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Map of Alaska superimposed upon the l’nited States. From the exhibit of the t'nited States Alaskan school service.

A chart describing educational foundations gave the following information:

Educational foundations.

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('arnegie Foundation..
Carnegie Corporation....
Rockefeller Foundation.
General Education Board.
Russell Sage Foundation.
Rockefeller Institute.
Carnegie Institution..
Smithsonian Institution.
Phelps-Stokes Fund.
Jeanes Fund.
Slater Fund.
Hand Fund.

$16,250,000 Retiring allowances for teachers and officers of col

leges, United States and Canada. 125,000,000 Advancement and diffusion of knowledge and

understanding. 100,000,000 The well-being of mankind throughout the world. 34, 139, 156 Education in the United States. 10,000,000 | Improvement of social and living conditions in the

United States. 12, 467,173 Medical research. Diseases in men and animals. 22,000,000 Investigation, research, and discovery. 1,002,500 The increase and diffusion of knowledge. 1,000,000 Educational aid for belated races. 1,000,000 Improvement of country schools for colored chil

dren. 1,745,000 Normal and industrial training in colored schools. 1,511,855 Education of people of African descent.

The printed publications shown in the exhibit included the annual reports of the Commissioner of Education, issued since 1868, and the bulletins of the Bureau of Education, of which 160 were issued in the three years preceding December, 1915.

Other printed matter on exhibition included: (1) Student annuals, or similar publications of the leading universities, colleges, and normal schools of the United States; (2) the 6-foot shelf of home reading courses offered by the Bureau of Education; (3) bound volumes of the principal educational surveys conducted in this country in recent years; (4) a model country-school library for California schools.

CHILDREN'S BUREAU.

The Children's Bureau exhibit as a whole was educational in the larger sense, and certain features of it had direct reference to school problems. A moving panorama, “Our 30,000,000 children,” attempted to show where children were at each year of life. Of about two and a half million children born every year, 300,000 die before they are 1 year old, according to the exhibit. In the seventh year 52 per cent of the children are in school; in the eighth year, 75 per cent; in the ninth, 83 per cent; in the tenth, 86 per cent; in the twelfth, 91 per cent; in the thirteenth, 90 per cent; in the fourteenth, 89 per cent; and in the fifteenth year 81 per cent are in school.

Attractive charts emphasized the need for playgrounds, especially play spaces for younger children.

Models of a sanitary dairy and an insanitary dairy shown were of special interest, because they were made by the girls' class in sanitation of the Pasadena (Cal.) High School.

LIBRARIES

LIBRARIES SUPPORT TAXATION

· 1913

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21
42
17
136
103
278

98
1416

29

21

SA
26

21
44
95
75
88

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STATE
ALABAMA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUMBIA
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO, , "
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
UNITED STATES

12

26
174
120
259
07
86
16
70
BI

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LIBRARIES OF 1000 VOLUMES AND OVER
STATE 1913

LBRARIES VOLUMES
ALABAMA

69

462297 ARIZONA

18

96766
ARKANSAS

41

278000 CALIFORNIA

538 3626618 COLORADO

910958 CONNECTICUT

249 3279705 DELAWARE

14

204072 DIST. OF COLUMBIA

86 4929527 FLORIDA

24

117486 GEORGIA

89

564053
IDAHO

36 164901
ILLINOIS

474 5605891
INDIANA

252 2012669
IOWA

306 1959642
KANSAS

197 1251458
KENTUCKY

X2

755029
LOUISIANA

46

162174
MAINE

190

1315211
MARYLAND

85

1602422 MASSACHUSETTS

626 10596707 MICHIGAN

295 2565648 MINNESOTA

278

1877740
MISSISSIPPI

42

278582
MISSOURI

212 2331 786
MONTANA

47

341225 NEBRASKA

120

831687
NEVADA

10

116841
NEW HAMPSHIRE

212 1344522
NEW JERSEY

2481082
NEW MEXICO

20

84807 NEW YORK

1037 13308082 NORTH CAROLINA

85

576785
NORTH DAKOTA

73 296811
OHIO

363 4488228 OKLAHOMA

69

278072
OREGON

69

534451
PENNSYLVANIA

446 6112381
RHODE ISLAND

87 1269135
SOUTH CAROLINA

396068
SOUTH DAKOTA

77

309727 TENNESSEE

77

728637
TEXAS

149

821434
UTAH

33 208635
VERMONT

139

782961
VIRGINIA

71

724187
WASHINGTON

105 732864
WEST VIRGINIA

48

304842
WISCONSIN

322 2327225
• WYOMING

18

152516 UNITED STATES

8302 86802877

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VOLUMES PER 100 PEOPLE
STATE

1875 1003
ALABAMA

12
ARIZONA

13

22
ARKANSAS

1
CALIFORNIA

42 133
COLORADO

12
CONNECTICUT

68
DELAWARE

31

72
DIST. OF COLUMBIA

508 919
FLORIDA

16
GEORGIA
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS

46
KENTUCKY

26
LOUISIANA

15

26
MAINE

131
MARYLAND

43

103
MASSACHUSETTS

129

263
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI

12
MISSOURI

37
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK

112
NORTH CAROLINA

19
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAM
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING

22

62
UNITED STATES

69

7

213

27
18
2
87
1
2

23

1

15

14

5

219

8

65

20
5
17
5
60

4 1546

B

32

2
814

96
93
80

249

Comparative growth of libraries in the various States, as shown in the Government education exhibit. Children's health conference in the exhibit of the Children's Bureau.

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Extensive space was given in the exhibit to charts impressing upon mothers simple directions for the care of their children, and a feature of the exhibit was the children's clinic, to which children of all ages, but especially very young children, were brought daily for examination.

PUBLIC IIEALTH SERVICE.

Models of an insanitary and a sanitary country school were shown in the United States Public Health Service exhibit in the Liberal Arts Building. The insanitary school, which bore the date “A. D. 1890,” was described as follows:

In the erection of this building no attention was paid to proper lighting or sanitary environment. The surface privy pollutes the soil, increasing the danger of infection by hookworm and other intestinal parasites. These breed in the manure in the horse shed and may transmit typhoid fever. The well is su located that surface drainage from the privy and stable may contaminate the water supply. No provision is made for physical exercise. The lack of individual drinking cups favors the transmission of disease.

The sanitary country school, dated "A. D. 1914," was intended to fit the following requirements:

This school building was constructed with a view to proper lighting and ventilation. The privy is of the type known as the L. R. S. privy. The horse shed is kept clean, and the manure is in a covered bin to prevent fly breeding. The water supply is from a driven well, incased with concrete cap, to prevent contamination by surface drainage. There are no roof gutters except over doors, and the surrounding ground is drained so that there may be no breeding places for mosquitoes. A playground and school garden are provided. Each child is required to have an individual drinking cup.

BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

Industrial work was emphasized in the Indian schools' exhibit in the Palace of Liberal Arts. Blankets, basket work, and admirable examples of art furnishings were shown. All the furniture used in the exhibit space was “made by Indian student apprentices while at work in the different shops of the schools." A model, one-seventh size, of the domestic science cottage at the United States Indian school at Mount Pleasant, Mich., indicated the importance assigned to practical domestic science work in the Indian schools. The model was constructed by male students of the institution. Stereomotograph slides depicted life and work in the Government Indian schools.

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