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THE

GLASSE OF TIME,

IN THE FIRST AGE.

DIVINELY HANDLED

BY THOMAS PEYTON, OF LINCOLNES INNE, GENT.

Seene and Allowed.

LONDON: Printed by BERNARD ALSOP, for LAWRENCE
CHAPMAN, and are to be sold at his Shop
over against Staple Inne.

1620.

NEW YORK:
JOHN B. ALDEN, PUBLISHER.

Copyright, 1885.

BY

JOHN B. ALDEN.

TROW'S
PRINTING AND BOOKBINDING COMPANY,

NEW YORK

In the extracts from The Glasse of Time contained in the Introduction, the orthography has been corrected so as to conform to present usage. In the Poem itself, as here reprinted, the spelling, punctuation, italicization, and capitalization of the original edition have been strictly adhered to. This reprint is therefore an accurate transcript of the book as put forth by Lawrence Chapman in 1620, 1623.

INTRODUCTION. Thomas Peyton, the author of the following poem, was born at Royston, in the County of Cambridge, England, in 1595. He was the son and heir of Thomas Peyton, Esq., described in the records of Lincoln's Inn, London, as “late of Royston in the Co. of Cambridge, gentleman.”

The Peyton family had been connected with Cambridgeshire, Suffolk, Norfolk, and Huntingdon, or the Eastern Counties, from the Conquest. The founder was William de Malet, a Norman Baron, who accompanied the Conqueror to England and was sheriff of Yorkshire in the 3d year of William I., and obtained from the Crown as a recompense for his military services, grants of sundry lordships and manors, amongst which were Sibton and Peyton Hall. “The knightly family of Peyton flowed out of the same male stock," says Camden, “ whence the Uffords, Earls of Suffolk, descended; albeit they assumed the surname of Peyton, according to the usage of that age, from their Manor of Peyton Hall, in Boxford, in the County of Suffolk."

The first of the family, by the name of Peyton, upon record was, Reginald de Peyton, second son of Walter, Lord of Sibton, younger brother of William de Malet, sheriff of Yorkshire. This Reginald de Peyton, was lord of Peyton Hall, and was an officer in the household of the Earl of Norfolk: ancestor of that earl who refused aid to Henry III. during the Barons' war, 12581265, and when the King said “I will send reapers, and reap your fields for you,” answered defiantly to him; “and I will send you back the heads of your reapers.”

From this ancient stock, there is no room to doubt our poet's descent. His father was, as well as we can now make out from the family records, the son of Sir Thomas Peyton, M.P. for

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