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Now, let the reader try, by Mr Hume's test, the following sen. tences from the eighth Section of the Icon, relating to the execution of Sir J. Hotham (who refused to surrender Hull to the King) and his son, for treachery to the Parliament. “They (i. e. the Hothams) ! might have expected another reward from him, than thus to divide • their heads from their bodies, whose hearts were divided with them * from their King. '- The cutting off one head in a family, is not

enough to expiate the affront done to the Head of the Common'wealth. The eldest son must be involved in the punishment; as he . was infected with the sin of the father, against the father of his 6 country. Root and branch God cuts off in one day.' · Can there be a more perfect example of a bombast, rhetorical, and corrupt style ?

- To the note on the Sidney Papers, at pp. 47 and 48, the following addition should have been made. · Another Letter in the Sidney Collection, from Lord Spencer to Dorothy Sidney his lady, probably written in October 1642, shows still more clearly the licentious manners of Charles's Court, and the grossness of his own conversation. He (i. e. the King) was very * chearful ; and by the ***** discourse, I thought I had been in & the drawing-room.'-(Sidney Papers, 11. 668.) Even the civil war had not taught decency to the King and his Court. In the following year, Lord Spencer fell at the battle of Newbury, for the Royal cause.

In reference to the pretended anatomical discoveries of Gall and Spurzheim, alluded to at page 312, the following Note should have been added.

Those who wish to see this subject treated in a full, scientific, and satisfactory manner, are referred to a short but masterly work of the late lamented Dr Gordon, published in 1817, under the title of “ Observations on the Structure of the Brain, comprising an Esti. mate of the Claims of Drs Gall and Spurzheim to Discovery in the Anatomy of that Organ.”

In this admirable production, the author, we think, has clearly demonstrated, Ist, that the Phrenological Doctors have no sort of claim to originality, as to the far greater part of the anatomical facts they have held out as their discoveries; and, 2d, that all that is really original in their anatomy is quite unsound and erroneous, and founded either on the most idle conjectures, or on a mere trick in the manner of operation, scarcely reconcileable with the dignity of scientific investigation.

Since our Article on the Abolition of the Corn Laws was sent to press, * an Order in Council, dated the 1st of September, has ap: peared, authorizing the importation of oats, oatmeal, rye, peas and beans, until forty days after the meeting of Parliament. Oats are subject to a duty of 2s. a quarter, oatmeal to a duty of 2s, 6d. a boll, and rye, peas and beans, to a duty of 3s. 6d. a quarter. There can be no doubt, considering the extraordinary deficiency in the crop of oats, that the ports must have opened for their importation on the 15th of November. But ministers are, notwithstanding, most justly entitled to the public thanks, for having issued the Order in question ; for if the ports had been allowed to remain shut until the middle of November, it would have been no longer possible to make. any importations from the great Northern markets previously to the spring; and the means that might otherwise have been afforded for alleviating the pressure of the existing scarcity, must have been comparatively trilling.

The effects that have attended the free importation of oats, are precisely such as we anticipated. Qur prices gave way in the first instance; but they speedily rallied, and have been for some time on the advance. The prices of oats, oatmeal, &c. at Amsterdam, Hamburgh, and other markets contiguous to Great Britain, immediately advanced to near our level. :

* By an error of the press, the 10th of September is mentioned in the note to p. 340, instead of the 2d.

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INDEX.

Abolition of the Corn Laws, what quantity of foreign grain would be

introduced upon the, and what proportion it would bear to our annual
consumption, 325-proofs drawn from the experience of former years,
when the ports were open, 326—whether prices would be depressed
according to the rate supposed, by the, 327—-price at which corn
might be imported from Dantzic upon the, 328_-estimate of the aye-
rage price at which corn might be sold after the, 334-how farmers
and landlords would be affected by the, 335-pernicious fluctuations
in prices that must occur until the, 336-estimate of the pecuniary

sum that would be saved by the, 341-various advantages that would
· result from the, 345,
Acquisitiveness, whether a distinct and independent faculty, 271.
Administratives Maurs, character of the work entitled, 156. general

observations suggested by the work, 158-motives and denign of the

author in writing it, 162-forcible and lively extract from, 163,
Admiral Coligni, life of, when attempted, and by whom, 127.
Africa, Northern and Central, opening for the exploring of, where and
how furnished, 175—information gained by the expedition to, con-
cerning the nature of an Arab caravan merchant, 176_description of
an Arab chief, who was the protector of the mission to, 177-10
markable features of a desart of, 178_description of the lake Tehrad
in, 180—description of the kingdom of Bornou in, 183–in what mar
nufacture the Bornouese have attained some excellener, and what is
their intellectual condition, 185-attack upon the Felatah town
Dirkullah in, and by whom, 191—its unfortunate imkur, 192_isomi.
nent dangers encountered by Major Denham, the explorer o 192
account of the African men-traps, 195-deuriptions of the stana
Arabs, called Dugganahs, in, 199—arkount of the Founda ise, 2011
account of Sackatoo, capital of the Felatah empire, 212_pro

distinctions of the inhabitants of, 206.
Alhouses, Hoensing, diwadrantage of the prantíme, from *** *Wayang
monopoly, 443—instant of the surfquely thom pututa 444
benion of the practice of, write the more of the pop, 457- IV-
tian introduced by the custain , 449.

