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Statement of the Total cost of the Dry Dock al Boston, Massachusetts.
Objects of Expenditure

Materials. Labor. Total. Office

1,704 53

266 193 2,050) 723 Tools

2,537 8. 1,861 094

4,398 943 Iron and ste-1

11,305 4822,622 99 33,928 47 Driving machines

1,918 20

1,188 74 3,106 94 Scows, boais, &c.

1,355 594 687 091 2,042 683 Coffer dam

4,399 18

7,103 911 11,5 13 088 Pier wharves

7,286 012 6,871 83 14,157 845 Sprure and pine timber

1,967 31

1 967 31 Blacksmith shop

8,181 58

312 2111 8 493 791 Miscellanies

11,594 543 19,01.5 295 30,609 841 Dry quay wall

5.625 37 1002 81 5,728 18 Filling coffer dam

2,573 28 537 34 3,110 62 Surveys and plans of navy yards 1,132 18 1,764 37 2,896 55 Foundation of dock

18,686 16 22,451 40 41,137 56 Draining

11,654 44 9,537 27 21,191 71 Excavation

2,259 86

29.795 59 32 055 45 Masonry of dock

1116.953 52 |123,502 66 240,456 18 Great steam engine

12.015 12 2.846 76 14.861 88 Superin:endence

14.955 80 30 464 37 4.,420 17 Banking up behind walls, &c.

7,467 31 13,90 77 20,5.8 08 Turning gates :

16,806 66 9,509 95 26,316 61 Great pumps

28,114 55

28,114 55 Removing coffer dam, &c.

4.612 50 9,623 59 14,266 09 Steam engine house, wells, &c.

14.707 39 19,593 83 | 34,301 22 Floating gate

19,689 85 12.288 06 31,977 91 Wicket-gates

2,303 06

129 30 2,437 36 Total cost of the Dry Dock. 8 331,922 342 345,1 7 434677,089 781 Expenditures on the Dry Dock at Gosport, Virginia, to the 31st of Oct 1833. Office

1,788 911 959 871 2.748 78 Tools

16,286 22

17,849 49 34, 135 71 Iron, nails, &c.

11,155 29

11,155 29 Driving machine

94 75 929 68

1,024 431 Ligliers, boats, &c.

3,500 01 2,760 29 6,260 301 Coffer dam

9,317 60 14,215 21

23,532 84 Pier wharves

6,596 03

4,376 47 10,972 50 Pine timber, plank, &c.

6,639 05

6,639 05 Blacksmith's shop

4,942 09

615 08 5.557 17 Miscellaneous

14,087 21 20,954 34 35,010 55 Cob wliarves

4,042 42 9,980 17

14,022 59 Stables

10,027 96 2,750 39

12,778 38 Surveys and plans of vavy yards

1,057 69 2,302 57

3,360 26 Foundation of dock

22,736 57

41,360 89 64,097 46 Draining

13,341 97 20,461 49! 33,803 46 Excavation

2,744 76 50,827 57 53,572 33 Masonry of dock

248,972 83 201,816 79 450,789 62 Carpenier's shop

87 67 947 78 1,035 45 Superintendence

13,462 62 17,794 26 31,256 88 Turning gates

14,546 10

8,042 33 22,588 43 Banking up

1,745 72 9,693 00

11,438 72 Wells and tunnel

3,367 59 10,394 43

13,762 02 Great engine house

17,796 12
16,105 851

33,901 97 Great steam engine and pumps

26,271 68 1,673 54 27,915 22 Floating gate

11,103 19 13,018 35 24,121 54 Removing coffer dam

8,134 81

8,134 81 Total cost, to 31st Oct. 1833. $1 465,712 051 477,964 681 943,676 73

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NAVY PENSIO\ S. Number of Pensioners on the Nary Pension roll from each State, respec

tirely, other than those authorised to be placed upon it by the act of 28th June, 1832. Maine ............. 9 Maryland.....

23 Massachusetts

District of Columnbia .... 13 Rhode Island

Virginia

25 Connecticut

Ohio..........

2 New Hampshire

Kentucky....

1 New York...... 79 South Carolina.

2 New Jersey..

Louisiana .............

2 Pennsylvania

38
Missouri ...........

1 Delaware.................

2
Total..

277 Number of Pension ers on the Navy Pension roll under the act of 28th

June, 1832. Maine............... 1 District of Columbia........

1 Massachusetts ..... 2 Virginia ......

3 New York....

Georgia ......

1 Pennsylvania

3 Maryland.................. 1

Total.........

16 The number of pensioners under the act of 23d April, 1800, for long and faithful services, is, from New Jersey 1 ; Pennsylvania 2; Maryland 2. Making the whole number of pensioners on the roll 298.

