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PARAGRAPH 643–COIR PARN.

Mr. CLEVELAND. The next topic which I wish to take up is section 713 of the free list of the tariff act of 1909, the second clause of which reads as follows:

Sticks of partridge, hair, wood, pimento, orange, myrtle, bamboo, rattan, reeds, unmanufactured, India malacca, joints, and other woods not specially provided for in this section in the rough, or not further advanced than cut into lengths suitable for sticks for umbrellas, parasols, sunshades, whips, fishing rods, or walking canes.

We respectfully request that this clause be amended by the omission of the words, "reeds unmanufactured.” Reeds are manufactured from rattan, and the present wording of the tariff makes a conflict between the free list and section 212 of Schedule D, under which reeds are subject to duty.

The CHAIRMAN. What has been the ruling of the courts as to that; which section did they make apply?

Mr. CLEVELAND. The customs authorities have construed that reeds of sizes suitable for the manufacture of whips one-quarter of an inch in diameter and larger should be allowed free entry under this clause in the free list. Such reeds can not be unmanufactured, as they are made only by the process of splitting rattan, and they ought not to come in free of duty, as should rattan itself. A tax now is proposed on reeds smaller than one-quarter of an inch.

The CHAIRMAN. Then, if we followed your suggestion we would throw some of these reeds that are now admitted free of duty into the tax list?

Mr. CLEVELAND. You would, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. Now give us the reason why you think that ought to be done.

Mr. CLEVELAND. The reason is this: These reeds are not unmanufactured; they are not a natural product; they are made only by the process of splitting rattan. Under the present administration of the tariff as it stands to-day a very large percentage of the reeds which are allowed free entry, one-quarter of an inch in diameter and larger, are not brought in for the manufacture of whips, but used for the manufacture of furniture and for other purposes.

The CHAIRMAN. What rate of duty is there under the present section; what percentage ?

Mr. CLEVELAND. They pay 10 per cent ad valorem, under section 212 of Schedule D.

Mr. HARRISON. And what amendment did you propose ?

Mr. CLEVELAND. We would strike out the words, " reeds unmanufactured."

Mr. HARRISON. How much of that class of goods is being made in this country to-day, reeds unmanufactured ?

Mr. CLEVELAND. I should say perhaps $750,000 worth.
Mr. HARRISON. How much is imported as free?
Mr. CLEVELAND. As free?

The CHAIRMAN. How much is being imported as free, which comes in free, the free portion of this?

Mr. CLEVELAND. I do not know that I can tell you that exactly. Mr. HARRISON. $913,000 worth.

The CHAIRMAN. Coming in free, and you can manufacture $750,000 worth?

Mr. CLEVELAND. About that; yes, sir.

PARAGRAPH 543-COIR YARN;

The CHAIRMAN. Why do you want that taxed ? Nine hundred dollars worth coming in that shape, and you are making $750,000 worth out of it. Why do you care whether it is protected or not?

Mr. CLEVELAND. For the reason that the prices at which those large-sized reeds are brought in and sold are so low that they keep our prices down to a level which is too low.

The CHAIRMAN. It is only $900 worth?
Mr. CLEVELAND. $900,000 worth.

The CHAIRMAN. Oh, I was mistaken about that; about $900,000 worth coming and about $750,000 worth manufactured ?

Mr. CLEVELAND. Approximately, I should say. Mr. Chairman, it seems that there was some misunderstanding in regard to the time that we were to be allotted, and I have here two briefs, one in regard to cocoa mats and mattings, and the other in regard to reeds and canes. If it is agreeable to the committee, I will not take any more time to read those, but I will file them.

The CHAIRMAN. You may file them and they will be printed in to-day's proceedings, and we will consider them. We will now hear some gentleman representing McCormick & Co., of Baltimore.

BRIEF OF Heywood Bros. & WAKEFIELD Co., JOSEPH WILD & Co., DARRAGA &

SMAIL.

The COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. We, the undersigned, manufacturers of cocoa mats and mattings, request that coir and coir yarn, or cocoa yarn or fiber, which are imported free of duty 'under section 543 of the free list, be left upon the free list in any revision of the tariff which may be suggested by your honorable committee.

