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PARAGRAPH 515-CRUDE BONES.

We have been obliged to relinquish almost entirely the manufacturing of white beeswax of late, and we are fully advised that the present tariff conditions have proved as disastrous to each similar industry in this country.

It is a matter of frequent record that our home supply of raw beeswax is shipped to Europe and returned to us in the bleached and manufactured state.

We hope we have made clear the difference between the raw and natural beeswax and the white manufactured article. The precarious position of the American manufacturer under such conditions is plainly very evident, and we are making this urgent appeal to your esteemed consideration. We would suggest most respectfully that a tariff taxation of at least 20 per cent per pound on the foreign importation of white beeswax would not be an excessive duty but would afford the American manufacturer a small reasonable profit and enable him to compete under somewhat more equal conditions with the German bleacher. We trust we may be favored with your further courteous attitude and that some definite legislative action will follow in the near future.

We would value very highly any communication from you inquiring for any details or information you may wish to know in regard to this matter. Yours, very truly,

E. A. BROMUND & Co.

J. PARAGRAPH 507.

Binding twine: All binding twine manufactured from New Zealand hemp, manila, istle or Tampico fiber, sisal grass, or sunn, or a mixture of any two or more of them, of single ply and measuring not exceeding six hundred feet to the pound: Provided, That articles mentioned in this paragraph, if imported from a country which lays an import duty on like articles imported from the United States, shall be subject to a duty of one-half of one cent per

pound. PARAGRAPH 508.

Bells, broken, and bell metal broken and fit only to be remanufactured. PARAGRAPH 509.

Birds, stuffed, not suitable for millinery ornaments. PARAGRAPH 510.

Birds and land and water fowls. PARAGRAPH 511.

Bismuth. PARAGRAPH 512.

Bladders, and all integuments, tendons, and intestines of animals and fish sounds, crude, dried or salted for preservation only, and unmanufactured,

not specially provided for in this section. PARAGRAPH 513.

Blood, dried, not specially provided for in this section. PARAGRAPH 514.

Bolting cloths composed of silk, imported expressly for milling purposes,

and so permanently marked as not to be available for any other use. PARAGRAPH 515.

Bones, crude, or not burned, calcined, ground, steamed, or otherwise manufactured, and bone dust or animal carbon, and bone ash, fit only for fertilizing purposes.

CRUDE BONES.

SUGGESTIONS FOR CHANGES IN PARAGRAPH 515.

HOBOKEN, N. J., February 14, 1913. Hon. OSCAR W. UNDERWOOD, Chairman Committee on Ways and Means,

United States House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. Dear Sir: In reply to your notice on tariff hearings dated December 11, 1912, which has just come to our attention, we beg to respectfully submit the following:

PARAGRAPH 516—CRUDE BONES. Schedule Apar. No. 45).-Present duty 25 per centum ad valorem, strike out the word "bone" in the first line, and strike out the words "bone black and" in the second line.

Schedule N, free list (par. No. 515).-Strike out the words "or not burned" and substitute in place of same the word “burned.” Strike out the words “or otherwise manuiactured.” Strike out the words "Fit only for fertilizing purposes.”,

So that this paragraph shall read "Bones, crude, burned, calcined, ground, steamed, and bone dust, or animal carbon, and bone ash."

This company produces phosphoric acid. It is not identified with any other concern, either by association, price understanding, or any other manner. Phosphoric acid is now on the free list under the tariff act of August 5, 1909, Schedule N, paragraph No. 482. We do not ask for a duty on this commodity. We submit, however, that the raw material from which same is produced should be admitted free of duty.

Our production of phosphoric acid enters as a chief component part of acid phosphate, an element for baking powder, used for food preparation purposes. The essential raw material is bone, principally in burned form as bone black or animal carbon. Likewise, it very largely enters into the production of fertilizer, or manure, for agricultural purposes. The American supply of bone is practically exhausted and the demand for bone black for the above-mentioned purposes is largely in excess of the domestic production, and the price of bone black, both new or virgin and spent bone black has greatly advanced during the past four years. We submit, therefore, that bones of all deszciption and bone black, or animal carbon, either new or spent, should be admitted free of duty. Very respectfully,

R. B. Davis Co.

BRIEF OF ALEX. HOLTHUSEN, NEW YORK, N. Y.

New YORK, March 25, 1912. The CHAIRMAN OF THE HOUSE WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE,

Washington, D. C. DEAR SIR: I beg leave to state that I am an importer of crude bones which, until the 21st of August last year, I was permitted to bring in here free of duty; since then a duty of 10 per cent is levied on same. According to inquiries made by the Treasury Department with reference to a shipment I brought into Philadelphia in March, 1910, it was established that the bones had been boiled some hours after the knuckles were cut off and afterwards dried in the sun, which bleaches the article and makes the bones white.