The number of Pensioners ou the Privateer Pension roll is-From the State of Maine 3; Massachusetts 15; New York 9; Pennsylvania 1; Maryland 5. Whole number at this time on the roll 33.

An ACT for the relief of Widows and Orphans of the Officers and Seamen who were lost

in the United States' Schooner, the Sylph. [Approved, March 2, 1833.} Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, That, the widows, if any such there be, and in case there be no widow, the child or children, and if there be no child, then the parents or parent, and, if there be no parent, then the brothers and sisters, of the officers and seamen who were in the service of the United States, and lost in the schooner Sylph, shall be entitled to, and receive, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, a sum equal to six njonths' pay of their respeclive deceased relatives aforesaid, in addition to the pay due to the said deceased on the fifteenth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and Thirty-one, to which day the arrears of pay due the deceased shall be allowed and paid by the accounting officers of the Navy Department.

Officers and Crew of Sylph, Foundered at Bea, August 15, 1831.
H. E.V. Robinson, Lt. Commandings Samuel Abbott, Seaman............

!1m. C. Selden, acting Lieutenant John Maccabee, Seaman ..........
John A. Coyle, Midshipman....... John Bland, ordinary Seaman...
I.. W. P. Summers, Midshipman... Thomas Barrott, ordinary Seaman..
John Holmes, Seaman,

Charles Burrows, Boy....
William Barnes, Seaman........... Alfred Hearsey, Boy..............
Jobo Chears, Seaman............... James Bell, Cook
John H. Rosche, Seainan..........

An Act in addition to the Act for the gradual improvement of the Nary

of the United States. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representalives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, That for the gradual improvement of the Navy of the United States, the sum of five hundred thousand dollats, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, be, and the same is hereby appropriated, annually, for six years, from and after the third day of March, eighteen hundred and thirty-three, when tbe present appropriation expires.

SEC 2. And be it further enacted, That the President of the United States be, and he is hereby, autho.ized and empowered to cause the abovementioned appropriation to be applied, as directed aud prescribed by the act of the third of March, eighteen hundred and twenty-seven, to which this is in addition, the provisions whereof are hereby, continued in force for the term above mentioned, and to be applied also to the purchase of other necessary materials as well as timber suitable for the construction of vessels of war.

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That, in addition to the provisions now in force on the subject of the live oak growing on the public lands, it shall be the duty of all collectors of the customs within the Territory of Florida, and the States of Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, betore allowing a clearance to any vessel laden in whole or in part with live oak timbei, to-ascertain satisfactorily that such timber was cut from private lapis, or, if from public ones, by consent of the Navy Department. And it is hereby, 'made the duty of all officers of the customs, and of the land officers within said Territory and States, to cause prosecutions to be sea. sonably instituted against all persons known to be guilty of depredations on, or injuries to, the live oak growing on the public lands.

[ Approved March 2, 1833.] An act to amend an act entitled An act supplementary to the act for the

relief of certain surviving officers and soldiers of the revolution Be it enacted, &c. That the second section of the act entitled, “An act supplementary to the act for the relief of certain surviving officers and soldiers of the revolutioil,”'approved June 7, 1832, shall not be construed to embrace invalid pensioners; and that the pensions of invalid soldiers shall not be deducted from the amount receivable by them under the said act. (See Vol. XI. p. 232.) | Approved February 9, 1833.] A Resolution in relation to the execution of the act supplementary to the

" Act for the relief of certain surviving officers and soldiers of the Revolution." (Vol. XI. p. 232.) [.Approred March 2, 1833.]

Resolved, &c. That in the execution of ihe act supplementary to the “ Act for the relief of certain surviviog officers and soldiers of the Revolution," approved June 7, 1832, wherever it shall be marle to appear that any a pplicant for a pension under said ac, entered the army of the Revolution, in pursuance of a contract with the Government, mare previous to April 11, 1933, and continued in service until after that period, it shall be the duty of the secretary of War to compute the period of any such applicaut's service, from the time he then entered the army, and until the date lof the defi, itive treaty of peace, and to allow him a pension accordingly.

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vessels.

barracs.

Statement exhibiting the Amount expended during each year, from 1789 to 1831

under the following heads, on account of the Naval Establishment of the

United States, viz. I Pay Rations, and Clothing. II. Repairs of Vessels. III Contingent Expenses. IV. Building Ships, Preserving and Procuring Timber, Guns, and permanent

equipments ;-(including the whole expenditures un account of the

Navy up il 1801, inclusive.)
V. Marine Barracks, Docks, Rail' Ways, and Navy Yards.
Year.