Cocoa yarn and cocoa fiber are the materials used in the manufacture of cocoa mats and mattings. The entire supply is produced on the Malabar coast of India and on the island oi Ceylon, with probably more than 90 per cent of the production being on the Malabar coast. There is no cocoa fiber made in this country or its dependencies, and no cocoa yarn is spun in this country. Cocoa yarn and cocoa fiber are imported free of duty into Germany, Belgium, and Great Britain, where there is extensive manufacturing of cocoa mats and mattings. The prices paid in these countries for the labor in manufacturing mats and mattings are very much lower than the prices paid in the United States, and any duty placed upon the raw material of the American manufacturers will be a most serious handicap to them in competing against the steadily growing sale of mats and mattings imported into the United States irom these countries.

HEYWOOD Bros. & WAKEFIELD Co.,
By FRED M. CLEAVELAND.

JOSEPH Wild & Co.,
By HENRY ANDERSON.

DARRAGH & SMAIL.

New York, January 29, 1913. The Committee ON WAYS AND MEANS,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. GENTLEMEN: Referring to section 543 of free list, tariff of 1909, we beg to indorse the views expressed in brief presented by Messrs. Heywood Bros. & Wakefield Co., of Wakefield, Mass., and Joseph Wild & Co., of New York, as to the retention of coir yarn and fiber on the free list. We are, gentlemen, Your obedient servants,

DARRAGH & SMAIL.
A. T. McVICAR.

PARAGRAPH 544—COPPER,

PARAGRAPH 544.

Copper ore; regulus of, and black or coarse copper, and copper cement; old copper, fit only for remanufacture, clippings from new copper, and copper in plates, bars, ingots, or pigs, not manufactured or specially provided for in this section.

COPPER.

BRIEF OF ARTHUR SELIGMANN, NEW YORK, N. Y., ON COPPER.

New York, January 28, 1913. Hon. OSCAR W. UNDERWOOD, Chairman Ways and Means Committee,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR SIR: We respectfully wish to call your attention to an oversight in the last tariff law in so far as it was overlooked to state that copper in all forms is free. Such stipulation was in the previous tariff law and lately there have been difficulties to determine the correct classification under which certain forms of copper should come in. We particularly refer to copper ashes or residues which are sometimes also called copper scale and are a refuse material which is accumulated by the manufacturers using the pure copper. Naturally, as long as the refined and pure copper comes in free, the refuse material should also come in free of duty. Lately the appraisers have been undecided as to what to do with these importations, as they are not classified, and their opinions are divided as to whether such material as we mention above should not come in as waste material (not specially provided for) and pay 10 per cent ad valorem. Needless to say, the intention of the framers of the tariff law was not to levy a duty on ashes or residues of copper as long as they are allowing free import of the pure and refined metal. I might add that the above-mentioned article is only fit for remanufacture, and as it shows only about 80 per cent of copper, balance being mostly detrimental ingredients, the value is correspondingly lower than pure copper. We would thank you for looking into this matter and, if possible, add a stipulation in the proposed tariff law that copper ashes, residues, or scale are free of duty.” If this should not be feasible, we would suggest that the old wording that copper in all forms" is free, be again adopted, which could give the officers of the customhouse the necessary classification under which such refuse material as we mention above would be imported free.

I also wish to mention that if there is any duty levied it would be impossible to import these goods, as naturally it would be cheaper for the buyer to pay the price of pure copper than to buy the refuse with a duty added. Your kind attention will greatly oblige, yours, very truly,

ARTHUR SELIGMANN.

66

L. VOGELSTEIN & CO., NEW YORK, N. Y., WRITE ON COPPER

ASHES, ETC.

New YORK, January 13, 1913. Hon. Oscar W. UNDERWOOD,

Chairman Ways and Means Committee, Washington, D. C. DEAR SIR: In view of the motion on foot to place a duty on copper scale, we respectfully beg to submit the following:

Heretofore copper scale has been imported free of duty, being classified as black or coarse copper, which is on the free list under paragraph 544. Copper scale is a byproduct coming from copper rolling mills. It is the oxide or scale which forms on the surface of the copper when in the annealing furnace, and it is being gathered principally from the water tanks in which the copper is being cooled in order to give it the red color, but partly it is being swept up under the rolls.

The latter product has absolutely no value except for remelting or for dissolving in acid. The former product has some other usages. The production of clean copper scale in this country is insufficient to supply the demand, and we think that copper scale can properly be classified under paragraph 544, which includes also the clause that it is old and fit only for remanufacture," but, in view of the fact that the collector recently intended to classify copper scale under paragraph 479, we respectfully suggest that the article be specifically mentioned as being free under the new tariff. We feel sure that it is the intention of a paragraph like 544 to have such products come in

PARAGRAPH 549-KRYOLITH.

free, and it would only hamper American industries if a tariff was imposed on such material. Yours, very truly,

L. Vogelstein & Co.,

Agents for Aron Hirsh & Sohn. PARAGRAPH 545.

