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OATH OF OFFICE. The members-elect, as their respective districts were called, then came forward, presented their certificates of election, and each took and subscribed to the following constitutional oath of office, administered by the Hon. Alden Anderson, Lieutenant-Governor, President of the Senate:

I do solemnly swear that I will support the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the State of California, and that I will faithfully discharge the duties of the office of State Senator, according to the best of my ability.

The President announced the qualification of all the Senators, and the Senators having assumed their seats, declared that a quorum of all the Senators was present.

APPOINTMENTS BY SECRETARY. The Secretary of the Senate announced; by virtue of the authority vested in him by Section 237 of the Political Code, that he had made the following appointments of attachés for the temporary organization of the Senate:

Postmistress--Miss Callie Johnson,
Gatekeepers-N. L. Smith, J. T. Nagle and T. F. Frazer.
Pages-Donn Shields, Henry Weeks, and Alfred Oldfield.

TEMPORARY ORGANIZATION EFFECTED. Temporary organization having been effected, the President put the question, "What is the pleasure of the Senate?

RESOLUTION.
The following resolution was offered by Senator Leavitt:
Resolved, That the Senate do now proceed to the election of the following statutory
officers, in the order named:

President pro tem.
Secretary
Minute Clerk.
Sergeant-at-Arms.
Chaplain.

Resolution read, and adopted.
The President thereupon declared nominations for the office of Presi-

pro tem. of the Senate in order.

dent

NOMINATION FOR AND ELECTION OF PRESIDENT PRO TEM. OF THE SENATE.

Senator Leavitt placed in nomination for the office of President pro tem of the Senate, the Hon. Edward I. Wolfe of San Francisco, State Senator from the Twenty-first District.

The President put the question, “Are there any other nominations for President pro tem. of the Senate?” There being no response, the nominations were declared closed. The roll was called, with the following result: For Wolfe-Senators Anderson, Bauer, Belshaw, Broughton, Bunkers, Carter, Coggins, Cortin, Diggs, Emmons, French, Greenwell, Habn, Haskins, Irish, Keane, Leavitt, Leeke, Lokens, Lynch, Markey, Mattos, McKee, Muenter, Nelson, Pendleton, Ralston, Rambo, Lowell Rosh, Sanford, Savage, Selvage, Shortridge, Simpson, Ward, Welch, Woodward, 201 Wright-39.

Whereupon the President declared Senator Wolfe duly elected President pro tem. of the Senate for the thirty-sixth session of the Legislature.

NOMINATION FOR AND ELECTION OF SECRETARY OF THE SENATE. The President declared nominations for Secretary of the Senate in order.

Senator Ralston placed the name of Lewis A. Hilborn of San Francisco in nomination for Secretary of the Senate.

The President put the question, “Are there any other nominations for the office of Secretary of the Senate ?”

There being no response, nominations were declared closed.
The roll was called, with the following result:

For Hilborn-Senators Anderson, Bauer, Belshaw, Bunkers, Carter, Coggins, Curtin, Diggs, Emmons, French, Greenwell, Hahn, Haskins, Irish, Keane, Leavitt, Leeke, Lukens, Lynch, Markey, Mattos, McKee, Muenter, Nelson, Pendleton, Ralston, Rambo, Rowell, Rush, Sanford, Savage, Selvage, Shortridge, Simpson, Ward, Welch, Wolfe, Woodward, and Wright-39.

Whereupon the President declared Lewis A. Hilborn duly and unanimously elected Secretary of the Senate.

NOMINATION FOR AND ELECTION OF MINUTE CLERK OF THE SENATE. The President declared nominations for Minute Clerk of the Senate in order.

Senator Hahn placed the name of D. G. Holt of Los Angeles County in nomination for Minute Clerk of the Senate.

The President put the question, “Are there any other nominations for the office of Minute Clerk of the Senate?

There being no response, nominations were declared closed. The roll was called, with the following result: For Holt-Senators Anderson, Bauer, Belshaw, Broughton, Bunkers, Carter, Coggins, Curtin, Diggs, Emmons, French, Greenwell, Hahn, Haskins, Irish, Keane, Leavitt, Leeke, Lukens, Lynch, Markey, Mattos, McKee, Muenter, Nelson, Pendleton, Ralston, Rambo, Rowell, Rush, Sanford, Savage, Selvage, Shortridge, Simpson, Ward, Welch, Wolfe, Woodward, and Wright-40.

Whereupon the President declared D. G. Holt duly and unanimously elected Minute Clerk of the Senate.

NOMINATION FOR AND ELECTION OF SERGEANT-AT-ARMS. The President announced nominations for the office of Sergeant-atArms of the Senate in order.

Senator Selvage placed the name of J. Louis Martin of Alameda County in nomination for Sergeant-at-Arms of the Senate.

The President put the question, “Are there any other nominations for the office of Sergeant-at-Arms of the Senate?