V. Marine
I. Pay. &c.
II. Repairs of III. Contin- IV. Building
g't expenses.

ships, &c.
1791
1792
1793
1794

61,408 97 1795

410,562 03 1796

274.784 04 1797

382.631 89 1798

1,381,347 76 1799

2,858,081 84 1800

3,448,716 03 1801

2,032,276 42| 18,080 45 1802 594,499 40

12,550 00 240,575 00 54,004, 60 1803 521,672 64

191,461 00 501,694 96 401 93 1804 430,241 28

152,847 00 594,149 75 3,584 72 1805 742,494 98

| 420,370 02 434,635 00 1806 528,761 44

420,095 00 700,785 00 1807 644,802 18 333,093 28 83,145 00 661,024 01 1808 762,378 80 195,000 00 89,035 00 873,654 00 1809 1,582,758 30 595,000 00 190,000 00210,000 00 1810 1,207,453 801 270,790 40 105,000 00 70,000 00 1811 1,352,566 39| 450,000 00128,000 001 34,000 00 1812 1,591,502. 20 300,000 00185,000 00|1,882,359 95 1813 1,939, 100 10 700,000 00 328,000 00|3,479,500 00 1814 3,420,900 00 970,000 00810,000 00|2,110,390 60 1815 3,703,539 67 1,132,776 85 853,708 00 2,969,975 73 1816 1,894,223 00 300,000 00 460,000 00 1,254,055 30 1817 1,701,971 00 325,000 00350,000 00 928,627 49 1818 1,586,660 38 300,000 00 229,444 271 637,200 80210,389 55 1819 1,769,690 27 459,717 20 246,695 42 1,163,256 21209,281 32 1820 2,179,103 49 429,906 40191,971 671,331,360.71 255,647 73 1821 1,712,439 01 378,261 10 67,472 33 871,156 78 289,863 84 1822 1,597.046 99 146,556 92 102,511 95 376,249 95 1923 1,336,745 86 399,174 85 163,742 34 377,448 70111,938 90 1824 1,707,364 66 404,151 00|261,599 30 317,133 89 154,637 89 1825 1,731,082 81 388,164 78|276,128 73 492,922 58|125,606 74 1826 1,738,997 81 485,970 85 242,909 181,447,570 22/274,562 03 1827 2,223,946 63 417,365 55 251,084 501,079,959 60 257,548 55 1828 2,194,116 00 543,788 11 275,431 82 705,374 06 156,520 37 1829 1,974,514 62 470,945 68|277,605 14 411,527 24 152,852 49 1830 1,645,172 18 567,130 00 381,205. 35 493,567 25 130,434 41 1831 12.136,834 961 628,719 37|307,132 74 493,201 50 249,871 16

1,593 17

REPORT OF THE POS TMASTER GENERAL.

GENERAL Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT, Nov. 30, 1833 To the President of the United States :

Sir : When, in 1829, the functions of this department devolved upon me, the annual transportation of the mail amounted to 13,700,000 miles. The contracts then in existence, with the other expenses of the departo ment, had, withjo the year ending the 30th June, 1829, diminished its surplus revenue $101,256 03; and those contracts were still in force from one to four years in prospect.

The surplus available revenue had been reduced to the nominal amount of

$230,849 07 But it has subsequently been ascertained, that there had been expeuses incurred for transportation performed prior to the 1st July, 1829, which were not embraced in that account, to the amount of

64,248 76 Which reduced the real surplus to

8166 600 31 The annual transportation of the mail was, on the 1st July, 1833, 26,854,485 miles.

The annual amount of the transport ation of the mail in stages and steamboats, on the 1st of July, 1829, was 6,507,818 miles

The anaual amount of the transportation of the mail in stages and steamboats, on the 1st of July, 1833, was 18,322,676 miles.

The expense of transporting the mail for the year ending 30th June, 1829, was $1,153,646 21.

The expense of transporting the mail for the year ending 30th June, 1833, was $1,894,688 08.

The gross amount of postages constituting the revenues of the departnent, was, for the year ending 30th June, 1829, $1,707,418 42.•

The gross amount of postages for the year ending 30th June, 1933, was $2,616,538 27.

The incidental expenses of the department for the year ending 30th June, 1829, a mounted to 869,249 08.

The incidental expenses of the department for the year ending 30th June, 1833, amounted $87,701 61.

The number of post offices in the United States on the 1st of July, 1829, was 8,004.

On the 1st of July, 1833, the number of post offices in the United States was 10,127.

The increase of the annual transportation of the mail within the four years ending the 30th June, 1833, is 13,154,485 miles, nearly equal to the whole amount of transportation in 1829.

The increase of the annual amount of postages within the same period is $909,119 85, and the whole amount is more than the double of what it was in 1825.

The average expense of transporting the mail in 1829, was eight cents and four tenths of a cent per mile.

The average expense of transporting the mail in 1833, is seven cents and fifty-seven hundredths of a cent per mile; making a difference in the rate per mile, of eighty-three hundredths of a cent, equal, for the whole

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