Composition metal of which copper is the component material of chief

value, not specially provided for in this section. PARAGRAPH 646.

Coral, marine, uncut, and unmanufactured. PARAGRAPH 547.

Cork wood, or cork bark, unmanufactured. PARAGRAPH 548.

Cotton, and cotton waste or flocks. PARAGRAPH 549.

Cryolite, or kryolith.

KRYOLITH.

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PENNSYLVANIA SALT MANUFACTURING Co.,
MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS AND IMPORTERS OF KRYOLITA,

115 CHESTNUT STREET,

Philadelphia, December 13, 1912. Hon. Oscar W. UNDERWOOD, Chairman Committee on Ways and Means,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR Sir: This article, which is a mineral mined in Greenland and shipped into this country, has been on the free list over 40 years and properly so. In order, however, that the item should not be subject to misconception, we respectfully recommend the addition of the word “crude,” this making the article on the free list read “ Kryolith, crude.” We suggest this in the knowledge that a synthetic article, distinctively a chemical compound, has been passed free by the customs authorities, though maní. festly subject to a duty: Crude kryolith, in order to be made marketable, must be subjected to an expensive treatment for separating from impurities, as the original article contains many other minerals besides kryolith itself, and the selling of a manufactured imitation under the pretense that it is the real article is made possible by its free admission, all of which would be corrected by the introduction of the word “crude" as above stated. Respectfully submitting above, we are, Yours, truly,

PENNSYLVANIA Salt MANUFACTURING CO.,
THEO. ARMSTRONG,

President.
PARAGRAPH 550.

Cudbear. PARAGRAPH 551.

Curling stones, or quoits, and curling-stone handles. PARAGRAPH 552.

Curry, and curry powder. PARAGRAPH 553.

Cuttlefish bone. PARAGRAPH 654.

Dandelion roots, raw, dried, or undried, but unground. PARAGRAPH 555.

Diamonds and other precious stones, rough, or uncut, and not advanced in condition or value from their natural state by cleaving, splitting, cutting, or other process, including glaziers' and engravers' diamonds not set.

PARAGRAPH 566—MINERS' DIAMONDS. PARAGRAPH 556.

Miners' diamonds, whether in their natural form or broken, and bort; any of the foregoing not set, and diamond dust.

MINERS' DIAMONDS.

BRIEF OF A. L. A. HIMMELWIGHT, NEW YORK, N. Y.

THE STEEL SET DIAMOND Co.,
Room 910, No. 46 WEST TWENTY-FOURTH STREET,

New York, N. Y., December 14, 1912. UNITED STATES CUSTOMS DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C. Dear Sirs: In behalf of the Steel Set Diamond Co., which concern was obliged to discontinue business a year ago, the writer wishes to call your attention to what in his opinion is an injustice and which caused the discontinuation of the Steel Set Diamond Co.'s business. I refer to the present conditions in regard to the importation of drilled diamonds.

About 10 years ago the Steel Set Diamond Co. imported a large number of drilling and polishing machines at considerable expense and engaged in manufacturing diamond wire dies on a large scale. A large number of stones were drilled and polished from which dies were made. Later it was discovered that competitors of the company were importing the stones already drilled and could sell dies made by them at a fair profit and at a price that represented less than the actual cost of manufacturing to the Steel Set Diamond Co.Owing to the superiority of the dies manufactured by the Steel Set Diamond Co., which fact it was possible to establish after a few years, the company was able to sell a number of dies at higher prices, but it was impossible to build up a sufficiently extensive business under those conditions to make it profitable, so that last year the company was obliged to suspend business and discontinue.

Your attention is called to the duty on imported drilled stones, which is so low at the present time as to prevent American workmen from competing in producing these dies. The duty on imported drilled diamonds of this character should be increased at least $2 or $3 per drilled stone in order to enable American workmen to compete.

It is understood that imported drilled stones coming from European countries, where exceedingly low wages are paid the workmen, permit the manufacture of dies in this country at prices that American manufacturers can not compete with. If diamonds were produced in this country, the situation would be entirely different, but as the stones must be imported there is no other possible means of protecting American workmen and concerns in this line.

It is hoped that the new administration in taking up the tariff revision will give this specific matter some attention and adjust the duties so that American workmen can compete in drilling the stones used in the manufacture of wire dies. Yours, very truly,

A. L. A. HIMMELWIGHT.

PARAGRAPH 557.

Divi-divi. PARAGRAPH 568.

Dragon's blood.

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