The kaleidoscope of anecdotes and aphorisms, collected by C. Sinclair

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Catherine Sinclair
1851

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Página 203 - Caesar had his Brutus — Charles the First, his Cromwell — and George the Third'* — (' Treason,' cried the speaker — ' Treason, treason !' echoed from every part of the house.
Página 393 - Jesus saith unto him, If I will that he tarry till I come, what is that to thee ? follow thou me.
Página 108 - I have some favourite flowers in spring, among which are the mountain-daisy, the hare-bell, the fox-glove, the wild-brier rose, the budding birch, and the hoary hawthorn, that I view and hang over with particular delight.
Página 249 - The poorest man may in his cottage bid defiance to all the forces of the Crown. It may be frail; its roof may shake : the wind may blow through it; the storms may enter, the rain may enter - but the King of England cannot enter ! All his forces dare not cross the threshold of the ruined tenement.
Página 172 - Who is it that causes to blow the loud winds of winter, and that calms them again in the summer? Who is it that rears up the shade of these lofty forests and blasts them with the quick lightning at his pleasure? The same Being who gave to you a country on the other side of the waters, and gave ours to us; and by this title we will defend it...
Página 161 - Ariosto tells a pretty story of a fairy, who, by some mysterious law of her nature, was condemned to appear at certain seasons in the form of a foul and poisonous snake.
Página 118 - A sense of duty pursues us ever. It is omnipresent, like the Deity. If we take to ourselves the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, duty performed, or duty violated, is still with us, for our happiness or our misery.
Página 4 - Wise men have said are wearisome; who reads Incessantly, and to his reading brings not A spirit and judgment equal or superior (And what he brings, what needs he elsewhere seek) Uncertain and unsettled still remains, Deep versed in books and shallow in himself, Crude or intoxicate, collecting toys, And trifles for choice matters, worth a sponge; As children gathering pebbles on the shore.
Página 105 - God loves from whole to parts: but human soul Must rise from individual to the whole. Self-love but serves the virtuous mind to wake, As the small pebble stirs the peaceful lake; The centre moved, a circle straight succeeds, Another still, and still another spreads; Friend, parent, neighbour, first it will embrace; His country next; and next all human race...
Página 25 - Ye have heard that it hath been said, An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth: but I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on the right cheek, turn to him the other also.

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