Poetic Meter and Poetic Form

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"This book might be required reading for all students of poetry because it makes wonderfully clear the relationship of metrics to the formal achievement of meaning ... Fussell's command of his subject and his never-failing common sense will guarantee ... enrichment for anyone who takes the time to read this book."--Frank Lentricchia, Jr., PoetryDonated by Prabu Vasan.

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - rooze - LibraryThing

This is, indeed, an authoritative guide to meter and form. However, Fussell's arrogance had me running to other equally authoritative yet substantially less elitist sources. Try Mary Oliver's Rules of the Dance or Stephen Fry's The Ode Less Travelled instead. Leer comentario completo

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - michaelm42071 - LibraryThing

This is not the first book to read on the subject of how form assists meaning in poetry; for that I would go back to John Ciardi’s How Does a Poem Mean? But Fussell’s book is a good, succinct one for ... Leer comentario completo

Contenido

The Nature of Meter
3
The Technique of Scansion
17
Metrical Variations
30
Derechos de autor

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Acerca del autor (1979)

Paul Fussell Jr. was born in Pasadena, California on March 22, 1924. He was drafted into the Army in 1943 while attending Pomona College. During his tour of duty, he won the Bronze Star and two Purple Hearts. He returned to college in 1945. He received a bachelor of arts degree from Pomona College in 1947 and a master's degree and a doctorate in English from Harvard University. He taught English at Connecticut College for Women, Rutgers University, and the University of Pennsylvania. During this time he wrote several books on literary topics including The Rhetorical World of Augustan Humanism: Ethics and Imagery from Swift to Burke, Poetic Meter and Poetic Form, and Samuel Johnson and the Life of Writing. In 1975, he published The Great War and Modern Memory, which was a study of World War I and how its horrors fostered a disillusioned modernist sensibility. This book won both the National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism and the National Book Award for Arts and Letters. His other works include Abroad: British Literary Traveling Between the Wars, Class: A Guide Through the American Status System, Wartime: Understanding and Behavior in the Second World War, BAD: Or, the Dumbing of America, and Doing Battle: The Making of a Skeptic. He died of natural causes on May 23, 2012 at the age of 88.

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