The Winter-bloom

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Henry D. Moore
Hogan & Thompson, 1850 - 240 páginas

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Página 20 - I BRING fresh showers for the thirsting flowers, From the seas and the streams; I bear light shade for the leaves when laid In their noonday dreams. From my wings are shaken the dews that waken The sweet buds every one, When rocked to rest on their mother's breast, As she dances about the sun. I wield the flail of the lashing hail, And whiten the green plains under, And then again I dissolve it in rain, And laugh as I pass in thunder.
Página 20 - I know not how thy joy we ever should come near. Better than all measures Of delightful sound, Better than all treasures That in books are found, Thy skill to poet were, thou scorner of the ground ! Teach me half the gladness That thy brain must know, Such harmonious madness From my lips would flow The world should listen then — as I am listening now.
Página 18 - O Adam, One Almighty is, from Whom All things proceed, and up to Him return, If not depraved from good, created all Such to perfection, one first matter all, Endued with various forms, various degrees Of substance, and in things that live, of life...
Página 109 - WE are as clouds that veil the midnight moon : How restlessly they speed, and gleam, and quiver, Streaking the darkness radiantly! — yet soon Night closes round, and they are lost for ever: Or like forgotten lyres, whose dissonant strings Give various response to each varying blast, To whose frail frame no second motion brings One mood or modulation like the last.
Página 19 - HAIL to thee, blithe spirit ! Bird thou never wert, That from heaven, or near it, Pourest thy full heart In profuse strains of unpremeditated art. Higher still and higher From the earth thou springest Like a cloud of fire; The blue deep thou wingest, And singing still dost soar, and soaring ever singest.
Página 75 - Shechem said unto her father and unto her brethren, Let me find grace in your eyes, and what ye shall say unto me I will give. 12 Ask me never so much dowry and gift, and I will give according as yc shall say unto me: but give me the damsel to wife.
Página 147 - To chase these pagans in those holy fields Over whose acres walk'd those blessed feet Which fourteen hundred years ago were nail'd For our advantage on the bitter cross.
Página 103 - Doomed o'er the world's precarious scene to sweep, Swift as the tempest travels on the deep, To know Delight but by her parting smile, And toil, and wish, and weep a little while ; Then melt, ye elements, that formed in vain This troubled pulse, and visionary brain ! Fade, ye wild flowers, memorials of my doom, And sink, ye stars, that light me to the tomb...
Página 103 - This frail and feverish being of an hour; Doomed o'er the world's precarious scene to sweep, Swift as the tempest travels on the deep, To know Delight but by her parting smile, And toil, and wish, and weep a little while ; Then melt, ye elements, that formed in vain This troubled pulse, and visionary brain!
Página 109 - Give various response to each varying blast, To whose frail frame no second motion brings One mood or modulation like the last. We rest. A dream has power to poison sleep; We rise. One wandering thought pollutes the day; We feel, conceive or reason, laugh or wee'p ; Embrace fond woe or cast our cares away : It is the same ! For, be it joy or sorrow, The path of its departure still is free : Man's yesterday may ne'er be like his morrow; Naught may endure but Mutability.

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