There being no response, nominations were declared closed.
The roll was called, with the following result:

For Martin-Senators Anderson, Bauer, Belshaw, Broughton, Bunkers, Carter, Coggins, Curtin, Diggs, Emmons, French, Green well, Hahn, Haskins, Irish, Keane, Leavitt, Leeke, Lukens, Lynch, Markey, Mattos, McKee, Muenter, Nelson, Pendleton, Ralston, Rambo, Rowell, Řush, Sanford, Savage, Selvage, Shortridge, Simpson, Ward, Welch, Wolfe, Woodward, and Wright-40.

Whereupon the President declared J. Louis Martin duly and unanimously elected Sergeant-at-Arms of the Senate.

NOMINATION FOR AND ELECTION OF CHAPLAIN. The President announced nominations for the office of Chaplain of the Senate in order.

Senator McKee placed the name of the Rev. W. S. Hoskinson of Sacramento in nomination for Chaplain of the Senate.

The President put the question, "Are there any other nominations for
the office of Chaplain of the Senate?
There being no response, the nominations were declared closed.
The roll was called, with the following result:
For Hoskinson-Senators Anderson, Bauer, Belshaw, Broughton, Bunkers, Carter,
Coggins, Curtin, Diggs, Emmons, French, Greenwell, Hahn, Haskins, Irish, Keane,
Leavitt,' Leeke, Lukens, Lynch, Markey, Mattos, McKee, Muenter, Nelson, Pendleton,
Ralston, Rambo, Rowell, Sanford, Savage, Selvage, Shortridge, Simpson, Ward, Welch,
Wolfe, Woodward, and Wright—39.

RESOLUTION.
The following resolution was offered:
By Senator Shortridge:

Resolved, That the standing rules of the Senate of the thirty-fifth session of the Legislature of California be, and they are, hereby adopted as the temporary rules of the Senate for the thirty-sixth session, with the exception that Rule 1 shall read:

The sessions of the Senate shall be daily, Sundays excepted, beginning at ten o'clock a, M., unless otherwise ordered by vote of the Senate.

Resolution read, and adopted.

TEMPORARY RULES OF THE SENATE. 1. Time of Meeting of Senate.

The sessions of the Senate shall be daily (Sundays excepted), beginning at ten o'clock A. M., unless otherwise ordered by vote of the Senate.

2. Calling to Order-Reading Journal.

The President shall call the Senate to order at the hour stated, and, if a quorum be present, the Journal of the proceedings of the preceding day shall be read, unless otherwise ordered by vote of the Senate.

3. Order of Business.

1. Roll Call.
2. Prayer by the Chaplain.
3. Reading and Approval of the Journal of the preceding day.
4. Presentation of Petitions.
5. Messages from the Assembly.
6. Messages from the Governor.
7. Motions, Resolutions, and Notices.
8. Reports of Standing Committees.
9. Reports of Select Committees.
10. Introduction and First Reading of Bills.
11. Consideration of Daily File.
12. Unfinished Business.
13. Special Orders of the Day.

14. Reports from the Committee on Enrolled and Engrossed Bills shall at all times be in order; provided, that the messages from State officers, other than the Governor, and from the Assembly, may, on motion of any Senator, be considered at any time.

4. President pro tem.-His Powers and Privileges.

The President pro tem, shall, in the absence of the President, take the chair and call the Senate to order at the hour of the meetings of the Senate, and have the same power as the President; but the President pro tem. shall vote only as any other member of the

Senate.

5. The Duties of Secretary.

1. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Senate to attend every day, call the roll, read all bills, amendments, resolutions, and all papers handed to him for that purpose by any member.

2. To superintend all copying and work necessary to be done for the Senate. To have supervision over all officers and employés of the Senate, other than the President of the Senate. To certify to, and transmit to the Assembly all bills, resolutions, and papers requiring the concurrence of the Assembly, immediately after their passage or adoption by the Senate.

3. To keep a correct journal of the proceedings of the Senate. 4. To notify the Assembly on the concurrence or disagreement by the Senate in any vote of the Assembly.

5. To permit no papers or records belonging to the Senate to be taken out of its cus. tody otherwise than in the regular course of business.

6. To assign to the Assistant Secretaries, and other officers, the duties pertaining to their offices.

6. Attendance, Duties, and Obligations of Senators.

No Senator shall absent himself from the service of the Senate without leave first obtained. A less number than a quorum of the Senate is hereby authorized to send the Sergeant-at-Arms, or any other person, for any and all absent Senators, as the majority of such Senators present shall agree, at the expense of such absent Senators, respectively, unless such excuse for non-attendance shall be made as the Senate, when a quorum is convened, shall judge sufficient, and in that case the expense shall be paid out of the Contingent Fund of the Senate; and this rule shall apply as well to the first convention of the Senate, at the legal time of meeting, as to each day of the session after the hour has arrived to which the Senate stood adjourned. The President or Acting President of the Senate, or less than a quorum thereof, shall have the power to issue process directed to the Sergeant-at-Arms, or to any other person, to com pel the attendance of Senators absent without leave. Any Senator who shall refuse to obey such process, unless sick or unable to attend, shall be deemed guilty of a contempt of the Senate, and the Sergeant-at-Arms, or any other person, to whom such process may be directed, shall have power to use such force as may be necessary to compel the attendance of such absent Senator, and for this purpose he may command the force of the county, or of any county in the State.

