment, pardon is recommended by the judge and the Commonwealth's attorney who tried him, and by others.

16. Ebenezer Allison (colored), of Petersburg, convicted of burglary at the December term (1873) of the hustings court of the city of Richmond, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of five years,

Pardoned November 22d, 1873, for the following reasons: The petitioner was convicted of burglary, but from all the facts in the case it is evident that it was but a mere suspicion of burglary. He was convicted on the testimony of one witness, who now states that he has grave doubts of the intent to commit a crime. The petitioner has always borne a good reputation prior to this affair, as certified by many good citizens, both of Richmond and Petersburg, who have known him long and well.

17. Rosa Bowles, of Richmond city, convicted of grand larceny at the September term (1873) of the hustings court of the city of Richmond, and sentenced to the penitentiary for the term of three years.

Pardoned December 31st, 1873, on condition that she forthwith leave the State, never to return, for the following reasons : The prisoner is a mere child, of weak mind, some 13 years old, and her pardon on this account is recommended by the judge, jury and Commonwealth's attorney who tried the case, and others. The efforts of her attorneys, Messrs. H. A. & J. S. Wise, secured her a place at the “ House of the Good Shepherd,” in Baltimore, Md., whither she is sent.

18. William Stewart, of Danville. convicted of grand larceny at the November term (1871) of the corporation court for the town of Danville, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of three years. .

Pardoned December 24, 1873, for the following reasons : First, that the prisoner was, by mistake of the court, Commonwealth's attorney, and his own attorney, convicted of grand larceny, whereas the offence committed was merely petit larceny. Second, the prisoner has suffered sufficient punishment for the offence committed.

19. Jesse Lowry, of Washington county, convicted of forgery at the May term (1872) of the county court for the county of Washington, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of two years.

Pardoned December 24th, 1873, for the following reasons : First, because earnestly recommended to executive clemency by the jury who tried the prisoner, in their verdict, as also by the judge and Commonwealth's attorney by whom he was tried. Second, because he has been sufficiently punished for the offence committed.

20. C. P. Sively, of Alleghany county, convicted of malicious cutting at the November term (1873) of the circuit court for the county of Alleghany, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of one year.

1873, December 24th, sentence reduced to imprisonment in the county jail of Alleghany county until the 28th day of December, 1874, and pardon granted on condition: First, that he serve out the above term; and second, that he utterly abstain, for the space of five years from this date, from the use of ardent spirits or intoxicating liquors of any kind to any extent, except medicinally, and then only upon the certificate of a reputable and regular practicing physician, and to the amount prescribed by him.

21. Bernard Tracy, of Richmond city, convicted of assault with intent to maim, disfigure, disable and kill, at the September term (1872) of the hustings court of the city of Richmond, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of five years.

Pardoned December 29th, 1873, on condition that he forth with leave the State, never to return, for the following reasons: First, because recommended by ten (10) of the jury and the Commonwealth's attorney, and other officers of the court, and a large number of good and worthy citizens. Second, because of previous good character. Third, because he has suffered sufficient punishment already.

22. William Marshall, of Richmond city, convicted of obtaining money under false pretences at the June term (1872) of hustings court of the city of Richmond, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of three years.

Pardoned December 29th, 1873, on condition that he forthwith leave the State and never return, for the following reasons: First, because recommended by eleven (11) of the jury who tried him, by the Commonwealth's attorney who prosecuted him, and other officers of the court, together with the endorsement of the judge who presided at his trial, in the following words: “I believe, from my knowledge of the man, that if now released he would not be likely again to be guilty of violation of the law.” Second, because the circumstances under which the offence was committed, together with the previous good character of the petitioner, show that he is not a vicious or depraved man at heart; and it is hoped that his hard experience for this one transgression will reform him altogether.

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