The Pomological Manual: Or, a Treatise on Fruits ; Containing Descriptions of a Great Number of the Most Valuable Varieties for the Orchard and Garden

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T. & J. Swords, 1831 - 416 páginas
 

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Página i - Th' inspiring breeze: and meditate the book Of Nature ever open ; aiming thence, Warm from the heart, to learn the moral song. Here, as I steal along the sunny wall, Where Autumn basks, with fruit empurpled deep, My pleasing theme continual prompts my thought: Presents the downy peach ; the shining plum; The ruddy fragrant nectarine; and dark, Beneath his ample leaf, the luscious fig.
Página ix - Cross fertilisation is effected, as every one knows, by the action of the pollen of one plant upon the stigma of another. The nature of this action is highly curious. Pollen consists of extremely minute hollow balls or bodies ; their cavity is filled with fluid, in which swim particles of a figure varying from spherical to oblong, and having an apparently spontaneous motion. The stigma is composed of very lax tissue, the intercellular passages of which have a greater diameter than the moving particles...
Página viii - It is probable that it was originally due to accident, and also that it was still mere chance which continued to operate down to very modern times. Philosophers are unacquainted with the reason why there should be any tendency to variation from the characters first stamped on any species by Nature ; but all know that this tendency does exist, and in a most remarkable degree in many species. There is in all beings a disposition to deviate from their original nature when cultivated, or even in a wild...
Página ix - The power of procuring intermediate varieties by the intermixture of the pollen and stigma of two different parents is, however, that which most deserves consideration. We all know that hybrid plants are constantly produced in every garden, and that improvements of the most remarkable kind are yearly occurring in consequence.
Página x - Quince and the latter, or the Plum and Cherry, or the Gooseberry and the Currant. On the other hand, new varieties obtained by the intermixture of two pre-existing varieties are not less prolific, but, on the contrary, often more so than either of their parents ; witness the numerous sorts of Flemish Pears which have been raised by...
Página ix - ... discharges its contents among the lax tissue upon which it has fallen. The moving particles descend through the tissue of the style, until one, or sometimes more of them, finds its way, by routes specially destined by Nature for this service, into a little opening in the integuments of the ovulum, or young seed. Once deposited there, the particle swells, increases gradually in size, separates into radicle and cotyledons, and finally becomes the embryo — that part which is to give birth, when...
Página xii - It is upon the existence of such a remarkable physiological peculiarity in plants, that propagation entirely depends ; an evident proof of which may be seen in this circumstance. Take a cutting of a vine consisting only of the space which lies between two buds, or an internodium, as botanists would call such a piece, and no art will succeed in ever making it become a new plant, no matter how considerable the size of the internodium may be.* But, on the other hand, take the bud of a vine without any...
Página xi - Plums upon Plums, and Peaches upon Peaches or Almonds, the scion is, in regard to fertility, exactly in the same state as if it had not been grafted at all. While, on the other hand, a great increase of fertility is the result of grafting Pears upon Quinces, Peaches upon Plums, Apples upon Whitethorn, and the like. In these latter cases, the food absorbed from the earth by the root of the stock is communicated slowly...
Página 203 - Fruit pyramidally ovate, very even in form, but compressed towards the stalk ; about three inches and a half long, and two inches and three quarters in diameter.
Página ix - In sowing seeds for the purpose of procuring improved varieties, care should be had, not only that the seeds be taken from the finest existing kinds; but also that the most handsome, the largest and the most perfectly ripened specimens should be those that supply the seed. A seedling plant will always partake more or less of the character of its parent, the qualities of which are concentrated in the embryo when it has arrived at full maturity. How this concentration takes place, we are as ignorant...

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