The Henriade,: An Epic Poem, in Ten Cantos. Translated from the French of Voltaire, Into English Rhyme, with Large Historical and Critical Notes, Volume 1

Front Cover
Burton and Company, 1797 - 227 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 196 - But the faithful fighters of this hour, or the beings that then and there will represent them, may then turn to the faint-hearted, who here decline to go on, with words like those with which Henry IV. greeted the tardy Crillon after a great victory had been gained: "Hang yourself, brave Crillon! We fought at Arques, and you were not there.
Page 1 - Descend, bright Truth! from Heaven's ethereal vault, Guide my weak pen, give vigour to my thought, Accustom kings thy warning voice to bear, 'Tis thine to dictate as 'tis theirs to hear ; 'Tis thine to bid contending nations know, " What dire effects from civil discord flow:" Tell how her standard on our plains she spread, How princes err'd, and hapless subjects bled.
Page 1 - tis theirs to hear; 'Tis thine to bid contending nations know, 'What dire effects from civil discord flow'. Tell how her standard on our plains she spread, How princes err'd, and hapless subjects bled. And, heavenly Truth ! if e'er thou did'st descend Thy voice with Fiction's silver sounds to blend; If e'er that lofty forehead stoop'd to wear The flow'ry wreath her graceful hands prepare; If from her shade thy lustre brighter shine, Let her with me her magic garland twine, And lend what sportive...
Page 24 - The duke, nettled at the affront put on his fine beard, said to the king, ' Sir, when your father, of glorious memory, did me the honour to consult me on his great and important affairs, the first thing he did was to send away all the buffoons and stage-dancers of his court.
Page 170 - The King of France does not avenge the injuries of the Duke of Orleans," he may have been entirely ignorant that he had been anticipated by Philip, Count of Bresse, who said, when he became Duke of Savoy in 1497, " It would be shameful as duke to avenge the injuries of the count." Christina of Sweden may have said of Louis XIV. when he revoked the Edict of Nantes,
Page 60 - Immediately he made the father and the children go down stairs, bareheaded and without their cloaks. La Force plainly saw that they were leading him to death : he followed Coconas, praying him to spare his two innocent children. The younger (aged thirteen years...
Page 104 - ... you dare, Hear what the people, what your lords declare : Their rights were known, ere man a sov'reign knew, Or earth was curs'd with such a race as you. That people you've abus'd, no longer tame, Their rights, their long-lost, sacred rights proclaim ; Crush'd be the sceptre that our tyrants bore, The pow'r, which we disown, is pow'r no more. Drop that vain title, hateful to our ear, That name of sov'reign, all men hate and fear ; Judge in the people's name, and let your court The nation's pow'r,...
Page 103 - And prey upon the troubles of mankind : Whose purchas'd titles are but shame's record, Of faction and cabal the mean reward ; Cowards in danger, tyrants where you dare, Hear what the people, what your lords declare : Their rights were known, ere man a sov'reign knew, Or earth was curs'd with such a race as you. That people you've abus'd, no longer tame, Their rights, their long-lost, sacred rights proclaim ; Crush'd be the sceptre that our tyrants bore, The pow'r, which we disown, is pow'r no more....
Page 103 - Biissy at their head, Shameless upon their awful presence broke, And thus, in threat'ning sounds, insulting spoke : " Ye vile, plebeian, mercenary tribe, Whose low-born pride to monarchs dares prescribe ; Whose trade it is, law's endless maze to wind...
Page 1 - By glorious conqueft, as by birth, a king ; Who from misfortune learn'da monarch's care...

Bibliographic information