English Mechanic and World of Science: With which are Incorporated "the Mechanic", "Scientific Opinion," and the "British and Foreign Mechanic.", Volumen32

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E. J. Kibblewhite, 1881
 

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Página 105 - The first is, that neither the discipline nor the subject-matter of classical education is of such direct value to the student of physical science as to justify the expenditure of valuable time upon either ; and the second is, that, for the purpose of attaining real culture, an exclusively scientific education is at least as effectual as an exclusively literary education.
Página 105 - I am the last person to question the importance of genuine literary education, or to suppose that intellectual culture can be complete without it. An exclusively scientific training will bring about a mental twist as surely as an exclusively literary training.
Página 105 - ... but in one particular form of literature, namely, that of Greek and Roman antiquity. They hold that the man who has learned Latin and Greek, however little, is educated; while he who is versed in other branches of knowledge, however deeply, is a more or less respectable specialist, not admissible into the cultured caste. The stamp of the educated man, the University degree, is not for him.
Página 106 - ... which we give that name are not touched by any amount of instruction. But it does not follow that even mere intellectual education may not, to an indefinite extent, modify the practical manifestation of the characters of men in their actions, by supplying them with motives unknown to the ignorant. A pleasure-loving character will have pleasure of some...
Página 105 - But for those who mean to make science their serious occupation ; or who intend to follow the profession of medicine ; or who have to enter early upon the business of life ; for all these, in my opinion, classical education is a mistake ; and it is for this reason that I am glad to see " mere literary education and instruction...
Página 105 - And, as to the desirableness of a wider culture than that yielded by science alone, it is to be recollected that the improvement of manufacturing processes is only one of the conditions which contribute to the prosperity of industry. Industry is a means and not an end ; and mankind work only to get something which they want. What that something is depends partly on their innate, and partly on their acquired, desires. If the...
Página 105 - Virgil and Horace, give it to him. Thus, since the constitution of the College makes sufficient provision for literary as well as for scientific education, and since artistic instruction is also contemplated, it seems to me that a fairly complete culture is offered to all who are willing to take advantage of it.
Página 105 - But for us now, continues Professor Huxley, "the notions of the beginning and the end of the world entertained by our forefathers are no longer credible. It is very certain that the earth is not the chief body in the material universe, and that the world is not subordinated to man's use. It is even more certain that nature is the expression of a definite order, with which nothing interferes.
Página 105 - ... science is nothing but the application of pure science to particular classes of problems. It consists of deductions from those general principles, established by reasoning and observation, which constitute pure science. No one can safely make these deductions until he has a firm grasp of the principles ; and he can obtain that grasp only by personal experience of the operations of observation and of reasoning on which they are founded.
Página 105 - I find myself wholly unable to admit that either nations or individuals will really advance, if their common outfit draws nothing from the stores of physical science. I should say that an army, without weapons of precision, and with no particular base of operations, might more hopefully enter upon a campaign on the Rhine, than a man, devoid of a knowledge of what physical science has done in the last century, upon a criticism of life.

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