The desirable bones are the round and flat shin bones taken from the fore and hind feet of the cattle. Of this kind there are not enough to go around and the price in this country has risen about 50 per cent within 10 years. I export a few hundred tons of thigh bones during a year, which our home manufacturers do not find profitable to cut up.

The countries they are shipped to let them come in free of duty. In the revision of the tariff I beg that bones not manufactured into any article will be put on the free list. A duty of 10 per cent is nearly prohibitory. Very respectfully,

ALEX. HOLTHUSEN.

PARAGRAPH 516.

Books, engravings, photographs, etchings, bound or unbound, maps and charts imported by authority or for the use of the United States or for the use

of the Library of Congress. PARAGRAPH 517.

Books, maps, music, engravings, photographs, etchings, bound or unbound, and charts, which shall have been printed more than twenty years at the date of importation, and all hydrographic charts, and publications issued for their subscribers or exchanges by scientific literary associations or academies, or publications of individuals for gratuitous private circulation, and public documents issued by foreign governments.

PARAGRAPHS 516-520-BOOKS, PHOTOGRAPHS, ETC.

PARAGRAPH 518.

Books and pamphlets printed chiefly in languages other than English;

also books and music, in raised print, used exclusively by the blind. PARAGRAPH 519.

Books, maps, music, photographs, etchings, lithographic prints, and charts, specially imported, not more than two copies in any one invoice, in good faith, for the use and by order of any society or institution incorporated or established solely for religious, philosophical, educational, scientific, or literary purposes, or for the encouragement of the fine arts, or for the use and by order of any college, academy, school, or seminary of learning in the United States, or any State or public library, and not for sale, subject to such regulations as the

Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe. PARAGRAPH 520.

Books, libraries, usual and reasonable furniture, and similar household effects of persons or families from foreign countries, all the foregoing if actually used abroad by them not less than one year, and not intended for any other person or persons, nor for sale.

BOOKS, PHOTOGRAPHS, ETC.

SUGGESTIONS OF FRANCIS E. HAMILTON, NEW YORK, N. Y.

(Free list. Pars. 517, 519 650, 714, 715.]

WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE.

GENTLEMEN: On behalf of the great public art and educational institutions of the country, I submit the following suggested substitute for paragraphs 517, 519, 650, 714, and 715. Respectfully,

FRANCIS E. HAMILTON.

SUBSTITUTE FOR SECTIONS 517, 519, 650, 714, 715.

Books, maps, music, engravings, photographs, etchings, bound or unbound, and charts, which shall have been printed more than 20 years at the date of importation, and all hydrographic charts, and publications issued for their subscribers or exchanges by scientific and literary associations or academies, or publications of individuals for gratuitous private circulation, and public documents issued by foreign Governments; also books, maps, music, photographs, etchings, lithographic prints, and charts, specially imported, not more than two copies in any one invoice, in good faith, for the use and by order of any society or institution incorporated or established solely for religious, philosophical, educational, scientific, or literary purposes, or for the encouragement of the fine arts, or for the use and by order of any college, academy, school, or seminary of learning in the United States, or any State or public library; also philosophical and scientific apparatus, utensils, instruments

, and preparations, including bottles and boxes containing the same, specially imported in good faith for the use and by order of any society or institution incorporated or established solely for religious, philosophical, educational, scientific, or literary purposes, or for the encouragement of the fine arts, or for the use and by order of any college, academy, school, or seminary of learning in the United States, or any State or public library; also works of art, drawings, engravings, photographic pictures, and philosophical and scientific apparatus for use temporarily for exhibition and in illustration, promotion, and encouragement of art, science, or industry in the United States; also works of art, collections in illustration of the progress of the arts, sciences, or manufactures, photographs, works in terra cotta, parian, pottery, or porcelain, antiquities and artistic copies thereof in metal or other material, imported in good faith for exhibition at a fixed place by any State or by any society or institution established for the encouragement of the arts, science, or education, or for a municipal corporation, and all like articles imported in good faith by any society or association, or for a municipal corporation for the purpose of erecting a public monument. Any and all of the above imported in good faith only for the purposes mentioned and not for sale, shall be admitted free of duty upon oath from any authorized officer of the society, instituPARAGRAPHS 516-520-BOOKS, PHOTOGRAPHS, ETC. tion, college, academy, school, seminary of learning, corporation, association, and without bond, under regulations to be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury: Prorided, That the privileges of this and the preceding section shall not be allowed to associations or corporations engaged in or connected with business of a private or commercial character.

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MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS,

Boston, Mass., January 27, 1913. FRANCIS E. HAMILTON, Esq.,

32 Broadway, New York City. DEAR SIR: We have examined your proposed substitute for sections 517, 519, 650, 714, and 715 of the tariff regulations and would be happy to have you refer to us as indorsing the proposed change. Hoping you may be successful in securing these alterations in the regulations, I am, Yours, very truly,

MORRIS CARTER, Assistant Director.

