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THE

ATHENEUM ;

OR

SPIRIT OF THE

ENGLISH MAGAZINES.

THIRD SERIES.

VOLUME II.

Suser inte
APRIL TO OCTOBER, 1829.

PERIODICAL LITERATURE on the one hand affords employment to the public mind, and favors its tendencies to the pursuit of science and intellectual improvement ; and, on the other, it gives a more general and freer spirit to literature itself than it would otherwise have, by bringing together the productions of every class of mind, displaying the main points of consideration in almost every question that can be started, opening the door to every inquirer whose talents entitle him to respect, and, in addition to this, offering something, which even in its lightness is elegant, for those who, were it not for the resources it affords, would live in a state of perfect intellectual sloth.-Rev. Henry Stebbing.

BOSTON:

PUBLISHED BY JOHN COTTON,

(Corner of Washington Street and Franklin Street.)

SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE RECEIVED ALSO BY THE FOLLOWING AGENTS :CHARLES S. FRANCIS,
NEW-YORK; WHIPPLE & LAWRENCE, SALEM; WILLIAM HILLIARD, CAMBRIDGE ; JOHN
W. FOSTER, PORTSMOUTH : SAMUEL COLMAN, PORTLAND; CLARENDON HARRIS, WORCES-
TER ; GEORGE DANA, PROVIDENCE ; HEZEKIAH HOWE, NEW-HAVEN; WEARE C. LITTLE,
ALBANY ; E. LITTELL & BROTHER, PHILADELPHIA ; EDW. J. COALE, BALTIMORE ; J.
THOMAS, GEORGETOWN; JOSEPH TARDIF, QUEBEC ; H. S. HULL, BENNINGTON, Vt. ; W. T.
WILLIAMS, SAVANNAH; WILLIAM H. COFFIN, HUDSON, N. Y.; WILLIAM HOWE, NEW-
BEDFORD ; COLLIER & BARTLETT, PLYMOUTH; FARMER & BROWN, HINGHAM; GEORGE
W. ELA, DOVER, N. H.; DENNIS CLAUDE, JR., ANNAPOLIS, MD.; E. S. DURYEA, CHARLES-
TON, s. c.; HENRY ROGERS, P. M., SPARTA, GA.; JAMES M. HARALSON, JACKSON, TENNES-
SEE ; AND J. A. HOISINGTON & co., MONTREAL.
Price $3 stitched, or $ 3,50 bound, including six colored Plates of Female Fashions ;

without them, $ 2,50 and $3.

PREFACE.

Ar the conclusion of another volume of the Atheneum we are again called upon, by inclination as well as custom, to acknowledge the patronage with which we have been favored, and to express our thanks to those from whom it has been received. Our exertions to maintain in this volume the character wbich the work has long enjoyed, and to render it worthy the support of its patrons, have been strenuous, and, we trust, successful. While no pains have been spared with regard to the accuracy and neatness of its mechanical execution, we have endeavored that its miscellaneous contents should form a treasury to which readers of all tastes pay resort with pleasure and advantage ; -so to intermix the solid and light—the erudite and plain—the pungent and mild-that they should constitute a sufficiently diversified repast for the various intellectual appetites for which we have undertaken to cater.

We consider ourselves bappy in having been enabled to appropriate not a few of the sweetest and most recent poetical compositions from the pens of celebrated poets. Some of the choicest of these will be found the productions of female genius ; and while the effusions of such writers as Mrs. Hemans, Miss Bowles, L. E. L. and Miss Browne enrich our pages, we cannot doubt that they will possess strong attractions for the fairer portion of our readers.

Devoted, as the Atheneum is, to no party either in Politics or Religion,advocating neither the popular cause of Total Abstinence or Anti-masonry,given in fact neither to the support or opposition of any new doctrine or fashionable folly, we are deprived of one powerful hold on the public mind; but still our Journal may be read with pleasure and satisfaction by those interested and engaged in every good cause. In perusing its pages, the successful politician may forget the many perplexities of a new office, judiciously conferred by a wise administration, and the unsuccessful one the bitter disappointment of being denied, by an ungrateful government, a share of these perplexities ;-the religious disputant, if he will lay aside his angry and contentious feelings, may find something which will harmonise with his pious and devout sentiments—which will teach him that it is not religion, but theology, which has excited the unchristian emotions he has endeavored to suppress ;-the advocate of the cold water system may indulge in a stimulus unattended with the hazard of the one he has forbidden hiinself; and the enemy to masonry, suffering his fearful apprehensions and the shade of Morgan to repose for awhile, may forget that Masonry and Murder, Secresy and Sedition-more intimately connected, he imagines, than the brothers of Siam--are even existing in the land of his affection.

As the materials of our work are mostly the productions of other minds and

PREFACE.

At the conclusion of another volume of the ATHENEUM we are again called upon, by inclination as well as custom, to acknowledge the patronage with which we have been favored, and to express our thanks to those from whom it has been received. Our exertions to maintain in this volume the character which the work has long enjoyed, and to render it worthy the support of its patrons, have been strenuous, and, we trust, successful. While no pains have been spared with regard to the accuracy and neatness of its mechanical execution, we have endeavored that its miscellaneous contents should form a treasury to which readers of all tastes may resort with pleasure and advantage; -so to intermix the solid and light—the erudite and plain—the pungent and mild—that they should constitute a sufficiently diversified repast for the various intellectual appetites for which we have undertaken to cater.

We consider ourselves happy in having been enabled to appropriate not a few of the sweetest and most recent poetical compositions from the pens of celebrated poets. Some of the choicest of these will be found the productions of female genius ; and while the effusions of such writers as Mrs. Hemans, Miss Bowles, L. E. L. and Miss Browne enrich our pages, we cannot doubt that they will possess strong attractions for the fairer portion of our readers.

Devoted, as the Atheneum is, to no party either in Politics or Religion advocating neither the popular cause of Total Abstinence or Anti-masonry,given in fact neither to the support or opposition of any new doctrine or fashionable folly, we are deprived of one powerful hold on the public mind; but still our Journal may be read with pleasure and satisfaction by those interested and engaged in every good cause. In perusing its pages, the successful politician may forget the many perplexities of a new office, judiciously conferred by a wise administration, and the unsuccessful one the bitter disappointment of being denied, by an ungrateful government, a share of these perplexities ;—the religious disputant, if he will lay aside his angry and contentious feelings, may find something which will harmonise with his pious and devout sentiments—which will teach him that it is not religion, but theology, which bas excited the unchristian emotions he has endeavored to suppress ;-the advocate of the cold water system may indulge in a stimulus unattended with the bazard of the one he has forbidden hiinself; and the enemy to masonry, suffering his fearful apprehensions and the shade of Morgan to repose for awhile, may forget that Masonry and Murder, Secresy and Sedition—more intimately connected, he imagines, than the brothers of Siam--are even existing in the land of his affection.

As the materials of our work are mostly the productions of other minds and

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