Alliance between Church and State, disadvantages attending the, 497.
Anjou, Duke of, privy to all the consultations that led to the massacre

of St Bartholomew, 102.
Arab caravan merchant, description of an, 176.

Bartholomew, St, massacre of, character of Dr John Lingard as an his
torian in relating the, 95—proofs of his inaccuracy in the narration of,
96_instances of carelessness in research in depicting the, 99— what
was the cause of the, according to Lingard, 100—fallacy of this view,
101_descriptions of the delight received by Charles from the, 105–
proofs of the general plan on which the, was perpetrated, 110—refu-
tation of the statement of Dr Lingard concerning the number of those
who perished in the, 112-actual number of those who perished in
the, 115—when the, was concerted, 118_instances of misrepresenta-
tion by Dr Lingard on the subject of the, 121_description of the
enormities of the, 125–-attempts to palliate its atrocities considered,

137.
Basilike, Icon, claims of Dr Gauden to be the author of, 10-letters of

Dr Gauden to Lord Clarendon, furnishing strong presumptive evidence
of his being the author of, 12-proof of Lord Clarendon's acquies-
cence in the claim of Dr Gauden to be the author of, 16—demon-
stration of the continued belief of Lord Clarendon that Dr Gauden
was the author of, 19_-silence of Lord Clarendon on the subject, a
proof that he believed Dr Gauden to be the author of, 21-refutation
of some arguments designed to show that Charles I. was the author

of the, 26--who were privy to Dr Gauden's composition of the, 30.
Bellievre, description by, of the massacre of St Bartholomew, 125.
Bernstorff, condition of Denmark under the administration of, 383.
Bilma, solitude of, in Africa, what kind of structure observed in, 179.
Bornou, kingdom of, described, 183_-population of, and what degree of

civilization prevails in, 1844 in what manufacture they have attained
some excellence, 185-physiognomy of the inhabitants of, ib.--whe-

ther destitute of speculative curiosity, 186.
Brain, in what sense the action of the, is essential to our mental opera-

tions, 257.
Britain, Great, how much the population of, has increased since 1800,

322.
Boo-Khaloom, protector of the Mission to Central Africa, account of,

177—visit of, to Bornou, 181-his reception at Bornou, 182—
ghrazzie, or slave-hunt, projected by, into the mountains of Mandara,
189—attack of, upon Dirkullah, i91-wounds received by, 192—

retreat of, from Dirkullah, 193-amiable traits in his character, 196.
Buonaparte, Napoleon, answer to his request for a passport to America,

and by whom, 386-letter of, and to whom, 387-his conduct in the
Bellerophon, 388--unworthy treatment of, by the British Govern-
ment, 391.

Trine of Medicis, character of, 134.

Captain Clapperton, visit of, to the country of the Felatahs, 201-de-

scription of the town of Kano by, 202-interview of, with Sultan

Bello, 203.
Captain Maitland, account of, with the character of his narrative, 385

-conversation of, with Captain Savary, 386-answer of, to a letter
from Buonaparte, 388_testimony of, to the unexceptionable de-
meanour of Buonaparte on board the Bellerophon, 389-passage of a

letter of, to Lord Keith, 390_his conduct to Napoleon, 394.
Central and Northern Africa, opening for the exploring of, where and

how furnished, 175-information gained by the expedition to, con-
cerning the nature of an Arab caravan merchant, 176_description of
an Arab chief, who was the protector of the Mission to, 177_re-
markable features of a desert of, 178_description of the lake Tchad
in, 180—description of the kingdom of Bornou in, 183–in what
manufacture the Bornouese have attained some excellence, and what
is their intellectual condition, 185-attack upon the Felatah town of
Dirkullah in, and by whom, 191—its unfortunate issue, 192_immi-
nent dangers encountered by Major Denham, the explorer of, 193–
account of the African men-traps, 195_description of the Shoua
Arabs, called Dugganahs, in, 199-account of the Felatahs in, 2014
account of Sackatoo, capital of the Felatah empire, 202_prominent

distinctions of the inhabitants of, 206.
Censurés, Spiritual, unlawfulness, and mischief of enforcing, by tempo-

ral pains and penalties, 492.
Charles II. of England, when and by whom his conversion to Catho-

licism first discovered, 24.
Charles IX., insincerity of, in his professions to the Hugonots, 131-

anecdotes concerning, 132.
Church of England, Letters on the, 49—what consequences would ensue
were its alliance with the State dissolved, 491-argument for the al-
liance of the, with the State, refuted, and by whom, 495-evils and

abuses of the, 502.
Clapperton, Captain, visit of, to the country of the Felatahs, 2012

description of the town of Kano, visited by, 202-interview of, with

Sultan Bello, 203.
Clarendon, Lord, letter of, to the Bishop of Exeter, 14-proof of the

acquiescence of, in the claim of Dr Gauden to be the author of the
Icon Basilike, 16-demonstration of his continued belief concerning
Gauden’s valid claim to be esteemed the author of the Icon Basilike,
19-his history when first correctly published, and by whom, 37-in-
stances of suppressed passages restored, 39.
Clarke, Rev. Edward Daniel, account of some of his ancestors, 220-

anecdotes concerning, 221_his residence at Cambridge University,

223-copious extracts from his descriptions, 228,
Coligni, Admiral, life of, when attempted, and by whom, 127.
Colour, whether perceived by the eye, 287.
Combe, George, character of his System of Phrenology, 253-extracts

from it, 274,

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