THE BUFFALO FINE ARTS ACADEMY,

ALBRIGHT ART GALLERY,

January 25, 1913. FRANCIS E. HAMILTON, Esq.,

32 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. DEAR Mr. HAMILTON: I most heartily do approve of the new paragraph substituting for the old ones, 517, 519, 650, 714, and 715, and I do hope with all my heart that the authorities will see fit to change and allow this one to go into action. The works of art which we import for our museum from the other side are simply for the education of the American people, and it does seem as though the customs ought to be willing to help us, as this work is such a great one.

I trust you will be able to pass this amendment and waiting anxiously to hear from you again and thanking you for calling my attention to it, I remain, Very sincerely, yours,

Cornelia B. Sage, Director.

THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO,

January 25, 1913. Mr. FRANCIS E. HAMILTON,

32 Broadway, New York, N. Y.
DEAR Sır: I hasten to reply to your letter of January 24.
I very heartily approve of the proposed paragraph of the tariff act which you inclose.
It would be an immense relief to the art museums if it were adopted, and no possible
damage could be done to anybody.

There will be a stated meeting of our trustees next Thursday, January 30, and I
will submit the subject for an official expression, which I hope may not be too late
to be of service.
Yours, very truly,

Wm. M. R. FRENCH, Director.
P. S.-I notice the expression “boxes and bottles containing the same.” Would
it not be well to specify the frames belonging to pictures? They now tax them
separately.

THE CENTRAL MUSEUM,

Brooklyn, N. Y., January 27, 1913. FRANCIS E. HAMILTON, Esq.,

S2 Broadway, Manhattan, N. Y. DEAR SIR: Any procedure which will relieve our museum of the inconvenience and expense attached to the importation of educational material through the customhouse is most acceptable to this institution. I therefore heartily approve of the proposed substitute for sections 517, 519, 650, 714, and 715, and trust you will be successful in having it accepted by the Ways and Means Committee of Congress. Very truly, yours,

W. II. Fox.

PARAGRAPH 616-520-BOOKS, PHOTOGRAPHS, ETC.

CARNEGIE INSTITUTE,

Pittsburgh, Pa., January 28, 1913. FRANCIS E. HAMILTON, Esq.,

32 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. DEAR SIR: Your letter of January 23, with a copy of a proposed substitution for sections 517, 519, 650, 714, and 715 of the present tariff regulations was received.

I think your request to be presented to the Committee on Ways and Means for a modification of the existing sections is a reasonable one, and I hope you will include in your request to the Ways and Means Committee the request that the regulations under which paintings are imported for free exhibition by institutions founded for the advancement and encouragement of art may also be so modified as to make it possible for one public institution to transfer a painting to a sister institution of like character established for the advancement and encouragement of art and have the first institution's bond canceled and the second institution's bond accepted instead thereof.

The transfer of a painting which is brought to America for the legitimate purpose of exhibition to a sister institution for a like purpose should be freed from the troublesome and harassing labor connected with transferring the picture under the original institution’s bond. The whole purpose of bringing the picture to America is to afford our people education in the fine arts, and the way to do this should be made as easy as possible. If the second institution, or the one receiving the painting from the institution originally importing the work, is a responsible institution, there is no reason why it should not be accepted by the Government and the second institution given the privilege of exporting the picture at the conclusion of its exhibition. Very sincerely,

JOHN W. BEATTY, Director of Fine Arts.

BRIEF OF W. C. MARLEY, NEWARK, N. J., CONCERNING

PHOTOGRAPHS.

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY,

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington, D. C., January 29, 1913. The WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE,

House Office Building, Washington, D. C. GENTLEMEN: One of my constituents has requested me to urge the retention upon free list of such photographs as are not intended for sale, or the placing of them on the free list, and I inclose herewith a memorandum in regard to the matter received from him. Very truly, yours,

WALTER J. McCoy.

(Inclosure.) REQUEST FOR RETENTION ON OR ADDITION TO FREE LIST OF PHOTOGRAPHS, EITHER

MOUNTED OR UNMOUNTED, WHEN SAME ARE NOT INTENDED FOR SALE, Examples.-Photographs presented to museums, libraries, colleges, schools, societies, etc.; photographs sent to similar institutions for exchange; portfolios of photographs sent for circulation among members of photographic societies.

Reasons.--First, the public interest would be served by encouraging education and art and by eliminating annoying formalities; second, no American commercial photographer or manufacturer of photographic goods would be benefited were such à duty imposed, but rather the reverse; third, the amount of revenue derived from such duty would be very small; fourth, appraisal of values would be most difficult to make. Respectfully,

W. C. MARLEY.

PARAGRAPH 521.

Brass, old brass, clippings from brass or Dutch metal, all the foregoing,

fit only for remanufacture. PARAGRAPH 522.

Brazilian pebble, unwrought or unmanufactured. PARAGRAPH 523.

Bristles, crude, not sorted, bunched, or prepared.

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