7. Reading of a Paper, if Objected to, Determined Without Debate.

When the reading of a paper is called for (except petitions), and the same is objected to by any Senator, it shall be determined by a vote of the Senate without debate. But this rule is not applicable to any bill, resolution, amendment, or other proposition which may be at the time directly under consideration.

8. Senators Must Address the President.

Every Senator, when he speaks, shall, standing in his place, address the President, and when he has finished he shall sit down.

No Senator shall speak more than twice in any one debate on the same day and at the same stage of the bill, without leave; and Senators who have once spoken shall not again be entitled to the floor (except for explanation) so long as any Senator who has not spoken shall desire to do so.

9. The Senators Entitled to Floor.

When two or more Senators rise at once, the President shall name the Senator who is to speak first.

10. Printing.

Five hundred copies of all bills shall be printed; and the Sergeant-at-Arms shall be required to certify to the reception by the Senate of all printed matter, and the quantity, One copy of each bill or paper printed by order of the Senate shall be delivered to each Senator, and a number equal to the committee to which each bill is referred, and the balance shall be distributed according to law.

11. Number of Copies to be Printed.

Five hundred copies shall be printed of each document or other matter ordered, unless the Senate especially directs a different number.

12. Executive Session.

On a motion, made and seconded, to close the doors of the Senate on the discussion of any business which may, in the opinion of the Senate, require an executive session, the President shall require all persons, except the Senators, President of Senate, Secretary, Sergeant-at-Arms, and Doorkeeper to withdraw, and during the discussion of said motion the doors shall remain closed; and every member and officer of the Senate shall keep secret all such matters, proceedings, and things whereof secrecy shall be enjoined by order of the Senate.

13. Printing the Daily Journal.

The Saperintendent of State Printing sball print five hundred copies of the Journal of every day's proceedings of the Senate to supply Senators and Assemblymen daily, during the session, with the Journal of the previous day's proceedings, and also a sufficient number of copies, with proper repaging, to bind at the end of the session of the Legislature, in book form, as the Journal of the Senate, required by law.

14. Committees, When to Report.

All committees of the Senate shall report their action on all bills referred to them before January 25th within ten days, except that all bills referred to them on and after January 25th shall be reported within five days, unless otherwise specially ordered, and wben such extension of time is ordered the Senate shall state the length of time, and the Secretary sball make record of the same in a book kept for that purpose.

15. Billz Passed on File," Placed at Foot of File.

When bills have been "passed on file" for the second time, they must be placed at the foot of the file in their regular order unless otherwise ordered by the Senate.

16. Standing Committees, Quorum of- What Constitutes.

The standing committees shall determine the number of such committee which shall constitute a quorum; provided, that not less than one third of the number of members constituting such committees shall in any case constitute such quorum.

17. Author to Speak Last.

The author of a bill, motion, or resolution shall have the privilege of closing the debate. 18. Form of Previous Question-Call of Senate.

The previous question sball be put in this form: "Shall the main question be now pat?" It shall only be admitted when demanded by a majority of the Senators present upon division; and its effect shall be to put an end to all debate and bring the Senate to a direct vote upon amendments reported by a committee, if any, upon pending amendments, and then upon the main question. On a motion for the previous question, and prior to the seconding of the same, a call of the Senate shall be in order; but after a majority of Senators shall have seconded such motion, no call shall be in order prior to the decision of the main question.

19. Order of Questions on Motion to Refer.

When a resolution shall be offered, or a motion made to refer any subject, and a different committee shall be proposed, the question shall be taken in the following order:

1. The Committee of the Whole Senate.
2. A Standing Committee.
3. A Select Committee.

20. Order of Engrossing and Enrolling Bills.

All bills ordered engrossed shall be delivered to the Engrossing Clerk by the Secretary of the Senate, and the receipt, in writing, of the Engrossing Clerk taken therefor; and all said bills shall be engrossed in the order of their receipt by said Engrossing Clerk. And all Senate bills shall, after their final passage by and receipt from the Assembly, be delivered to the Enrolling Clerk by the Secretary of the Senate in the order of their receipt from the Assembly, and the receipt in writing of said Enrolling Clerk taken therefor; and said bills shall be enrolled by the Enrolling Clerk in the order of their receipt from the Secretary of the Senate.

21. Printing for the Senate.

The Superintendent of State Printing shall not print for the use of the Senate any matter other than provided by law, unless upon a written order signed by the Secretary.

The Secretary may, when necessity requires, order from the State Printer such printing as he deems necessary to be printed in advance of the regular order of business, ander a specially prepared written order, to be known as a "Rush Order."

22. Petitions.

Every vote and a brief statement of the contents of each petition, memorial, or paper presented to the Senate shall be entered on the Journal.

2. No Records or Papers to be Taken from Desk.

The Secretary of the Senate shall not suffer any records or papers to be taken from the desk, or out of his custody, by any person except a chairman of a committee; but he shall deliver any bill or paper to be printed to the Superintendent of State Printing, and all bills ordered engrossed or enrolled to the Committee on Enrolled and Engrossed Bills, and take their receipt therefor.

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