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Interior view, Palace of Education. To the right is the New York State education exhibit. Directly in the center is the Bureau of Education space,

the hooded device being the temporary stage from which the Hampton jubilee singers sang. The “ beehive” on the left is Utah. At the rear is the American Library Association exhibit, with the map of California illustrating the county library plan.

I. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. . The United States Government exhibits at the exposition were scattered over seven of the main exhibit buildings. In the Palace of Education the Government exhibit of education, including displays by the Bureau of Education, agricultural colleges, and public schools of the City of Washington, occupied a large central location. The Children's Bureau exhibit, also in the Palace of Education and Social Economy, bore directly on school problems, and in the Liberal Arts Building were the exhibits of the Public Health Service, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Military Academy at West Point, and the Naval Academy at Annapolis.

BUREAU OF EDUCATION.

The Bureau of Education exhibit was designed to show the organization of the Bureau of Education for the purpose of educational

1913

High Schools

....13.445

...67.092 .J.283009

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PUBLIC
EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES

PROGRESS SINCE 1877
1877
1913

1877
Total Population Estimated... 146.112.700...97.163.330
School Population Stol8 Estimated. 14.025.800 ..25499928 Institutions ..

..1340
Public Schools

Teachers.

.6.759
Enrollment of Pupils.. -8.965006 18.523558 Students.

_98.485
Average Daily Attendance. .5426.595 _13.510.643 Normal Schools
Teachers

152

Institutions
Male.
114.312 113.342 Teachers

1.189
Female.
152738 451.118 Students

27.765
Total.

.267050 564460 Universities and Colleges Value of School Property. . $198.554.584 $1345/16371 Institutions.....

.433 Expenditure for Instruction $ 54973.776 $ 303.537.849 | Professors and Instructors. -4865 Total Expenditure.. $ 79439826 $ 534058.580 Students..

66737 Average Number of Days

Schools of MedicineLaw&Theology
in School Year

...1334
.1580 Institutions

249
Professors and Instructors ..1799
Students.....

16.422

284 4897 .94.455

596 .19858 202231

....411 J0019 ..49081

Bureau of Education chart showing educational progress since 1877.

investigation, information, policy, and promotion, and to portray educational progress since previous expositions through charts, models, pictures, maps, etc.

Progress in education since 1877, the year following the first national exposition, was shown in a large chart. Particularly impressive was the growth of high schools.

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Chart illustrating kindergarten work of the National Kindergarten Association and the Bureau of Education.

Modern types of rural schools and processes of education were shown in the exhibit by a series of models and devices. These illustrated, respectively, the rural school in connection with the State Normal School at Kirksville, Mo.; the Cache La Poudre School, of Colorado; the model rural school at the State Normal School, Maysville, N. Dak.; the Farragut School, Tennessee; the rural consolidated school at Alberta, Minn.; a practical ideal for a consolidated school district; and the progress of school children through the grades.

The model of the rural school at Kirksville demonstrated how a country school can be, “not a one-room school, but a one-teacher school.” The model was so constructed that it could be easily taken apart to show the arrangement of rooms, apparatus, and other special features. Particularly impressive was the use of all available space in basement and attic; the modern improvements possible in any country school; and the opportunities for industrial work, agriculture, and social center activities. The cost of construction, without plumbing and heating, was declared to be $2,200; with sanitary plumbing and hot-water heat, $2,750; with all equipment, $3,200.

The Cache La Poudre School illustrated particularly the community extension efforts of the Colorado Agricultural College at Fort Collins. It showed a modern high-school building set in a rural community with a “teacherage” on the school grounds, a school barn and liberal school grounds, a school farm of 5 acres, garden land of 1 acre, an athletic field of 2 acres, and an orchard of half an acre. The school serves an area of 15 square miles, containing 207 homes and a population of 800 people. The Colorado Agricultural College explains that, in behalf of “community betterment through rural school consolidation, we are working in Colorado”—

To improve all of our village and rural schools.
To secure the county unit of rural-school administration.
To provide adequate trained supervision.
To provide a school farm for each rural teacher.
To provide a house for the principal and make possible a resident teacher,
To encourage lecture courses and neighborhood meetings in all districts.
To make each school a social center for all the people.
To introduce agriculture and the home arts into all the schools.
To make a high-school education possible for every country chilil.
To train teachers for rural schools and rural leadership.
To consolidate our small, weak districts into large, strong ones.

The Farragut School was presented as a typical Tennessee countrylife school. The school has 100 pupils in its elementary course and 100 in its high-school course. The courses include agriculture, carpentry, household science, rural sanitation, and regular academic work “taught with an agricultural halo.” There is a residence for the principal on the grounds, a remodeled abandoned schoolhouse.

SPEND OF THE TIME IN SCHOOL

%

AND
GUIDANCE

FOR

VOCATIONS
PARENTHOOD
CITIZENSHIP
IDE ALS
CULTURE
CHARACTER
LIFE

HOME EDUCATION DIVISION IN COOPERATION WITH NATIONAL CONGRESS OF MOTHERS 13,000,000 CHILDREN

20,000,000
18,000,000 CHILDREN

BOYS AND GIRLS
UNDER 6 YEARS OF AGE IN

K OF THEIR TIME IN SCHOOL

YOUNG MEN AND YOUNG WOMEN

ENCOURAGEMENT
AMERICAN HOMES

THEIR TIME AT HOME

NEED

IN CONTINUING THEIR
These years before school are most im-
portant for life, health and right beginnings

HOME AND SCHOOL EDUCATION
of all forms of

MUST

AFTER SCHOOL
EDUCATION

COOPERATE
THE

FOR FULLEST AND BEST RESULTS FROM THE
HOME EDUCATION EDUCATIONAL INFLUENCES

OF BOTH
DIVISION

HOME EDUCATION DIVISION
HELPS

HOME EDUCATION DIVISION BUREAU OF EDUCATION
BUREAU OF EDUCATION

COOPERATION WITH STATES.

TEACHERS TO KNOW THE HOMES OFFERS
STIMULATING BEGINNINGS OF

PARENTS TO KNOW THE SCHOOLS
THEIR INTELLECTUAL LIFE

PARENTS AND TEACHERS TO CAREFULLY SELECTED READING COURSES
COOPERATE FOR THE EDUCATION

DIRECTIONS FOR READING

OF THE CHILDREN
IN

PARENTS TO STUDY CHILD

AND HOME MAKING COURSES
WORKS THROUGH

NOW
THOUSANDS OF PARENT - TEACHER ASSOCIATIONS | OFFERED

40000 ASSISTANTS

ESTABLISHING HEALTH AND
RIGHT HEALTH HABITS

PARENTS

HELPS

DIRECTING FORMATION OF
THEIR MORAL HABITS
GUIDING THEIR EMOTIONS
IN RIGHT CHANNELS
CHOOSING THEIR WORK
AND PLAY
MAKING THEIR CHILDHOOD
JOYOUS AND MAPPY

1 LITERARY BIBLES
2 WORLDS GREAT LITERATURE
3 HOME MAKING AND CARE OF YOUNG CHILDREN
4 MISCELLANEOUS READING FOR BOYS
S MISCELLANEOUS READNG FOR GIRLS
6 GREAT FICTION
7 WORLDS HEROES
8 BIOGRAPHY
9 HISTORY

Chart illustrating work of the Home Education Division of the Bureau of Education and the National Congress of Mothers.

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